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Old 08-19-2007, 07:12 PM
 
Location: IN
22,273 posts, read 38,891,315 times
Reputation: 14856
What all of the white shaded counties have in common:
Harsh climates; ( Deserts, very high elevation areas, and high plains areas).
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Old 08-19-2007, 07:13 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,997,653 times
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Who would make a map that puts densities of 250-63000 under one color? This is useless.
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Old 08-20-2007, 12:09 AM
 
60 posts, read 241,872 times
Reputation: 42
http://www.census.gov/population/cen...ensr01-103.pdf

Last edited by TerryTurtle27; 08-20-2007 at 12:20 AM..
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Old 08-20-2007, 09:49 AM
 
Location: 32°19'03.7"N 106°43'55.9"W
8,295 posts, read 18,246,103 times
Reputation: 7781
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleMissSunshine View Post
It looks like NJ is the ONLY state where the entire thing is dark blue. I can't believe it can be dark blue in Cumberland County or Sussex County. When I am there I feel like I am in the middle of the wilderness. I guess if I really went to the wilderness I'd be in for a big suprise lol.

As an ex resident of the Garden State, and a current resident of the Land Of Enchantment, you have no idea, Little Miss Sunshine. Saturday night, I drove back home from Bisbee Arizona. 250 miles. The first part of the trip was driving up Rt 80 (not Rt 80 in NJ) from Douglas Arizona (border town) to Lordsburg NM. It was about 100 miles, on a one lane road. In the time I drove it, I saw a total of 4 cars, and 3 snakes.

The sense of scale here is nothing a New Jerseyan can relate to, unless they actually bore witness to it. I used to drive to work from Las Cruces NM to Holloman AFB, about 60 miles away. During the course of that drive, the sightlines between mountain ranges (Organs to the Sacramentos) are about 70 miles. When you are in the middle of the Tularosa Basin, you feel like you can just reach out and grab both mountain ranges at the same time. The comparison in distance between these two mountain ranges would be the equivalent of driving in Dover NJ and being able to see the Delaware River and the George Washington Bridge at the same time, and seem them both clearly. Translated: there are no trees, and no people. Just vast nothingness.
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Old 08-20-2007, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Nashville
81 posts, read 310,251 times
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You can really discern where the transition from east to west begins once the population densities fall off and the counties become larger.

You can also easily tell where the prominent cities are based judging by the dark blue streaks.
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Old 08-20-2007, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Home is where we park it.
3,099 posts, read 8,579,417 times
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Having driven thru the *three states of Texas*, I can tell you there are times when there is NOTHING out there. For HOURS!!!!!

My husband and I came up with that nickname when we spent three days driving across Texas with three cats one time. It felt like three states. Liz
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Old 08-20-2007, 12:06 PM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 13,249,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnehahapolitan View Post
Who would make a map that puts densities of 250-63000 under one color? This is useless.
I agree, it really doesn't give one a feel for population density. There is a pretty big difference between a county that averages 250 per square mile and my county, that averages 5,686 people per square mile (12.5k per mile in the city proper).

I agree with the previous poster though about the scale of those western counties being unimaginable to those who grew up in densely populated regions as I have. I'll never forget the vast expanses of the plains and southwest when I took a trip at age 16 (it was my first time out west), it blew my mind. I've not been back since, but I've never forgotten that landscape.
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Old 08-20-2007, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Live in VA, Work in MD, Play in DC
699 posts, read 2,091,879 times
Reputation: 274
Many immigrants from non-European countries always tell me that they are usually surprised that there is so much open spaces in the U.S. They said that they always figured it was one massive populated country with massive development from coast to coast. Probably because most of the media they get are in cities.
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Old 08-20-2007, 12:29 PM
 
6,164 posts, read 14,822,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CTownNative View Post
Yeah most of the big cities in the west have the dark blue for thier counties,than you leave that county and your in a sparsly populated place.The only state that has many dense counties in the west is California.
You don't even have to leave the county. For example, driving east out of San Diego on I-8, you are quickly in sparsely-populated mountains, then the desert, before you reach the county line.
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Old 08-20-2007, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs,CO
2,368 posts, read 7,092,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Around View Post
You don't even have to leave the county. For example, driving east out of San Diego on I-8, you are quickly in sparsely-populated mountains, then the desert, before you reach the county line.
They should even make the maps so you can tell where its dense,and non-dense in the counties,or have they already done that?
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