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Old 08-18-2007, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 16,507,432 times
Reputation: 4650

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I currently am living in rural Arkansas near Fort Smith attending college, but I will be graduating this fall with a bachelors in IT and I want to relocate. I am totally unhappy in rural Arkansas, this area is not a good fit for me, my interests, or my lifestyle.

The Dallas/Fort Worth area is at the top of my list for cities of relocation, although I am considering other metros. I just don't want to stay here!

What would be the best way to go about finding a job in a new city? How can I overcome the problem of employers overlooking resumes with non-local addresses (without lying on my resume!)? Is my situation common or do most people stay in the area in which they graduate college?

I also have the problem of having attended college in a rural area where internships (IT) were not plentiful, giving me less experience than I would like at this stage in my career. Somebody please give me advice. Thanks for any replies!
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Old 08-18-2007, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Midwest
799 posts, read 2,086,150 times
Reputation: 216
Ultimately, it comes down to where jobs in your field are located...most employers will fly you out, and put you up in a hotel, for an interview. While you are there, spend time checking the place out, and check out competitors to your interviewer, in case you take the job and wind up wanting out in 3 months. If there are no other prospective employers, you would have to move again, so have a Plan B, if you can.
As far as an intership goes, you need a job which will pay, so you can live, now that you are graduated.
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Old 08-20-2007, 01:40 PM
 
2,776 posts, read 3,630,651 times
Reputation: 3043
Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
I currently am living in rural Arkansas near Fort Smith attending college, but I will be graduating this fall with a bachelors in IT and I want to relocate. I am totally unhappy in rural Arkansas, this area is not a good fit for me, my interests, or my lifestyle.

What would be the best way to go about finding a job in a new city? How can I overcome the problem of employers overlooking resumes with non-local addresses (without lying on my resume!)? Is my situation common or do most people stay in the area in which they graduate college?

I also have the problem of having attended college in a rural area where internships (IT) were not plentiful, giving me less experience than I would like at this stage in my career.
#1 - Seek out jobs which in their description state they will provide relocation benefits (aka pay for your relocation). Hiring managers & recruiters for such positions will not toss your resume away because of where you live right now. Also seek out positions which do not require multiple years of experience (don't even waste your time applying to these unless you have a demonstrable skill - this seems obvious, but worth mentioning because of what I've seen). The typical online job sites are a good bet, as is utilizing your college's career center, as is identifying/creating a list of top companies you would like to work for and then visiting their websites to see what jobs they are advertising.

#2 - Not having an internship isn't the end of the world, but as you surmized it does weaken your resume. Engage a career center at yours or other colleges nearby, utilize any professor connections you may be able to leverage, custom tailor your resume for each job you apply to, and apply to many. Also be ready for interviews - take a course on interviewing if you can and practice. Ideally you want to line up a position before you graduate.

#3 - Since I am in the Tech industry it's hard for me to not state the following. I really want to be "positive" for you, but I think you and others like you deserve to hear the truth. The IT industry in the US is disintegrating - being replaced by low-cost offshore resources wherever possible by every company. You may be in for a major challenge in finding long term career stability and satisfaction as such. I could go into extreme detail but seriously just take a quick look at some of my previous posts and the threads about Outsourcing. The IT Industry is in trouble. It's what you got your degree in, all I can say to you is "good luck" if you want a long term future in this industry. To survive you will need to quickly move into management ranks, demonstrate a skill hardly anyone has which someone needs very badly, accept a lower salary, or do something which requires "customer facing" activity that an offshore or h1 visa employee couldn't do themselves.

Good luck with everything - your situation is very common. Expanding your job search beyond your geography is really very smart and increases the odds of your employment significantly. Many large companies (most in fact) will hire from out of state, and some will pay relocation benefits.
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Old 08-20-2007, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC (in my mind)
7,946 posts, read 16,507,432 times
Reputation: 4650
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbuszu View Post
#1 - Seek out jobs which in their description state they will provide relocation benefits (aka pay for your relocation). Hiring managers & recruiters for such positions will not toss your resume away because of where you live right now. Also seek out positions which do not require multiple years of experience (don't even waste your time applying to these unless you have a demonstrable skill - this seems obvious, but worth mentioning because of what I've seen). The typical online job sites are a good bet, as is utilizing your college's career center, as is identifying/creating a list of top companies you would like to work for and then visiting their websites to see what jobs they are advertising.

#2 - Not having an internship isn't the end of the world, but as you surmized it does weaken your resume. Engage a career center at yours or other colleges nearby, utilize any professor connections you may be able to leverage, custom tailor your resume for each job you apply to, and apply to many. Also be ready for interviews - take a course on interviewing if you can and practice. Ideally you want to line up a position before you graduate.

#3 - Since I am in the Tech industry it's hard for me to not state the following. I really want to be "positive" for you, but I think you and others like you deserve to hear the truth. The IT industry in the US is disintegrating - being replaced by low-cost offshore resources wherever possible by every company. You may be in for a major challenge in finding long term career stability and satisfaction as such. I could go into extreme detail but seriously just take a quick look at some of my previous posts and the threads about Outsourcing. The IT Industry is in trouble. It's what you got your degree in, all I can say to you is "good luck" if you want a long term future in this industry. To survive you will need to quickly move into management ranks, demonstrate a skill hardly anyone has which someone needs very badly, accept a lower salary, or do something which requires "customer facing" activity that an offshore or h1 visa employee couldn't do themselves.

Good luck with everything - your situation is very common. Expanding your job search beyond your geography is really very smart and increases the odds of your employment significantly. Many large companies (most in fact) will hire from out of state, and some will pay relocation benefits.
Thanks for replying. Its sad that the IT industry is in such sad shape especially since when I graduated, counselors were stressing how it was the future and was the industry to go into. There are still a few optimistic reports about IT, but most forums are filled with nothing but pessimism about the field. Due to your response, I have a few more questions.

The town I live in is a very isolationist type place. People don't move here from other places, and people don't usually leave either. This is the kind of place where everybody is born here, grows up here, works here, and dies here. I know many people who are over 50 and have never been more than 20 miles away from Ft. Smith. This area is in sense a society all its own and I have little connection to the outside world aside from online friends (college students) who can't help me much at this stage anyways. My college career center only services this local area. How can I overcome this and get some networking going in other cities (Dallas/Ft. Worth for example)?

If I am unable to find employment in IT immediately, is there any other fields I would qualify for with my degree besides teen jobs (retail/food service) or blue-collar factory work?

My advisor told me if I dont yet have a job lined up by the time I graduate, I should just move to a location I want to be in and then apply for jobs, because it would open up possibilities with the smaller local companies who wont hire me at the moment because of where I currently live. This seems extremely risky though and is a situation I want to avoid if at all possible.
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Old 08-21-2007, 05:00 AM
 
2,776 posts, read 3,630,651 times
Reputation: 3043
Default going to graduate - need to find a job

Quote:
Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
The town I live in is a very isolationist type place. People don't move here from other places, and people don't usually leave either. This is the kind of place where everybody is born here, grows up here, works here, and dies here. My college career center only services this local area. How can I overcome this and get some networking going in other cities (Dallas/Ft. Worth for example)?

If I am unable to find employment in IT immediately, is there any other fields I would qualify for with my degree besides teen jobs (retail/food service) or blue-collar factory work?

My advisor told me if I dont yet have a job lined up by the time I graduate, I should just move to a location I want to be in and then apply for jobs,
#1 - The professors at your college inside and outside your program should have connections residing in other areas. You need to investigate this. You also should try to develop relationships with professors and any career centers of nearby colleges. Seriously, this may be tough for you, but I would approach professors you don't know of similar programs and just start talking with them - ask them questions like you have here on this board. Tell them you need advice and help the same way and I bet you'll be surprised what you learn (and how many professors especially in an area like yours love to help).

#2 - I believe your undergraduate degree in IT "qualifies" you for anything which a normal undergraduate Business degree would (if you've taken basic management coursework while pursuing it). My advice is to start seeking out other career paths that look interesting to you. I cannot pick something out for you but will tell you that most undergraduate degrees are like yours and don't lead down a particular professional path anyway. There are thus many entry level jobs across the US which require an applicant to just have "any undergraduate" degree. That said, perhaps something like selling IT or selling Technology or selling Software would be a decent fit for you. "Selling" is client-facing... it is not going to be outsourced.

#3 - Unless I had friends or family to live with and to move in with for free in a desirable location, I would not move just hoping to land a job in the future in that new location. Your thoughts regarding being hired but concerned about your home address isn't completely unfounded... BUT, you need to be careful with this idea you were given.

I would verify and then re-verify that wherever you go the job market is good for the type of work you want to do. Also, beyond job market, ensure you would like to live in a particular area mid to long term. I'm very tempted for you to instead of moving to just be clear in your resume or resume cover letter that you are willing to relocate, perhaps have investigated the job's vicinity already and like what you've seen, OR lastly that --> you will be relocating there very shortly for personal reasons which in combination with your perceived perfect fit skill set has provided further impetus for applying for this position (yes, you're not telling the truth for this last reason given, but if you get a job offer, you already told me you would be willing to move any pay for it yourself anyway - so how can this hurt you or the prospective employer?)

I hope this advice helps you out.
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Old 08-21-2007, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Missouri
6,044 posts, read 23,242,599 times
Reputation: 5171
Atlanta might be another option; I have a friend in IT who relocated there several years ago and is doing quite well. The cost of living is reasonable.
I think the suggestion of looking for a company w/ a relocation package is good, but I wouldn't plan on making a big move without some cash set aside, at least a few months' living expenses to dip into in case things are rough at first.
Try this website to see where job opportunities in your field are expected to increase:
Occupational Projections Page (broken link)
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Old 08-21-2007, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
7,731 posts, read 12,993,518 times
Reputation: 5979
New York City.
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