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Old 12-01-2011, 11:30 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
2,311 posts, read 4,632,173 times
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Growing up, I was under the impression that any mountains in the West (i.e. Sierra Nevada, Sangre de Cristo, Cascades) were part of the Rockies and that any in the east (i.e. Poconos, Ozarks, Allegehnies) were part of the Appalachians. Am I way off, or is this accurate?

Thanks.
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Old 12-01-2011, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Huntington Beach, CA
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The are a part of the Coastal Range. Quite different from the Rockies
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Old 12-01-2011, 12:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neworleansisprettygood View Post
Growing up, I was under the impression that any mountains in the West (i.e. Sierra Nevada, Sangre de Cristo, Cascades) were part of the Rockies and that any in the east (i.e. Poconos, Ozarks, Allegehnies) were part of the Appalachians. Am I way off, or is this accurate?

Thanks.

Techinally all the western ranges from the Coastal ranges, Brooks Range, St. Elias, Cascades, Rockies, and Sierra Nevada are part of the North American Cordillera. The rockies are only a subset of the Cordillera.

The North American Cordillera is made up of many subranges which includes the rockies and the Cascades. Essentially it is a vast combination of ranges that stretch up into Alaska along the western half of the North American Continent.
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Old 12-01-2011, 12:56 PM
 
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The Rockies are separated from the Sierra Nevada and Cascades by the Great Basin and Snake River and Columbia River Plateaus. In the area stretching from Northern New Mexico to British Columbia/Alberta there's a lot of different mountain ranges included as part of the Rockies chain, including the Sangre De Cristos, San Juan Mountains, Front Range, Grand Tetons, Wasatch, Bitteroots, Wind River Range, and so on.

The Sierra Nevada and Cascades are seperate from each other geologically, although they run into each other in Northern California and are sometimes considered part of the greater Pacific Mountain System along with the coastal mountain ranges.

I the Poconos and Alleghenies ranges are considered part of the great Applachian Mountain system along with the Blue Ridge, White Mountains, etc... I believe the Ozarks are isolated and geographically and geologically distinct from any other mountain range. The Adirondacks is also distinct from the Applachians and more related to the Canadian Shield area.
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Old 12-02-2011, 03:03 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,706 posts, read 20,416,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
The Rockies are separated from the Sierra Nevada and Cascades by the Great Basin and Snake River and Columbia River Plateaus. In the area stretching from Northern New Mexico to British Columbia/Alberta there's a lot of different mountain ranges included as part of the Rockies chain, including the Sangre De Cristos, San Juan Mountains, Front Range, Grand Tetons, Wasatch, Bitteroots, Wind River Range, and so on.

The Sierra Nevada and Cascades are seperate from each other geologically, although they run into each other in Northern California and are sometimes considered part of the greater Pacific Mountain System along with the coastal mountain ranges.

I the Poconos and Alleghenies ranges are considered part of the great Applachian Mountain system along with the Blue Ridge, White Mountains, etc... I believe the Ozarks are isolated and geographically and geologically distinct from any other mountain range. The Adirondacks is also distinct from the Applachians and more related to the Canadian Shield area.
The Ozarks are geologically linked to the Appalachians, but they ended up separated from them by the convergence of the Mississippi, Ohio and Tennessee River Valleys.
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