U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 04-04-2013, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Austin, Texas
3,092 posts, read 4,628,078 times
Reputation: 3172

Advertisements

And here comes the overly-pretentious, hypocritical, europe-is-perfect-and-america-sucks gang.

If somebody criticizes the U.S. then Americans are being too sensitive. But like I said, let an American criticize Europe and they are branded uncultured and xenophobic.

Personally, I think both places have their good and bad qualities.
Rate this post positively

 
Old 04-04-2013, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
63,855 posts, read 52,690,299 times
Reputation: 93642
I am American but have lived in Europe and in Asia, and traveled extensively throughout both regions.

I LOVE traveling through, and even living in, different countries - because I have my US passport and know eventually I'll be going home to my favorite country.

But when I'm in other countries, knowing that it's a temporary thing, I revel in the differences. I savor the unique traits of each place I visit. I respect the histories which have created the values and traditions that may seem alien to me. I soak in the cultural differences - take photos, try to speak the language, taste odd foods, avoid the tourist traps and get out into the small towns and countryside. I try to engage in conversations with the natives as often as possible, even if much of that conversation is gesturing or drawing on a napkin. We nearly always end such conversations in smiles and laughter.

The commonality is that we're all human beings. The differences are the icing on the cake.

I like icing.

This guy obviously doesn't. He probably needs to stay home and quit inflicting himself on other nations.

Meanwhile, I'll keep globe trotting - having great fun, experiencing things with a positive outlook, and making friends everywhere I go.

In a few weeks, my husband and I are going to visit the UK. We'll probably tip too much (Oh, the horror - what awful Americans!), we'll alarm people by talking to them in a queue, and we'll definitely look like American tourists, with our camera and our big grins and our Texas accents. We'll have a great time, and frankly I don't care much if a few pretentious people assume that we're GWB supporters, and that we live in a cardboard mansion and both drive Hummers emblazoned with American flags. I am sure that most of the people we meet will be decent and kind hearted - like most of the people in the world.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 04-04-2013, 09:57 AM
 
2,515 posts, read 5,422,454 times
Reputation: 4643
Just got a chance to read throught the entire thing and I gotta say, he makes a lot of excellent points that I agree with. It's funny he mentions the Irish heritage thing. I'm so sick of everyone I know claiming to be of Irish heritage and arguing over who is the most Irish. Apple fanboy's, etc. Truth.
I've never lived outside the US and I've only been to 2 other countries, but even I can see some of the things he brings up as truth. Doesn't make the US a terrible place, but this prentitious attitude that we are perfect is absurd. Accept your faults and weaknesses. We have such an attitude that we must portray perfection that rather than address our issues, we'd rather try and hide them. Sweep them under the rug or hid them in the closet so to speak. I fear that is ultimately going to be our downfall.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 04-04-2013, 10:51 AM
 
361 posts, read 789,496 times
Reputation: 320
As a Belgian in America, I feel more at home here and I think everyone could feel at home in America.
In Europe, it's way harder, you have to act like them to be accepted, they have less tolerance for differences.
And them=same village/city, they even have no tolerance for the people of the next village.
And I like the PC thing, it's good to have a debate but only with friends.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 04-04-2013, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
12,001 posts, read 12,061,786 times
Reputation: 8305
I kind of like reading this guy (maybe it's my Irish genes...lol, kidding)

This was a good read though

29 life lessons learned in travelling the world for 8 years straight - Fluent in 3 months - Language Hacking and Travel Tips
Rate this post positively
 
Old 04-04-2013, 02:29 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
14,827 posts, read 18,578,110 times
Reputation: 38056
I can't take seriously someone who gets bent out of shape over the fact that we smile too much, tip differently, and use a different pricing method than he prefers.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 04-04-2013, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
63,855 posts, read 52,690,299 times
Reputation: 93642
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
I can't take seriously someone who gets bent out of shape over the fact that we smile too much, tip differently, and use a different pricing method than he prefers.
Dang, you got that right. And he has the nerve to say WE'RE too sensitive. Pot, meet kettle!

When in Rome, do as the Romans do. It really doesn't take a whole lot of savvy to read up on local customs, be prepared, and be tolerant of regional differences.

What a boring place the world would be if everyone acted, looked, dressed, or even tipped the same.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 04-04-2013, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
720 posts, read 2,565,471 times
Reputation: 530
As a proud American who's had the opportunity to live in other parts of the world and have a different perspective, I'd say the blogger's observations, though negative and culturally insensitive, are for the most part true.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 04-04-2013, 04:07 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,870 posts, read 20,154,748 times
Reputation: 9234
Quote:
Originally Posted by lndigo View Post
As a proud American who's had the opportunity to live in other parts of the world and have a different perspective, I'd say the blogger's observations, though negative and culturally insensitive, are for the most part true.
I'm American,

I'm not obsessed with money and i'm not always rushed.
Rate this post positively
 
Old 04-04-2013, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
720 posts, read 2,565,471 times
Reputation: 530
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
I'm American,

I'm not obsessed with money and i'm not always rushed.
If anything, I think the author made it a point that (s)he wasn't generalizing nor speaking for every single American. That being said, American culture is, when compared to others at least, oriented to a very large degree on consumerism, money, and efficiency. Have you ever been to Jimmy John's? It's the fastest growing franchise in America right now, and it's appeal is the speed at which you can get a meal.
Rate this post positively
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:49 AM.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top