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Old 05-22-2013, 09:03 PM
 
Location: San Diego
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My city of San Diego got hit with a major wild fire in 2003 and 2007. Over 6,000 total homes burnt down in both disasters combined, and around 20 or so unfortunate deaths. Natural disasters is high on the list of many individuals when deciding to relocate. What natural disasters strike your city? How frequently?
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Old 05-22-2013, 09:43 PM
 
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New Jersey/NYC:

Tropical storms, post tropical storm remnants, nor'easters (bringing heavy snow, blizzards, and severe flooding depending on the season), severe summer thunderstorms with some small tornadoes (not serious ones though), that's really all that's major.

We get at least 2 nor'easters a year on average, lately we've been prone to tropical storms (Hurricanes Irene and Sandy) and summer thunderstorms are pretty regular but small tornadoes are pretty rare. In my town in NJ, we have a river running through it, so during Hurricane Irene my town got destroyed, and there was a 2007 March nor'easter that also ruined my town as well as Hurricane Floyd in 1999. The day after Christmas 2010, a winter nor'easter dumped 32 inches of snow in my area, with snowfall varying from 15 inches to 32 in the whole NYC area. It was crazy. Snowdrifts reached up to 5 feet.

During Irene, we lost a school to floodwaters, another school flooded but not as badly, we lost hundreds of homes and downtown businesses. That was a rough one. My town floods pretty severely if we get enough rain in a short enough period of time and even some constant lighter rain can flood places right on the water. Flooding is definitely the biggest and most common natural disaster in my town, but in my general area all I listed above.
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Old 05-22-2013, 10:40 PM
 
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Minneapolis - St. Paul and the surrounding area gets a lot more flooding than people realize. Downtown St. Paul has flooding problems, and the downtown airport and its runways used to flood over every year before they built flood walls.
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Old 05-22-2013, 10:50 PM
 
Location: East side - Metro ATL
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The Metro area of Atlanta is prone to tornadoes in Winter and Spring mostly, severe thunderstorms in Spring and Summer (Storms with hail, heavy rain and high winds) and Tropical Storms in the Fall. Flooding in the area happens occasionally also with the most extensive event happening in 2009. In addition to all of that, we often receive ice storms in the winter as well.

(
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCpoVDPHcak)


(
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ8Dwptcj8Q)


(
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEiU0_DICu0)
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Old 05-23-2013, 05:44 AM
 
23,800 posts, read 36,401,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
New Jersey/NYC:

Tropical storms, post tropical storm remnants, nor'easters (bringing heavy snow, blizzards, and severe flooding depending on the season), severe summer thunderstorms with some small tornadoes (not serious ones though), that's really all that's major.

We get at least 2 nor'easters a year on average, lately we've been prone to tropical storms (Hurricanes Irene and Sandy) and summer thunderstorms are pretty regular but small tornadoes are pretty rare. In my town in NJ, we have a river running through it, so during Hurricane Irene my town got destroyed, and there was a 2007 March nor'easter that also ruined my town as well as Hurricane Floyd in 1999. The day after Christmas 2010, a winter nor'easter dumped 32 inches of snow in my area, with snowfall varying from 15 inches to 32 in the whole NYC area. It was crazy. Snowdrifts reached up to 5 feet.

During Irene, we lost a school to floodwaters, another school flooded but not as badly, we lost hundreds of homes and downtown businesses. That was a rough one. My town floods pretty severely if we get enough rain in a short enough period of time and even some constant lighter rain can flood places right on the water. Flooding is definitely the biggest and most common natural disaster in my town, but in my general area all I listed above.
I agree, it remains to be seen but due to climactic changes it appears NY/NJ could be the new tropical weather hot spot, instead of my native Florida which hasn't seen any significant damage in nearly 10 years (2004).
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Old 05-23-2013, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE (via SW Virginia)
1,644 posts, read 1,991,252 times
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In Nebraska we are very prone to tornados and periodic flooding.
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Old 05-23-2013, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Durham, NC
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Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Ice Storms

We get more major hurricanes than any state outside the gulf. We get tornadoes pretty much every year, although they're usually not as big or strong as the ones in the great plains.


Raleigh Downtown Tornado as seen from RBC Plaza (26th Floor) 4/16/11 - YouTube - tornado going right through downtown Raleigh.

Ice storms are another big nuisance that crops up every several years. There's generally one every once in a while that knocks out power to a large chunk of the state. The last major one we had was in the winter of 2002-2003. There's been an unsettling lack of them ever since. Maybe global warming has put a stop to those. In which case, I'd expect more of the first two categories, and less of the third.
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Old 05-23-2013, 11:15 AM
 
415 posts, read 703,133 times
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here near (burbs) Chicago, our main natural disaster fear is tornado's ...but the little talked about ticking time bomb is the new Madrid fault line down by St Louis.. It is way over do to let go and because of the soil and lack of bed rock in that area they say if it goes it really rocks n rolls like ocean waves ... So with that said I think about our old under ground lines and rotting over passes, water would be cut off, gas leaks every where and near me is the under ground air port fuel lines that go to Mid Way airport so i see masive fires and water cut off and with a lot of over passes collapsing help would be wayyyy slow to come...

the last time the new madrid let go was 1811 and 1812.... their wasn't much here back then but it was felt in New york...So think about it''
here is a quick vid about the madrid..
http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=...p&fr=yfp-t-900

Last edited by Hickory patrick; 05-23-2013 at 11:47 AM..
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Old 05-23-2013, 11:16 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,284 posts, read 33,708,971 times
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My part of Jersey, up until Irene, Lee and Sandy, wasn't subject to too much. We get large snowstorms but nothing that caused major damage. However those 3 storms really kicked our ass. Irene and Lee caused a lot of flooding and power outages. Snowstorms in October have become a common reality and cause damage because the snow weighs the trees down (which haven't lost their leaves) and caused more power outages. With Sandy, it wasn't flooding, it was wind - we lost 30000 trees in my town alone. My kids' school was out for 2 weeks because of power outages. I'm very fortunate b/c we only lost power for 2 days during Sandy, it helps being on the same grid as the hospital. And we are on the top of a hill so we don't flood at all.

In all my years of living here I've never seen so many destructive storms as in the past 2 years.
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Old 05-23-2013, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Seattle, Washington
3,733 posts, read 7,169,840 times
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Earthquakes here in Seattle.
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