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Old 11-19-2007, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,976 posts, read 18,417,369 times
Reputation: 6688

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I understand how people from outside the area might think New Yorkers are rude. I perpetuated that stereotype on Saturday, when a family of tourists stopped at the bottom of an escalator that was packed with people going downstairs. You can't do that. Bodies are going to start piling up! So I asked them nicely to keep moving. They didn't. At this point I was practically on top of one of them. I gave her a slight nudge and said forcefully, "keep moving please!" She looked so offended, but she just didn't realize that you cannot stand in front of a flowing river of people who are incapable of stopping for you. So now I'm sure she went home and talked about the rude New Yorker who pushed her.


Anyway, I live in Jersey. Our stereotypes: We're all Tony Soprano, the state is an industrial wasteland, we breathe drink and eat toxic pollutants, we're loud-mouths, and we spend too much time at the shore.

In short, we all go down the shore and do the guido fist pump to this playlist... Fun Zone

...while dressed and gelled like these nuts:
http://www.gatorswearjeanshorts.net/TheGuido.jpg (broken link)
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Old 11-19-2007, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Uniquely Individual Villages of the Megalopolis
646 posts, read 746,165 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScrantonWilkesBarre View Post
I'm sure 9/11 made people more willing to help one another as well. The extreme outpouring of compassion after that tragedy was immense.

Things got a lot tighter after 9/11 but people actually were less uptight and very high spirited before it. NY was better, people were very contented and more fun because it had been enjoying a good business cycle and the Giuliani years had a very beneficial effect that had cleaned the city up, Times Square had become Disneyfied, to hear of a murder somewhere was very rare. If you did hear of something bad happening it would grab the attention of the whole city it seemed with concern. The City since that election day of 9/11 has hung in there surprisingly well, considering and as you say people pulled together. Believe me, NY was "Fun City" before.

But that experience also helped during the big blackout and power grid failure in the hot summer of 2003 not even two hours later. No one rioted, no one looted.

NY will rebound altogether for even better heights over the near future coming years.
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Old 11-19-2007, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Uniquely Individual Villages of the Megalopolis
646 posts, read 746,165 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
I understand how people from outside the area might think New Yorkers are rude. I perpetuated that stereotype on Saturday, when a family of tourists stopped at the bottom of an escalator that was packed with people going downstairs. You can't do that. Bodies are going to start piling up! So I asked them nicely to keep moving. They didn't. At this point I was practically on top of one of them. I gave her a slight nudge and said forcefully, "keep moving please!" She looked so offended, but she just didn't realize that you cannot stand in front of a flowing river of people who are incapable of stopping for you. So now I'm sure she went home and talked about the rude New Yorker who pushed her.


Anyway, I live in Jersey. Our stereotypes: We're all Tony Soprano, the state is an industrial wasteland, we breathe drink and eat toxic pollutants, we're loud-mouths, and we spend too much time at the shore.

In short, we all go down the shore and do the guido fist pump to this playlist... Fun Zone

...while dressed and gelled like these nuts:
http://www.gatorswearjeanshorts.net/TheGuido.jpg (broken link)


I'll be going to Atlantic City on Wed for the weekend. Look out Jersey here we come!!
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Old 11-19-2007, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Uniquely Individual Villages of the Megalopolis
646 posts, read 746,165 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenOR View Post
Hey guys, lets not get mad! That's not the point of this thread or this post. I understand that stereotypes can be offensive and all, but we don't have to fit these stereotypes. Yeah? Not every person in NYC is rude; some are very nice! Not every person in SoCal is superficial. It it just how others perceive us. I mean, honest, not everyone in PacNW is some stoner hippy, but that's what some people think. I am just really interested in what others think of my region, along with others. Sometimes it can be offensive, but don't get angry because it just shows that some people do not know us, yeah? It is our point here to show others what we are truly about. Don't get angry, just show them.

I work with a guy from Corvallis, OR wouldn't you know. Returned from Holland last year and lives in NYC.

Isn't Corvallis also the home of Chris Botti? Great Musician and he's going to be at one of NY"s prime Jazz clubs in December.
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Old 11-19-2007, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Wallace, Idaho
3,354 posts, read 6,445,960 times
Reputation: 3568
OK, I'll play. I'll limit myself to the cities I know a little bit about.

Detroit: Dying, dirty, crime-ridden, symbol of the declining American auto indsutry.

Chicago: A place where people love their sports teams (and if you're a Cubs fan, you're among the most long-suffering fans in the world). Associated with deep-dish pizza, blues music, elevated trains, Navy Pier, Sears Tower, and the Magnificent Mile. The New York of the Midwest.

Indianapolis: Other than the Indy 500 and the Colts, I don't think people have much of an impression of Indy, except as a place you drive through to get somewhere else.

Louisville: Cosmopolitan, southern hospitality, mint juleps, the Kentucky Derby.

DC: The place where politicians and lobbyists run amok.

Boston: The American Revolution, the Red Sox, and bad traffic.

Phliadelphia: Cradle of liberty ... Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell. Philly cheesesteaks, obnoxious sports fans (they booed Santa Claus!), generally a dirty city.

In keeping with the spirit of the post, I think this is what OTHER people think of when they think of these cities, not necessarily what I do. Although there is some overlap in some cases.
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Old 11-19-2007, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Uniquely Individual Villages of the Megalopolis
646 posts, read 746,165 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by YoAdrian View Post
OK, I'll play. I'll limit myself to the cities I know a little bit about.

Detroit: Dying, dirty, crime-ridden, symbol of the declining American auto indsutry.

Chicago: A place where people love their sports teams (and if you're a Cubs fan, you're among the most long-suffering fans in the world). Associated with deep-dish pizza, blues music, elevated trains, Navy Pier, Sears Tower, and the Magnificent Mile. The New York of the Midwest.

Indianapolis: Other than the Indy 500 and the Colts, I don't think people have much of an impression of Indy, except as a place you drive through to get somewhere else.

Louisville: Cosmopolitan, southern hospitality, mint juleps, the Kentucky Derby.

DC: The place where politicians and lobbyists run amok.

Boston: The American Revolution, the Red Sox, and bad traffic.

Phliadelphia: Cradle of liberty ... Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell. Philly cheesesteaks, obnoxious sports fans (they booed Santa Claus!), generally a dirty city.

In keeping with the spirit of the post, I think this is what OTHER people think of when they think of these cities, not necessarily what I do. Although there is some overlap in some cases.

What feeling do you get when and if you go down to Williamsburg? Is that Southern or colonial like Phila. It was key like Boston during the Revolution and later Phila.
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Old 11-19-2007, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Wallace, Idaho
3,354 posts, read 6,445,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StuyTownRefugee View Post
What feeling do you get when and if you go down to Williamsburg? Is that Southern or colonial like Phila. It was key like Boston during the Revolution and later Phila.
Interesting question! I do associate it more with the colonial era, mainly because of the commercials I see for Williamsburg tourism around here. They always seem to show re-enactors walking around in their tri-cornrered hats and firing off muskets. However, I've never actually been there ...
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Old 11-19-2007, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,976 posts, read 18,417,369 times
Reputation: 6688
Williamsburg is cute but it's also a tourist trap. It's colonial America re-created and the kids can learn a lot from the experience of going. Outside the Duke of Gloucester Street colonial village, there are a lot of outlet malls, amusement parks, and Courtyard Inns. And unfortunately I think most people don't realize that the buildings in Colonial Williamsburg were all built in the 1930s.
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Old 11-19-2007, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Uniquely Individual Villages of the Megalopolis
646 posts, read 746,165 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by YoAdrian View Post
Interesting question! I do associate it more with the colonial era, mainly because of the commercials I see for Williamsburg tourism around here. They always seem to show re-enactors walking around in their tri-cornrered hats and firing off muskets. However, I've never actually been there ...


The only reason I mentioned is that it serves as a good educational experience in the Information Centers etc, the films, etc on America and Virginia in their formation, long before any Civil War.

It's much more than Amusement Parks like Bush Gardens etc the original ideas and info you find at the Centers on the Parkways, that is what people always went there for before the Theme Parks. Plus there is Yorktown, they call this area the Historic Triangle, Jamestown, Yorktown, and W'mburg.

Doesn't sound like you've been living around the area very long. They gear a lot of the advert to up here in the New York market.

My wife being from Boston loves all that history and Paul Revere spirit. Early Va was before other states like KY, Tennesee, etc were formed out of the original colony and originally it went all the way to MInnesota. I think you might know that. It's all probably new to you since you're from a small MW town.
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Old 11-19-2007, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Wallace, Idaho
3,354 posts, read 6,445,960 times
Reputation: 3568
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuyTownRefugee View Post
The only reason I mentioned is that it serves as a good educational experience in the Information Centers etc, the films, etc on America and Virginia in their formation, long before any Civil War.

It's much more than Amusement Parks like Bush Gardens etc the original ideas and info you find at the Centers on the Parkways, that is what people always went there for before the Theme Parks. Plus there is Yorktown, they call this area the Historic Triangle, Jamestown, Yorktown, and W'mburg.

Doesn't sound like you've been living around the area very long. They gear a lot of the advert to up here in the New York market.

My wife being from Boston loves all that history and Paul Revere spirit. Early Va was before other states like KY, Tennesee, etc were formed out of the original colony and originally it went all the way to MInnesota. I think you might know that. It's all probably new to you since you're from a small MW town.
Oh, yes, I love studying American history. My native Michigan was once part of Virginia. I'm a huge fan of Thomas Jefferson, and it was him, the history of the state, and comparisons I made among VA, MD, and DC before I came out here that led to our setting in VA. I've been to Monticello and Poplar Forest and felt in awe the whole time. Still need to make it to Mount Vernon, though. Funny we haven't been there, since it's just down the road from us.

We got here in the fall of '03. I've enjoyed exploring Virginia (outside the DC area) and taking in the tourist sights around DC. But as you know (if you've been following my posts), we'll be gone in a little more than a year. It's been an interesting ride, but our future is not here.
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