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Old 11-19-2007, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,402 posts, read 27,881,891 times
Reputation: 19085

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OK, I'll try a few. I won't attempt the music references, though, since I'm an old geezer who listens to the oldies station.

Washington DC: Aggressive, type A, rudeness that makes New Yorkers look like amateurs. Everything, yes EVERYTHING is about politics and power.

Maryland suburbs of DC (Montgomery County): Crime. Some pockets of serious money. Driven, and often very well-educated. Smokers. False arrogance--they think they're better than VA. Who do do they think they're kidding (ha ha).

Virginia suburbs of DC: Horses. Estates. Lots of family nearby. Beige--and proud of it. Less education (BA and MBAs--not doctorates), less drive, and much more money. Go figure.

(Note, the inner suburbs of Virginia actually deserve the description given to the MD suburbs.)

Rehoboth Beach: Supposedly a very gay area. I actually see more gay people in Ocean City--and hardly ever in Rehoboth.

Charlottesville: Relatively laid back (compared to NOVA). Book readers, artsy, respect for education (even if people have not personally achieved much education).

Richmond: Crime. split personality that's sometimes very tense, sometimes polite & gentile. Hot, humid, buggy.

Williamsburg: Retirees and college kids employeed as actors in a large colonial village that is open to the public and part of the town. Hot & buggy. Having bags o' money makes all the difference in quality of life here.

Norfolk/Newport News: Industrial. Dirty. Strip malls and run down neighborhoods. Impressive bridges.

Charlotte: Frantic, building boom run amok. Transitional. Friendly people will invite you to a neighborhood barbecue... and your neighbors will then try to get you to invest in a business venture. Nascar.

Miami: Glitzy, loud, over-the-top and lovin' it. Passionate, volatile sometimes violent. Weather can be hard on buildings and marriages--seems like everything breaks down in a few years.
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Old 11-19-2007, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Uniquely Individual Villages of the Megalopolis
646 posts, read 745,147 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
OK, I'll try a few. I won't attempt the music references, though, since I'm an old geezer who listens to the oldies station.

Washington DC: Aggressive, type A, rudeness that makes New Yorkers look like amateurs. Everything, yes EVERYTHING is about politics and power.

Maryland suburbs of DC (Montgomery County): Crime. Some pockets of serious money. Driven, and often very well-educated. Smokers. False arrogance--they think they're better than VA. Who do do they think they're kidding (ha ha).

Virginia suburbs of DC: Horses. Estates. Lots of family nearby. Beige--and proud of it. Less education (BA and MBAs--not doctorates), less drive, and much more money. Go figure.

(Note, the inner suburbs of Virginia actually deserve the description given to the MD suburbs.)

Rehoboth Beach: Supposedly a very gay area. I actually see more gay people in Ocean City--and hardly ever in Rehoboth.

Charlottesville: Relatively laid back (compared to NOVA). Book readers, artsy, respect for education (even if people have not personally achieved much education).

Richmond: Crime. split personality that's sometimes very tense, sometimes polite & gentile. Hot, humid, buggy.

Williamsburg: Retirees and college kids employeed as actors in a large colonial village that is open to the public and part of the town. Hot & buggy. Having bags o' money makes all the difference in quality of life here.

Norfolk/Newport News: Industrial. Dirty. Strip malls and run down neighborhoods. Impressive bridges.

Charlotte: Frantic, building boom run amok. Transitional. Friendly people will invite you to a neighborhood barbecue... and your neighbors will then try to get you to invest in a business venture. Nascar.

Miami: Glitzy, loud, over-the-top and lovin' it. Passionate, volatile sometimes violent. Weather can be hard on buildings and marriages--seems like everything breaks down in a few years.

That is so great and creative a run down. LOL!! Especially about the Va suburbs of DC, a lot less crime too than the MD side. It always seemed MD side lives to run VA down. "The Old Line State", for sure.
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Old 11-19-2007, 01:47 PM
 
Location: somewhere between Florida and New England
333 posts, read 427,072 times
Reputation: 79
I'll do a couple satellite cities between New York and Boston -

Stamford, CT - Cosmopolitan, wealthy country clubbers mixed with young urban professionals, no accent and very fast paced. Type A. Pricey real estate (if it's cheap, there's a reason). High school students drive nicer cars than the teachers. Basically, New York's 'better looking' sister.

New Haven, CT - Rich college kids mixed with very poor minorities. To people in Connecticut, New Haven is "ghetto," but to many outsiders, New Haven is a yuppie town with lots of Yalies near NYC. No accents except for a few New York transplants. The area is very fast paced and Type A. It's Irish/Italian and the residents can be considered rude to people from other areas, while people here think it's the norm. A very big wealth gap in this area - either very poor minorities or wealthy white communities where schools are top notch. People here are nice if you catch them on a good day.

Providence, RI - One of the slower-paced cities in the Northeast. Very Italian and home to your average Joe. Lots of upscale college kids within from all over the country. Accent is more Boston than New York and real estate here, while pricey, is reasonable compared to other areas. Friendly people but very blunt (think Family Guy!).
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Old 11-19-2007, 01:57 PM
 
1,969 posts, read 6,204,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tande1n5 View Post
I don't know about San Francisco being slow-paced like the OP said. It's very competitive and cutthroat in SF's professional realm, and people hustle as much as anywhere... the indie, slow paced stuff only happens on people's days off. I might even say it's faster paced than LA, it's just not being done at 100mph in your car on a freeway.
Agree. Silicon Valley and SF are very cutthroat. I know people who work from 6 to 1. That's am to am with only a couple hours sleep, 6 to 7 days a week (granted they get big $$$, but why would anyone want that kind of life)? There are a large number of trust fund types too. Not many younger hippies- that is pretty much limited to the old folks. Very wealthy and upwardly mobile city.

Stereotypes:
Seattle- shy intellectual snobs drinking too much coffee
DC- politics obsessed climbers
NYC- $$$$
West LA- Flashy $$$$
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Old 11-19-2007, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,402 posts, read 27,881,891 times
Reputation: 19085
"It always seemed MD side lives to run VA down."

That's ok, plenty of people in VA laugh at MD people and their arrogance. I volunteer for a local hospital, and when the news comes on, I like to ask the patients what's new in the news. You be surprised how many people sound almost gleeful when relating that there's been another crime or act of stupidity in what is commonly called "Monkey County."
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Old 11-19-2007, 02:05 PM
 
1,606 posts, read 3,801,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xavierob82 View Post
I still never understood why people who visit the Northeast claim the people here are "rude". Sure, we may not make eye contact and say hello, but have you ever stopped to think that its because we see people everywhere everyday. We can't just nod and say hi to everyone we pass by on the street, you know. it would get very tiring.
But Northeastern people have the time to act rude and arrogant, give pompous and angry looks, and flick and curse anyone out for the most insignificant inconveniences. I can sort of understand how rushing for the sake of having a busy schedule can prohibit people enough time to be generous and can be misconceived as being rude, but if one is too busy being nice, shouldn't the same application apply of being too busy to be arrogant and hateful? Or is it just me who realizes this?
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Old 11-19-2007, 02:25 PM
 
Location: somewhere between Florida and New England
333 posts, read 427,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Fairfaxian View Post
But Northeastern people have the time to act rude and arrogant, give pompous and angry looks, and flick and curse anyone out for the most insignificant inconveniences. I can sort of understand how rushing for the sake of having a busy schedule can prohibit people enough time to be generous and can be misconceived as being rude, but if one is too busy being nice, shouldn't the same application apply of being too busy to be arrogant and hateful? Or is it just me who realizes this?
Those who claim rudeness usually don't understand what true "rudeness" is.

The stereotype of the Northeast comes largely from New York City. Fast paced, loud, go, go, go. The suburbs are the same way, obviously due to proximity.

Not making eye-contact and not saying 'hello' isn't rude. It's efficient. Why stop and say hi to every stranger you meet? If all New Yorkers did this, it'd be one heck of a soap opera. Keep in mind people, New York isn't small town Maryland or Virginia and neither are it's suburbs. 1 in 13 people lives in greater New York - the same cannot be said for any other city.

So before you claim rudeness, try to open your mind and educate yourself as to why people do what they do. You'll quickly find out that it isn't rude, and the definition of rudeness has nothing to do with eye-contact, holding doors or making small talk with a stranger.

As for the dirty looks and hand gestures, try to keep up with the flow of traffic.
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Old 11-19-2007, 02:30 PM
 
Location: moving again
4,382 posts, read 16,342,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post

Maryland suburbs of DC (Montgomery County): Crime. Some pockets of serious money. Driven, and often very well-educated. Smokers. False arrogance--they think they're better than VA. Who do do they think they're kidding (ha ha).
you seem to have a problem with Maryland. So i will defend it. yes, there is crime, most of it is not in Montgomery county though, its in PG. But there is definently crime in VA too. Smokers? Never heard that at all. Seriously, I lived in Montgomery co for a while and they in NO WAY WHATSOEVER think they are better than VA, although I would choose montgomery co over any NOVA county and Im not biased, im not even originally from MD



Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
Rehoboth Beach: Supposedly a very gay area. I actually see more gay people in Ocean City--and hardly ever in Rehoboth.
You have obviously never ventured around the town, if you did, you would have seen Gay flags on tons of Shops and gay bars as well as gay parties

I've actually never seen any gay people in Ocean city that i can remember

no that being gay is a bad thing, though

Edit: oh yeah, and I forgot to mention that I've noticed much more snottiness in VA than In MD, the people THERE are the ones that think they are better than Maryland

Last edited by Billiam; 11-19-2007 at 02:55 PM..
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Old 11-19-2007, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Uniquely Individual Villages of the Megalopolis
646 posts, read 745,147 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
"It always seemed MD side lives to run VA down."

That's ok, plenty of people in VA laugh at MD people and their arrogance. I volunteer for a local hospital, and when the news comes on, I like to ask the patients what's new in the news. You be surprised how many people sound almost gleeful when relating that there's been another crime or act of stupidity in what is commonly called "Monkey County."

It's a tense topic apparently. Get this. I was at a wake in Boston a few years ago when my m-i-l died. I met my wife's cousin who came up from Potomac, MD. I mentioned I traveled to the area and have spent time there. She immediately warned me about VA, and how it took back part of DC, which I don't know if all that is true, like Don't go there. I just listened, but thought what a strange topic at a pre-funeral time with the funeral about to ensue. Her whole conversation then as now we rarely talk but it's if we are coming to visit, she steers the topic to Virginia as if it is paramount in her life in the sense she lives to marginalize it. I don't get it. It's an extreme. But there is a general tendency to do that with there yet so many from there work in VA. Is there that much jealousy and rivalry? We have family on both sides and all are originally from inside DC itself, MacArthur Blvd area. Which used to be my fav part of the city.
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Old 11-19-2007, 02:45 PM
 
1,606 posts, read 3,801,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sliver203 View Post
Not making eye-contact and not saying 'hello' isn't rude. It's efficient. Why stop and say hi to every stranger you meet? If all New Yorkers did this, it'd be one heck of a soap opera...
I'm not arguing that not making eye-contact and not saying 'hello' is rude. I can understand how those things are not efficient in the sense of time. However, making the antisocial gestures is something commonplace, even in a rushed place like where I am. And the rudeness just doesn't occur when one's busy or rushing to get from Point A to Point B.
Quote:
Keep in mind people, New York isn't small town Maryland or Virginia and neither are it's suburbs.
Have you been to the Washington DC area? Maybe we're not as big as the NYC Tristate, but DC and its suburbs are hardly considered "small towns"
Quote:
So before you claim rudeness, try to open your mind and educate yourself as to why people do what they do. You'll quickly find out that it isn't rude, and the definition of rudeness has nothing to do with eye-contact, holding doors or making small talk with a stranger.

As for the dirty looks and hand gestures, try to keep up with the flow of traffic.
Trust me when I say the rude looks ans gestures can come from individuals when they're even in the most comfortable of situations. When it comes to meeting people, individuals in this region tend to be the most standoffish and unwilling. But in general, it's these same individuals who are the extreme A-Types that will try to get the most attention in the most obnoxious and arrogant ways.

And as for the picture of the guys and girls at the bar w/ the greased hair and slutty clothing, that basically sums up how people are every weekend (and most weekday nights) at the university I attend.
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