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Old 12-01-2013, 10:24 PM
 
Location: East coast
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As the country becomes more culturally diverse by immigration, many new immigrants bring their languages with them and pass it on to their children. Some of this is pretty recent (eg. first or second generation) and it is often lost in a few generations.

What are some examples that have persisted over a large number of generations?

I know for instance, it's rare to get Italian speakers among the older Italian-Americans of the northeast whose family came through Ellis Island, and Yiddish is in decline too among many Jewish-Americans, though it's still cool to meet people who can still speak the language of their grandma and grandpa or possibly family history further back.
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Old 12-01-2013, 10:26 PM
 
Location: East coast
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Whoops... I realized I spelled Louisiana wrong!
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Old 12-01-2013, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Louisiana to Houston to Denver to NOVA
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Cajun French is still spoken in Lafayette and Cajun Country, along Hwy 90 in south Louisiana. A state program has been established to help keep and grow the language in the state. It's a shame it came so close to extinction. Creole French is nearly gone, and I don't know if there is a program in the New Orleans area to help foster the language. I think Louisiana and Parisian French should be mandatory classes from kindergarten to highschool.
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Old 12-02-2013, 12:48 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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A lot of Mexican Americans who have been here for generations still speak Spanish, especially in places like South Texas. Some of them did live there before Texas became part of the U.S. I know people from the Tex-Mex border who still speak with a pronounced Mexican accent despite being born in the US. I think the same is true for Florida with the Cubans.
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Old 12-02-2013, 01:14 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
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There is still a significant francophone community in northern Maine. Also, not immigrant based but I have heard plains indian languages spoken in Minneapolis a couple times - probably Ojibwe or Dakota.
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Old 12-02-2013, 02:09 AM
 
Location: south central
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The Portuguese-speaking community on the South Coast of Massachusetts (around New Bedford and Fall River). Mostly Azorean Portuguese, they began to immigrate to the area around the 1850s, and because Massachusetts is so close to the Azores, especially now with plane travel, this has allowed the community, despite being present here for about 160 years at least, to remain connected with the home Islands, and has kept the use of the language alive and has allowed the community to maintain and immigrant character for so long, despite the fact that many of the people's families have been in America for generations.
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Old 12-02-2013, 05:10 AM
 
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Definitely the Chinese and Vietnamese as well as other SE Asian countries such as Burma/Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia though in much smaller numbers than the first two. Their traditions run fairly deep and don't get lost through generations.
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Old 12-02-2013, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Dunno about America, but here the language often gets 'lost' in one, let alone a few generations.
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Old 12-02-2013, 06:47 AM
 
Location: New York NY
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I believe there are still numbers of people in coastal S. Carolina and Georgia speaking Gullah, an African-English dialect from slavery days. IIRC, the African language is one from Sierra Leone
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Old 12-02-2013, 10:03 AM
 
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There are still old Italians here that speak the language, with many coming after WW2. It may just be a matter of how long ago the people immigrated over, but such old timers are still around.
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