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Old 02-02-2014, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
67,650 posts, read 60,925,505 times
Reputation: 101078

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Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
I watch a lot of HGTV, and when one of the shows comes on that doesn't identify where the homeowners/buyers are from, I can always tell if the show is in Canada within the first minute of them opening their mouths. The hosts on that network who are Canadian also have obvious Canadian accents. About the only native of Ontario that I have ever had to listen extremely closely to to discern his accent is Alex Trebek, but then I think he has spent years on American TV consciously trying to sound like an American. Michael J. Fox has a very discernable Canadian accent.

We only live about an hour from the Detroit/Windsor border and visit Canada from time to time. The things I notice the most are the "oat and aboat", the "I'm sorey, but I will be out of that product until tomoreow. When I get some more in, they will cost ten dolers", and the "eh" (I hear this one a lot, even in southern Ontario!)

Canadians are extremely nice people as a rule, their country is neat and pretty, and who really cares if they talk with an accent? Personally, I find it charming.
Augh, that's right - I forgot about the "dolers" thing!

 
Old 02-02-2014, 02:51 PM
 
3,451 posts, read 3,911,671 times
Reputation: 1675
My Aunt my marriage is from Montreal and she does have a accent
 
Old 02-02-2014, 03:50 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,119 posts, read 6,605,145 times
Reputation: 4544
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
He is from Michigan of course he has. Everyone in Michigan sees (and hears) Canadians, and many Michigan people see them daily. Everyone has an accent, no matter where you live and Canadians are no different.
Thank you DanielJ. I know you used to live up here, so you understand. I live less than two hours from Canada and I've been there multiple times. The accent is obvious as soon as I talk to the Canadian border guard on the other side of the bridge. Every time. It is the most obvious example of the difference when you talk to an American on one side of the bridge and a Canadian on the other. I hear both accents within a matter of seconds and there is a clear difference.
 
Old 02-02-2014, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Canada
142 posts, read 219,956 times
Reputation: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Right.

How do you say "roof?" How do you say "about?"
I say roof like "rewf" and about like "uhh-bout' (as in shout).
 
Old 02-02-2014, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Edmonds, WA
8,975 posts, read 10,212,799 times
Reputation: 14252
Some things I've heard:

about = aboat
sorry = soary
against = agaynst (or maybe it's that Americans tend to say it more like "agenst")
 
Old 02-02-2014, 04:06 PM
 
4,861 posts, read 9,310,229 times
Reputation: 7762
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
It's important to recognize, however, that there isn't just one "Canadian" accent. Whenever you have 35 million people stretched over 3.5 million square miles, settled by persons from different countries of origin, you're going to hear variations in how people speak.

On city-data we often talk about "southern" accents or "northern" accents, but we recognize that there are variations within each of those regions (though the differences within each region may be harder to distinguish for someone who isn't from there). Same has to be true in Canada. Try being from Calgary and trying to communicate with a Newfie.

The OP has an accent (everyone has an accent of some kind). It may not be the hockey accent most Americans think of, but I bet if 100 people from the US listened to the OP speak for a few minutes, they'd hear some giveaway to his/her origin.

One example for fun, this is Sandra Rinomato, born and raised in Toronto, had a popular HGTV show "Property Virgins" until a couple of years ago. She's a city woman, well educated, does business in Canada and the US, and isn't from some backwater. Yet you can tell just by listening to her for a minute or two that she's not from the US. It may be hard to tell at first, but there are several things she says that people south of the border would notice as different (and probably somehow Canadian).

Here's a video:
Sandra Rinomato - Realty Check Video - YouTube
Just a few things I noticed listening for the first two minutes (I didn't even finish the video):
0:23 "mouths" = "moaths"
0:32 "not = "noat" or is it more like "nawt" couldn't tell but it sounded different
0:51 "dollars" = "dole-ars"
0:52 "house" = "hoase"
1:01 "out" = "oat"
1:23 "house" = "hoase" again, twice more in rapid succession
1:58 "a lot" = "a loat"
and so on...
Yes! Sandra Rinomato is a great example of an educated, professional Canadian on HGTV who has a strong Canadian accent. And so what if she does? It doesn't detract from her professionalism or her intelligence. If anything, it gives her character and makes her more memorable.
 
Old 02-02-2014, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Canada
142 posts, read 219,956 times
Reputation: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
The people on HGTV that I am referring to are both the home buyers/sellers and the licensed professionals who assist them. Most of the buyers on these shows are actually city dwellers from around Toronto who are educated professionals. Who else could afford to pay over $500,000 for a 1,200 sq. ft. attached house?

I was referring to Michael J. Fox back when he was a pre-Parkinson guy in his early twenties on "Family Ties". He pronounced "tomorrow" like "tomoreow", and "sorry" like "sorey".

Canadians most definitely do have a noticeable Canadian accent. What I can't figure out is why it bothers you so much for people to tell you that. If I was Canadian, I certainly would not care, it would be one of the things that made me uniquely Canadian. It's not like it's an annoying or ugly accent. Like I said, I find it quite charming, much as I find it charming that you call your rest stops along the expressways "en routes" and have French translations on every road sign. Canada is not the U.S., nor should it try to be. Canada is just fine being Canada...eh?
Well maybe that's just an area in Toronto where the accent is stronger? I don't know what else to say.

It bothers me truthfully because I would prefer to have an American accent - which I believe this is the accent I already have to begin with. I wouldn't want to "sound" Canadian at all if what you just described about our accent is true in terms the funny vowel sounds ect.
 
Old 02-02-2014, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
7,055 posts, read 19,309,136 times
Reputation: 6917
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxie89 View Post
Well maybe that's just an area in Toronto where the accent is stronger? I don't know what else to say.

It bothers me truthfully because I would prefer to have an American accent - which I believe this is the accent I already have to begin with. I wouldn't want to "sound" Canadian at all if what you just described about our accent is true in terms the funny vowel sounds ect.
WHICH American accent would you prefer to have?
 
Old 02-02-2014, 06:57 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,773 posts, read 21,500,362 times
Reputation: 9263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxie89 View Post
Well maybe that's just an area in Toronto where the accent is stronger? I don't know what else to say.

It bothers me truthfully because I would prefer to have an American accent - which I believe this is the accent I already have to begin with. I wouldn't want to "sound" Canadian at all if what you just described about our accent is true in terms the funny vowel sounds ect.
You probably have a Minnesota accent
 
Old 02-02-2014, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
14,353 posts, read 17,030,476 times
Reputation: 12411
Canadian accents sound nearly nothing like what Americans tend to think they do (the average American comes up with something midway between Duluth and Dublin), but to someone who actually knows what a Canadian accent is (e.g., an American who has known a lot of Canadians, or vice versa) you can easily pick them out.

Fifty years ago, there was probably comparably little difference between Canadian accents and nearby Upper Midwestern U.S. accents. But that region in the U.S. has seen huge shifts in vowel pronunciation since then because of the Northern Cities Vowel Shift. No city in Canada has had this shift, so today there are stark differences when you cross the border.

The "standard Canadian" accent does get weaker the further west you go, however. Arguably there is relatively little difference between a Vancouver and Seattle accent, to the point that both share more in common with each other than with the stereotyped national accents.
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