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Old 04-25-2014, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,515 posts, read 15,946,651 times
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It seems like most people I know, end up leaving their home metro area for another area (usually an exciting city or some other area) at some point during or after college. But then, later on, maybe 5-10 years (give or take) down the road, they move back to where they came from. Are there any statistics on this type of migration?

Forget about retirees. I'm only talking about people who have not yet retired, or have moved due to reasons other than retirement.
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Old 11-10-2014, 01:11 AM
 
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There is actually a plethora of information on this subject but to simplify it the number comes to about 80% of adult males/females ages 25-35 end up moving back to their hometown. The most common reason to move in the first place is of course college and the leading cause after 25 is due to finding a job outside the persons hometown. The "honeymoon phase" of the new job lasts about 2-4 months and then at that point the initial thoughts of returning to home kick in. However, since the person has already made such a financial leap and cut ties with previous jobs in their hometown to simply transition into their old situation is nearly impossible. Furthermore 60% of people surveyed cited that them returning within a year after leaving their hometown to be viewed as an embarrassment and a failure to friends and family. Less common reason to move is due to a promising relationship which is at 13% although not a high percentage this is still noteworthy. After the age 35 the majority of people move back to be caretakers for their family or due to a family death.

I hope this helps. The total percentage of people who move back is debated among the various sources consulted and readily available to an average of 22% move back from 20-25, 58% from 25-35, 35-death 10% move back, and 10% end up setting up a new fort for future generations.
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Old 11-10-2014, 01:13 AM
 
2 posts, read 14,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
It seems like most people I know, end up leaving their home metro area for another area (usually an exciting city or some other area) at some point during or after college. But then, later on, maybe 5-10 years (give or take) down the road, they move back to where they came from. Are there any statistics on this type of migration?

Forget about retirees. I'm only talking about people who have not yet retired, or have moved due to reasons other than retirement.
There is actually a plethora of information on this subject but to simplify it the number comes to about 80% of adult males/females ages 25-35 end up moving back to their hometown. The most common reason to move in the first place is of course college and the leading cause after 25 is due to finding a job outside the persons hometown. The "honeymoon phase" of the new job lasts about 2-4 months and then at that point the initial thoughts of returning to home kick in. However, since the person has already made such a financial leap and cut ties with previous jobs in their hometown to simply transition into their old situation is nearly impossible. Furthermore 60% of people surveyed cited that them returning within a year after leaving their hometown to be viewed as an embarrassment and a failure to friends and family. Less common reason to move is due to a promising relationship which is at 13% although not a high percentage this is still noteworthy. After the age 35 the majority of people move back to be caretakers for their family or due to a family death.

I hope this helps. The total percentage of people who move back is debated among the various sources consulted and readily available to an average of 22% move back from 20-25, 58% from 25-35, 35-death 10% move back, and 10% end up setting up a new fort for future generations.
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Old 11-10-2014, 04:28 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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You see that with cities now. I have read several articles where the youth move in to the hip downtowns but leave once they get to the family stage. A reversal is starting to happen with the recent gentrification of cities. The suburbs are showing growth again. In fact, it is happening here in Pittsburgh. The downtown neighborhoods were white hot but are slowing down. The suburbs are showing the fastest growth. Another article stated the boomers are moving to the exurbs.
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Old 11-10-2014, 06:41 AM
 
23,614 posts, read 35,963,263 times
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There's also the widespread Halfback Syndrome where people move from someplace North to somewhere in the South only to realize the move was too extreme in terms of weather and culture.

From an article in New Geography:

"North Carolina and South Carolina: North Carolina ranked third, adding 41,000 net domestic migrants. This is an improvement from a fourth-place ranking in the previous decade. Neighboring South Carolina added 22,000 net domestic migrants and ranked sixth. This is an improvement from the previous decade's ranking of seventh. The domestic migrants to North Carolina and South Carolina have been called "halfbacks," as some have suggested that many who had moved to Florida from the Northeast have subsequently moved to North Carolina and South Carolina, essentially one half of the way back to where they moved from originally."

Tennessee has also seen similar growth.
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Old 11-10-2014, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
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I am so happy that suburbs are starting to make a comeback. Urban life is severely overrated. Been there, done that.
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Old 11-10-2014, 07:50 AM
 
69,392 posts, read 96,177,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I am so happy that suburbs are starting to make a comeback. Urban life is severely overrated. Been there, done that.
It depends on where you live in a city, as there many areas of cities that have SFH's with yards.
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Old 11-10-2014, 09:14 AM
 
1 posts, read 6,945 times
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I disagree with you Salazar68 I have a feeling you are racist
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Old 11-10-2014, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
30,098 posts, read 29,763,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
It depends on where you live in a city, as there many areas of cities that have SFH's with yards.
I grew up in a small city in a SFH with a small back yard. It was OK. There was nothing I could do about it.

Anyway, nep, I didn't move out of my home town until I was well into my 20s--and I never went back.
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Old 11-10-2014, 09:57 AM
 
Location: In the hot spot!
3,756 posts, read 5,712,312 times
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nep, I grew up in the Northeast and loved my childhood there. So many fond memories, but as I grew into an adult those things weren't enough to hold me there so I moved away. Having been away for quite a while now there are some things I do miss, but I don't see myself ever moving back to the area. We have family there and visit as often as we can so I appreciate it from that perspective nowadays.
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