Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
2,500,000 members. Thank you!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-22-2007, 12:34 PM
 
5,947 posts, read 13,001,950 times
Reputation: 4793

Advertisements

Yes,

Do you think the "sunbelt" is kind of a meaningless term?

It encompasses everything in the southern states ranging from Florida to California, but the physical is completely different.

People equate warmer winters automatically with "sun"

Florida to the eastern half of Texas is a humid, muggy, cloudy environment, with enough rain and water to support large numbers of people. This region of the country is flat, green, and doesn't much more sun than the Northeast or Midwest.

West Texas to southern California is arid, has mountains, and water resource issues. These places get a lot of sun because of the lack of moisture, totally different environment.

Also, cities in the southeast have older areas, and are considered to have a more culture and character (New Orleans, Houston, Atlanta) than those in the Southwest where everything seems brand spankin' new.

Yet, both of them are put into the category "sunbelt."

Is it is meaningless, and even incorrect term?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-22-2007, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,610 posts, read 23,194,316 times
Reputation: 5446
I totally agree! Florida is known as the "Sunshine State," but Colorado-- heck, even Wyoming is sunnier than Florida! The sunniest state in the nation (as a whole) has got to be a tie between AZ, NV, or NM. Both CO and WY, as well as northern Nevada, Utah, northern Arizona (around Flagstaff and the Grand Canyon), eastern Montana, anywhere on the high plains can all get really cold and really snowy, but sunny too. For example, here in Denver, it snowed yesterday afternoon and last night. Today it is about 20 degrees out, but the sun is out-- not one single cloud in the sky, and when you go outside it actually feels warm due to the sun's reflection on the snow! Combine that with the high elevation, and you can actually get sunburn out here-- even in the dead of winter!

The West/Southwest and the South are two totally different regions, and should NOT be grouped together as one region IMO.

A more accurate name for the "sunbelt" would be "The Hotter than Hell in the Summer and Relatively Less Cold in the Winter Belt." Only, that doesn't sound as attractive.

Last edited by vegaspilgrim; 12-22-2007 at 01:35 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-22-2007, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Cortland, Ohio
3,343 posts, read 10,869,019 times
Reputation: 1586
I consider most of the south the sunbelt.........AZ, New Mexico, etc. the southwest. That's just my opinion though.
Also, NE Ohio and Western Pa are probably the cloudiest areas in the US. Anywhere other than here would be considered the sunbelt to most people in my region!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2007, 11:33 AM
 
5,947 posts, read 13,001,950 times
Reputation: 4793
interesting opinions.

I tend to see an arid/semiarid west half of the country, and a more humid, greener more populated part of the country division. I live in the midwest, and know the winters quite well. Still, I think of the south as being more like the midwest than southwest by far.

Still warmth does not = sun.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2007, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,004 posts, read 77,004,399 times
Reputation: 10370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avatar View Post
What about North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, and Arkansas? Those areas are sunbelt and hardly flat. And they get a lot more sun than the midwest and northeast. (have you ever spent a winter in the midwest?...much gloomier than the south)
Wrong.

Lets look at some southern cities vs. northern cities and their sunshine percentages in winter (or summer too while youre at it). I have highlighted the yearly percentage as well as the winter month percentages. Youll notice that some northern cities not only have higher sunshine percentage than southern cities, but also our summer sunshine levels are higher in some cases too. Oh, and we get alot less rain and are alot less humid. Of course our winters are obviously colder in general, but people moving south and expecting to wear shorts year round are out of their minds (unless theyre moving to south Florida).

Chicago (http://www.weatherbase.com/weather/w...03527&refer=):
Average Possibility of Sunshine Years on Record: 13

YEAR Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec.
% 54 46 47 50 50 57 67 65 63 58 56 43 44


Atlanta(http://www.weatherbase.com/weather/w...91227&refer=):
Average Possibility of Sunshine Years on Record: 58

YEAR Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec.
% 61 49 54 58 66 68 67 63 64 63 67 58 50



Minneapolis(http://www.weatherbase.com/weather/w...85627&refer=):
Average Possibility of Sunshine Years on Record: 55

YEAR Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec.
% 58 53 59 57 58 61 65 72 69 62 55 39 42



Nashville (http://www.weatherbase.com/weather/w...72327&refer=):
Average Possibility of Sunshine Years on Record: 51

YEAR Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May Jun. Jul. Aug. Sep. Oct. Nov. Dec.
% 56 41 47 52 59 60 65 63 63 63 62 50 42
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2007, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,004 posts, read 77,004,399 times
Reputation: 10370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avatar View Post
You can quote whatever statistics you want. I've lived in the midwest and Georgia for over a decade each. In the midwest, you hardly see the sun from November to March.
Yep, whatever, let the FACTS be damned. Funny, we've just had a solid 5 days in a row that were cloudless and beautiful, and several partly sunny days. The longest cloudy streak we've had so far was 5 days (yes, I keep track).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2007, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Phoenix/Tempe, Arizona
128 posts, read 170,149 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avatar View Post
You can quote whatever statistics you want. I've lived in the midwest and Georgia for over a decade each. In the midwest, you hardly see the sun from November to March.
Avatar! Don't feed it! DON'T FEED IT!!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2007, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
20,004 posts, read 77,004,399 times
Reputation: 10370
Quote:
Originally Posted by desert student View Post
Avatar! Don't feed it! DON'T FEED IT!!!!
You too can join the "absurdly ignorant" crowd. I just love it when people are faced with FACTS and are still ignorant and/or blind. Unbelievable. Heaven help this world!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2007, 09:42 PM
 
539 posts, read 1,914,308 times
Reputation: 435
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
I totally agree! Florida is known as the "Sunshine State," but Colorado-- heck, even Wyoming is sunnier than Florida! The sunniest state in the nation (as a whole) has got to be a tie between AZ, NV, or NM. Both CO and WY, as well as northern Nevada, Utah, northern Arizona (around Flagstaff and the Grand Canyon), eastern Montana, anywhere on the high plains can all get really cold and really snowy, but sunny too. For example, here in Denver, it snowed yesterday afternoon and last night. Today it is about 20 degrees out, but the sun is out-- not one single cloud in the sky, and when you go outside it actually feels warm due to the sun's reflection on the snow! Combine that with the high elevation, and you can actually get sunburn out here-- even in the dead of winter!

The West/Southwest and the South are two totally different regions, and should NOT be grouped together as one region IMO.

A more accurate name for the "sunbelt" would be "The Hotter than Hell in the Summer and Relatively Less Cold in the Winter Belt." Only, that doesn't sound as attractive.



Right. Here in Chicago I've seen the sun shine when it was -10 outside. Sun alone does not equal warmth. Though I must admit Chicago is often gloomy during the winter.


_
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2007, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
7,731 posts, read 13,376,569 times
Reputation: 5982
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
Yes,

Do you think the "sunbelt" is kind of a meaningless term?

It encompasses everything in the southern states ranging from Florida to California, but the physical is completely different.

People equate warmer winters automatically with "sun"

Florida to the eastern half of Texas is a humid, muggy, cloudy environment, with enough rain and water to support large numbers of people. This region of the country is flat, green, and doesn't much more sun than the Northeast or Midwest.

West Texas to southern California is arid, has mountains, and water resource issues. These places get a lot of sun because of the lack of moisture, totally different environment.

Also, cities in the southeast have older areas, and are considered to have a more culture and character (New Orleans, Houston, Atlanta) than those in the Southwest where everything seems brand spankin' new.

Yet, both of them are put into the category "sunbelt."

Is it is meaningless, and even incorrect term?
No, I don't think so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top