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View Poll Results: What is the most boring drive in the US?
Interstate 5 between Santa Clarita and Stockton, CA 38 15.14%
Interstate 8 between Casa Grande, AZ and Alpine, CA 5 1.99%
Interstate 10 between El Paso and San Antonio, TX 49 19.52%
Interstate 29 between Sioux Falls, SD and Fargo, ND 8 3.19%
Interstate 40 between Flagstaff, AZ and Barstow, CA 8 3.19%
Interstate 57 between Interstate 55 and Urbana, IL 49 19.52%
Interstate 70 between Topeka, KS and Aurora, CO 61 24.30%
Interstate 80 between Sparks, NV and Salt Lake City, UT 11 4.38%
Interstate 90 between Rapid City and Sioux Falls, SD 8 3.19%
Interstate 94 between Billings, MT and Fargo, ND 14 5.58%
Voters: 251. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-01-2021, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
15,419 posts, read 9,069,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpdivola View Post
Unless you are driving through hills or mountains most interstates are pretty boring. Despite being a fairly scenic state, the New York Thurway (I-90) from Utica west is pretty boring.
At least you can see trees along the New York Thurway. In the Midwest you can drive miles and never see a tree, except for those lines of trees that some farmers plant along the edges of their property, to try and keep their crops from blowing away.
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Old 01-02-2021, 04:24 AM
 
Location: Seattle
60 posts, read 35,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
The entire population of the eastern 120 miles of Colorado is 140,000 as of 2016, and shrinking every year. Driving through Cheyenne County and Cheyenne Wells (the county seat of 800) was a sad affair. In 50 years you can make a case there will not be anyone left.
True. The water table is shrinking in the great plains area three forcing the population to move elsewhere. There is a proposal to turn that area (including parts of western Kansas) into a large national grassland restoring the vast grasslands that once existed there. If this occurs, I bet that tourism would increase and the area would be much more interesting.
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Old 01-02-2021, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
17,790 posts, read 13,682,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
In the Midwest you can drive miles and never see a tree, except for those lines of trees that some farmers plant along the edges of their property, to try and keep their crops from blowing away.
Again, I'm assuming you are referring to the Great Plains that you showed on your map in an earlier post.

It's interesting in that the treeless plains seems to be a function of elevation and rainfall. For instance on I 40 in Oklahoma there are trees and forests east of OKC (ok forests with short trees) and west of OKC it gets drier and higher. In about 90 miles you go from about 1200 feet to 2000 feet and in that stretch you see trees only along rivers and creek beds.

As you climb from 2000 feet to 3000 feet in western Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle you still see really short scroungy trees in the low 2000s. Then you go over an area of canyons in the mid 2000s and then BOOM. All of the sudden you are up on the caprock (3000 feet) and their aren't any trees.

In fact on other highways south of I-40 the caprock looks like a giant wall (and actually is) as you leave the ranching lands and enter the canyons coming from the east.
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Old 01-02-2021, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
15,419 posts, read 9,069,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Again, I'm assuming you are referring to the Great Plains that you showed on your map in an earlier post.

It's interesting in that the treeless plains seems to be a function of elevation and rainfall. For instance on I 40 in Oklahoma there are trees and forests east of OKC (ok forests with short trees) and west of OKC it gets drier and higher. In about 90 miles you go from about 1200 feet to 2000 feet and in that stretch you see trees only along rivers and creek beds.

As you climb from 2000 feet to 3000 feet in western Oklahoma and the Texas panhandle you still see really short scroungy trees in the low 2000s. Then you go over an area of canyons in the mid 2000s and then BOOM. All of the sudden you are up on the caprock (3000 feet) and their aren't any trees.

In fact on other highways south of I-40 the caprock looks like a giant wall (and actually is) as you leave the ranching lands and enter the canyons coming from the east.
Yes, that's it. Sorry I did it again. I should have said, that middle part of the country that has no trees and no mountains.
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Old 01-02-2021, 04:22 PM
 
515 posts, read 252,879 times
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I-16 from Macon to Savannah in Georgia could be here... Generally I usually only traverse interstates in the Southeast, but I'd guess visually unappealing states like Illinois (outside of Chicago), Iowa, etc. would be on here. I-10 from Tallahassee to Pensacola has been mentioned, and that's boring too.
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Old 01-02-2021, 04:55 PM
 
Location: East Bay, San Francisco Bay Area
23,527 posts, read 24,011,889 times
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I’d say I-5 between Santa Clarita and Stockton, CA.
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Old 01-02-2021, 09:56 PM
 
Location: WA Desert, Seattle native
9,398 posts, read 8,873,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccm123 View Post
I’d say I-5 between Santa Clarita and Stockton, CA.
In addition, most of this segment is just two lanes in each direction, unusual for Southern California. So not only is it boring, but frustrating as it has high truck traffic, many of which are on metered speeds so when they move into the left lane it slows everyone.
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Old 01-02-2021, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Oregon Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
In addition, most of this segment is just two lanes in each direction, unusual for Southern California. So not only is it boring, but frustrating as it has high truck traffic, many of which are on metered speeds so when they move into the left lane it slows everyone.
For the record, 80% of the Interstate system is four lanes, with high truck traffic. So what you are describing is nothing unique to I-5. I believe all the examples given are two lanes each direction. If you want to see high truck traffic, try driving I-80 across Wyoming. Bumper to bumper trucks in both lanes.
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Old 01-03-2021, 12:17 AM
 
Location: WA Desert, Seattle native
9,398 posts, read 8,873,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
For the record, 80% of the Interstate system is four lanes, with high truck traffic. So what you are describing is nothing unique to I-5. I believe all the examples given are two lanes each direction. If you want to see high truck traffic, try driving I-80 across Wyoming. Bumper to bumper trucks in both lanes.
Yes, agreed. My point was simply California is a big enough State to expand I-5. It certainly is not Wyoming.
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Old 01-03-2021, 12:33 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,930 posts, read 11,721,722 times
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A few years ago, I helped my son escape from Memphis and move to the East-side of the Bay Area in a rental moving truck. That was an incredibly boring trip. We passed through the outer edge of a weather system that produced a tornado near Little Rock and heavy rain on our route. That was the extent of our "excitement".
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