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Old 09-19-2015, 06:34 PM
 
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What about Natchez?

I mean, it's smaller, but it technically has the largest collection of antebellum structures still standing in the United States.

Seriously.

More Charleston and Savannah combined.
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Old 09-19-2015, 07:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emmerich01 View Post
What about Natchez?

I mean, it's smaller, but it technically has the largest collection of antebellum structures still standing in the United States.

Seriously.

More Charleston and Savannah combined.
I think it has the largest collection of antebellum homes (i.e., plantation mansions), not structures overall. They are located on large lots and on the outskirts from what I understand--very different from the urban rowhouses and single houses in the downtown historic districts of Savannah and Charleston, respectively.
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Old 09-20-2015, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Very different, Natchez and the surrounding area is quite nice.
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Old 09-21-2015, 08:01 AM
 
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I know its in DC but I feel like Georgetown has that same old historic feel to it.
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Old 09-21-2015, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Miami, Floroda
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Not really.
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Old 09-21-2015, 01:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
I would say no. New Orleans comes closest, but New Orleans is a big city and gritty as hell. New Orleans especially has some linkages with Savannah. Charleston, not so much.

There are some small cities, like Beaufort, that may have a hint of these cities, but no where else really compares.

Also, I know Charleston and Savannah are always grouped together, because they are old, historic and charming, but I feel they have very different vibes. Charleston feels much whiter, richer, more Republican, more preppy, more Old South, and was a bigger city in the past, has a bigger historic area, and is more of a foodie town. Savannah is somewhat messier, dirtier, more hipster, blacker, more edgy, less refined. They appeal to different people, IMO.

I find Charleston a bit stuffy and has too many rich old Republicans, but it's undeniable that it has a bigger historic core, more amenities and more culinary accolades.
I would agree with the bolded. I recently went on a trip to coastal GA and SC, and before the trip had assumed the two areas were very similar. But I actually found them to be quite different, surprisingly. Maybe surprisingly just because I've always heard them grouped together.

Your descriptions were close to what I observed in both (most striking differences to me were in how much bigger Charleston is, and the grittier feel of Savannah). Although you say it appeals to different types of people, I liked both (perhaps enjoyed Savannah a bit more, though, if I had to pick).
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Old 09-21-2015, 02:14 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
I would say no. New Orleans comes closest, but New Orleans is a big city and gritty as hell. New Orleans especially has some linkages with Savannah. Charleston, not so much.

There are some small cities, like Beaufort, that may have a hint of these cities, but no where else really compares.

Also, I know Charleston and Savannah are always grouped together, because they are old, historic and charming, but I feel they have very different vibes. Charleston feels much whiter, richer, more Republican, more preppy, more Old South, and was a bigger city in the past, has a bigger historic area, and is more of a foodie town. Savannah is somewhat messier, dirtier, more hipster, blacker, more edgy, less refined. They appeal to different people, IMO.

I find Charleston a bit stuffy and has too many rich old Republicans, but it's undeniable that it has a bigger historic core, more amenities and more culinary accolades.
By bigger do you mean from a population standpoint, or do you mean in regards to its rank among other cities? Because it's currently the largest it's ever been from a population standpoint.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Charleston has rich older folks, but what makes you think they are Republicans? Do old white Democrats look any different than old white Republicans? LOL

But I've always found the perspective of tourists to be interesting compared to folks who are from Charleston/SC and much more familiar with it. The characterization of it as a White town is always a bit funny to me.
I love the city, but I too also got the white Republican country club vibe from the city, but then again Charleston Democrats may just be different than what I'm used to.

As for its demographics, compared to other cities it is very white. The 2010 Census put the the city at 68.6% non-Hispanic white.
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Old 09-21-2015, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, CA
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Galveston, Texas?
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Old 09-21-2015, 05:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
I love the city, but I too also got the white Republican country club vibe from the city, but then again Charleston Democrats may just be different than what I'm used to.
So rich older White Democrats dress differently and aren't country club members? Lol...plus many, if not most, of those folks are tourists anyway.

Quote:
As for its demographics, compared to other cities it is very white. The 2010 Census put the the city at 68.6% non-Hispanic white.
The city proper is patchy and artificially small compared to the size of the overall metro, which is a result of SC's restrictive and archaic annexation laws. No doubt the historic district is rich and White, but that's quite unrepresentative of the larger area which has a significant African American presence. I guess because I'm familiar with the region being a native SC'er with roots in the Lowcountry, it's always a bit amusing when I read these sorts of characterizations.
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Old 09-21-2015, 06:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
So rich older White Democrats dress differently and aren't country club members? Lol...plus many, if not most, of those folks are tourists anyway.
The main difference between rich Democrats and rich Republicans is how they view those less fortunate.

Republicans do what's best for themselves and once they've made their money they tend to feel it's their duty to give back.

Democrats tend to do what's best (at least they think so, but it tends to backfire) for others up front, but don't apply these rules to themselves.

The issue is less a political one than a rich-poor divide.

People seem to dress for the weather or geographically from what I've seen.

N. Charleston seemed to have a fair number of black folks, but that said the historic and some of beach sections still felt very buttoned up to me. Whether that was the money aspect, the military clean cut look, or a combination of the the two it's hard to say.

Not to mention there was a lot of higher end shopping you're not expecting to see in a city of that size.
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