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View Poll Results: What big Midwestern city needs more density and walkability the most
Detroit 6 20.69%
Minneapolis 0 0%
St Louis 1 3.45%
Cincinnati 0 0%
Kansas City 5 17.24%
Columbus 6 20.69%
Cleveland 0 0%
Indianapolis 11 37.93%
Milwaukee 0 0%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-11-2019, 05:13 PM
Status: "Coffee is at least 3 of my food groups" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Chi > DC > Reno > SEA
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Detroit and Cincinnati are the only ones that have no current or proposed BRT lines, let alone light rail. Cincinnati's topography would make it challenging, and Detroit covers (I think) a larger area so it has even less of an excuse.
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Old 10-11-2019, 08:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
I mean, Detroit was dense. The new infill is contained to 5 or 6 blocks in any direction downtown, and then drops off to zilch.. So, at peak density, it may be better off than Coloumbus or Indianapolis? Probably not even though?

I think the core in Indianapolis is more walkable than Columbus? Maybe?

I ammm Ron Burgundy?
To put in perspective the extent of Detroit's collapse, its peak population density was on par with Philadelphia's.
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Old 10-12-2019, 04:39 AM
 
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I think a very strong case can be made for Indy, Columbus, Detroit and KC.

Columbus' downtown is about 75% surface parking
https://www.google.com/maps/place/61...!4d-82.9881855

Indianapolis has an unfortunate lack of dense, walkable neighborhoods for an older midwestern city of its size
https://statisticalatlas.com/place/I...ce)/Population

https://www.walkscore.com/IN/Indianapolis

Kansas City has too many highways (number 1 highway miles per capita of any US metro) and generally feels far too spaced out.

Detroit, as we all know, is scarred by blight and abandonment, so there is very little that is still dense and walkable left.
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Old 10-12-2019, 08:19 AM
 
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I did a little research , and here are the psm population density numbers for the cities listed:

Minneapolis - 7,694
Milwaukee - 6,197
St. Louis - 4,984
Cleveland - 4,969
Detroit - 4,851
Columbus - 4,181
Cincinnati - 3,864
Indianapolis - 2,387
Kansas City - 1,559
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Old 10-12-2019, 08:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taggerung View Post
I think a very strong case can be made for Indy, Columbus, Detroit and KC.

Columbus' downtown is about 75% surface parking
https://www.google.com/maps/place/61...!4d-82.9881855

Indianapolis has an unfortunate lack of dense, walkable neighborhoods for an older midwestern city of its size
https://statisticalatlas.com/place/I...ce)/Population

https://www.walkscore.com/IN/Indianapolis

Kansas City has too many highways (number 1 highway miles per capita of any US metro) and generally feels far too spaced out.

Detroit, as we all know, is scarred by blight and abandonment, so there is very little that is still dense and walkable left.
The Vernor Hwy corridor in SW Detroit and a tiny enclave adjacent to Hamtramck on the NE side of the city are the only vestiges of high density/walkability that remain.

It's kind of surreal though, because even with the large swaths of blight and abandonment, it still feels more "urban" than majority of the Sunbelt boomtowns. That's partially because the extensive infrastructure that accommodated its peak population remains in place and you still have a ton of abandoned / burnt out structures artificially filling the aesthetic of the neighborhoods
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Old 10-12-2019, 01:02 PM
 
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The thing we have to keep in mind is that Detroit was designed, in part, to be a car town, so it shouldn't be that surprising that people have been encouraged to drive, not walk. (Hello - we are Motor City!) And a lot of the walkable areas don't exist anymore because when highways were built and expanded in the 1960's, they destroyed neighborhoods. It's not like this stuff just happened.

It's really hit or miss if an area is walkable or not.

But why is it desirable for every space of a city to be built up and used? There's something to be said about building urban farms and green spaces for people to enjoy nature.
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Old 10-12-2019, 01:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
The thing we have to keep in mind is that Detroit was designed, in part, to be a car town, so it shouldn't be that surprising that people have been encouraged to drive, not walk. (Hello - we are Motor City!) And a lot of the walkable areas don't exist anymore because when highways were built and expanded in the 1960's, they destroyed neighborhoods. It's not like this stuff just happened.

It's really hit or miss if an area is walkable or not.

But why is it desirable for every space of a city to be built up and used? There's something to be said about building urban farms and green spaces for people to enjoy nature.
I don't agree with the idea of "urban farms." Urban community gardens or individual gardens are just fine, but large scale farming should be down outside of the city, in the rural areas.
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