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Old 10-12-2019, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Preussen
450 posts, read 130,831 times
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There is quite often misconception that Europe is cold continent but it is actually warm continent and there is barely snow here in winters except for very northern part of it. As I have never been to United States I am curious if it is the same there with exception of Alaska of course. So in northern states or places like Boston, New York, Chicago is snow present for longer periods of time like most of the winter or is it rare and just reoccuring for short periods of time?
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Old 10-12-2019, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
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While growing up in Upstate NY, I *remember* that snow was on the ground for what felt like almost the entirety of late December through early March. Now a days, it is patchier, maybe snow on the ground half of the time, depending on levels of shade, etc.

NYC, no, it will snow, sit around for maybe a few days, then melt. Chicago and Boston have a better chance of keeping the snow. I think your best bet for snow that comes and stays will be places like the UP of Michigan, Adirondacks, and Northern New England (VT, NH, ME). The mountains in the West also typically keep snow throughout winter, but the lower elevation areas out there are a different story.
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Old 10-12-2019, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Rochester NY
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Most of the lake effect regions of upstate Ny (Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse) have snow on the ground most of the winter. Unless there is a freak 40-50 degree day that melts it is there most of the winter, at least Jan-March. However snow is not uncommon oct-dec and even April and early May snow is possible.
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Old 10-12-2019, 01:02 PM
 
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Almost anywhere that's above Interstate 90.
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Old 10-12-2019, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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The northernmost tier of states east of the Rockies generally have snow on the ground for most of the winter:

Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Upstate New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine. Those are the only states where you can count on reliable snow cover.

And then of course, almost all of Alaska.
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Old 10-12-2019, 05:04 PM
 
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I would say the US is somewhat comparable to Europe in this regard. There are places that get a lot of snow, places that never get snow, and places where it snows, but the snow isn't deep and doesn't last long. It varies so much by the precise location.

For instance, people think of the Northeast as the snowiest part of the US, but California gets a great deal of snow, in some places over 10 meters per year. However, snow is concentrated in the mountains and not in the areas where most people live. The major cities in California (Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, etc.) get virtually no snow at all. So is California a snowy place? Yes and no.

Another example: Western Washington state (e.g Seattle) gets very little snow, some years none at all, while Eastern Washington state (e.g., Spokane) may have 2-3 cm on the ground for much of the winter and sometimes more.
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Old 10-12-2019, 05:12 PM
 
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Upstate NY and upper midwest
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Old 10-12-2019, 05:15 PM
 
1,445 posts, read 803,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I would say the US is somewhat comparable to Europe in this regard. There are places that get a lot of snow, places that never get snow, and places where it snows, but the snow isn't deep and doesn't last long. It varies so much by the precise location.

For instance, people think of the Northeast as the snowiest part of the US, but California gets a great deal of snow, in some places over 10 meters per year. However, snow is concentrated in the mountains and not in the areas where most people live. The major cities in California (Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, etc.) get virtually no snow at all. So is California a snowy place? Yes and no.

Another example: Western Washington state (e.g Seattle) gets very little snow, some years none at all, while Eastern Washington state (e.g., Spokane) may have 2-3 cm on the ground for much of the winter and sometimes more.
The Cascades in Washington is also one of the snowiest places in the US.
Quote:
The Paradise area at Mount Rainier (elevation of 5,400 feet) is known for its snowfall. Paradise once held the world record for measured snowfall in single year in 1971-1972: 1,122 inches (93.5 feet/28.5 meters).
https://www.nps.gov/mora/planyourvis...all-totals.htm
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Old 10-12-2019, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Tarheel State Till January
960 posts, read 274,817 times
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The South rarely gets snow. When I was a kid, 8 inches of snow was considered a blizzard here. It snows even more rarely these years. It was slightly more common in the 70s & 80s. I hate snow TBH, and ice storms are even worse. Winter, which used to be one of my favorite seasons due to the holidays, is now my second most despised - after summer. Too bad I can't afford to live in San Diego.
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Old 10-12-2019, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Miami, The Magic City
3,299 posts, read 2,263,073 times
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Buffalo.

Actually, many times in Chicago it is too cold for snow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muinteoir View Post
While growing up in Upstate NY, I *remember* that snow was on the ground for what felt like almost the entirety of late December through early March. Now a days, it is patchier, maybe snow on the ground half of the time, depending on levels of shade, etc.

NYC, no, it will snow, sit around for maybe a few days, then melt. Chicago and Boston have a better chance of keeping the snow. I think your best bet for snow that comes and stays will be places like the UP of Michigan, Adirondacks, and Northern New England (VT, NH, ME). The mountains in the West also typically keep snow throughout winter, but the lower elevation areas out there are a different story.
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