U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-11-2019, 05:50 PM
 
Location: The City of Trees
1,159 posts, read 2,668,518 times
Reputation: 1714

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonSJ View Post
To be fair most big cities are liberal (even Salt Lake City had an openly lesbian mayor few years ago). Boise as well. But if you include suburbs then it's different story. So don't confuse city with its county.
Colorado Springs is conservative but probably not that much in near future, same as Fort Worth. The big city that is definitely conservative for a very very long time is OKC.
Correct, if the OP is looking for a conservative city then Boise isn't a good fit as the city is liberal and run by Democrats.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-12-2019, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
3,274 posts, read 2,321,596 times
Reputation: 3876
Quote:
Originally Posted by survivingearth View Post
Colorado Springs, when i visited was way more conservative than Denver and had from what i heard a christian/conservative dating scene.
True. Colo Spgs does have a more conservative veneer than Denver and does lean right politically. For the dating aspect, that is also probably true, as it would be for any city of significant size. For dating there is also the ChristianMingle.com dating site that is national. Its just that Denver has so much moderate to liberal influences, that its conservative base is often overlooked by most. Also, much of the suburbs and exburbs are fairly conservative, as they are with most major cities.

Lets look at these measures; Colo Spgs has 4 faith based high schools. Denver has dozens. Does that make Denver more conservative? Church attendance in Colo Spgs is below national averages, does that make it more liberal? The large evangelical organizations in Colo Spgs relocated here as a business decision and they are not home grown like some other places. Does that make us more or less conservative than a place where these organizations are founded, grow, and thrive? Tolerance does swing both ways and being tolerant of a large faith based business does not make one conservative anymore than tolerating a large alternative lifestyle group that may be present in a city makes one liberal.

There are a lot of ways to slice this and for the OP, a host of other wants and needs aside from political and fiscal conservatism. Research well so decision can be made in an informed manner.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
9,178 posts, read 8,118,641 times
Reputation: 8154
honestly any major city not on the east or west coast is fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Seattle
5,442 posts, read 3,315,618 times
Reputation: 3844
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
honestly any major city not on the east or west coast is fine.
Yep. And even those are fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Houston for Living/Los Angeles for Work
1,534 posts, read 552,935 times
Reputation: 2075
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
honestly any major city not on the east or west coast is fine.
I know quite a few conservatives in both places that are just fine and love where they live.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
9,178 posts, read 8,118,641 times
Reputation: 8154
Quote:
Originally Posted by As Above So Below... View Post
I know quite a few conservatives in both places that are just fine and love where they live.
Really not a fan of the coasts, I wouldn't in good faith recommend them to a conservative by any means. Your mileage may vary I guess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 09:35 PM
 
2,693 posts, read 824,294 times
Reputation: 1922
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonSJ View Post
To be fair most big cities are liberal (even Salt Lake City had an openly lesbian mayor few years ago). Boise as well. But if you include suburbs then it's different story. So don't confuse city with its county.
Colorado Springs is conservative but probably not that much in near future, same as Fort Worth. The big city that is definitely conservative for a very very long time is OKC.
I'm pretty sure Fort Worth and Oklahoma are also blue majoritt cities
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 09:55 PM
 
15 posts, read 1,665 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foamposite View Post
I'm pretty sure Fort Worth and Oklahoma are also blue majoritt cities
No they are not. They still have R mayor and represented by R at federal and state level. Fort Worth however is getting less conservative with massive population growth, and should be considered moderate conservative. Meanwhile OKC has little showing of getting less conservative. (I know last midterm Dem won a seat there 1.4 point but still). My theory is that a significant number of people left TX head to OK every year, lots of them are probably seniors (tend to be conservative) who have no little benefit of zero state income tax, while suffering TXs enormous property tax (4th highest of the country)
Btw, OKC is still a very good place, it's economy is doing well with the robust energy sector, tech is doing well too. I looked and saw Forbes frequently listed it top 10 best cities for business. OKC should be highly considered.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2019, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,401 posts, read 4,425,240 times
Reputation: 3880
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftVision View Post
I'm a conservative in his late twenties, working in IT looking for a new part of the country to move and work in. I've previously lived in Bozeman, MT, Columbus, Ohio and most recently Minneapolis, MN.

Minneapolis is not bad, but I'm thinking of trying something new over the next year or so. Living in MT made me fall in love with the mountains, so having mountains around or nearby would be great.

Some places I'm thinking of based on the names I've seen pop up here and in YouTube videos in no particular order:

Raleigh, NC
Chattanooga, TN
Fort Worth, TX

I've been to the south before (LA and KY). I love the food and energy down there. The people seem really warm and friendly too and I miss that.

I'm also really curious about living in New Hampshire. I don't mind living in cold weather at all, as long as there's someplace I can go ski. I'd like to have a family one day and it seems like a great state for that. I also kind of like that it doesn't seem to show up on a lot of polls or lists that I've come across, so it could be a hidden gem.

I'm also open to any new suggestions.
The three cities are all great choices. Raleigh leans democrat, but not the same as some of the polarized coastal cities. I would agree with Greenville as a suggestion. It is a really nice city and metro area with friendly people and low crime. Ft. Worth has a strong local culture and laid back feel. Chattanooga has a nice downtown, but lacks growth and new tech jobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-13-2019, 12:41 AM
 
2,693 posts, read 824,294 times
Reputation: 1922
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonSJ View Post
No they are not. They still have R mayor and represented by R at federal and state level. Fort Worth however is getting less conservative with massive population growth, and should be considered moderate conservative. Meanwhile OKC has little showing of getting less conservative. (I know last midterm Dem won a seat there 1.4 point but still). My theory is that a significant number of people left TX head to OK every year, lots of them are probably seniors (tend to be conservative) who have no little benefit of zero state income tax, while suffering TXs enormous property tax (4th highest of the country)
Btw, OKC is still a very good place, it's economy is doing well with the robust energy sector, tech is doing well too. I looked and saw Forbes frequently listed it top 10 best cities for business. OKC should be highly considered.
Calling Fort Worth (the city) conservative is a stretch. If it has more blue voters than red voters
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top