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Old 12-12-2019, 07:24 AM
 
1,298 posts, read 1,903,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NC2ATL60 View Post
Hmmm I disagree on that point. Nashville may have a more tourist centric downtown for sure, but to call it better than Charlotte's is a bit of a stretch. Especially considering Charlotte is under going a downtown boom as well and already has mass transit though it's core.

New high rises don't make a downtown better. There are many other factors that should be weighed.
Charlotte is a nice town, but I don't feel the energy that I feel when I go to Nashville's downtown.
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Old 12-13-2019, 11:55 PM
 
Location: WA Desert, Seattle native
6,410 posts, read 4,243,199 times
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Nashville has energy because of the country music "capital" perception. I know that isn't all of it, but it still remains impactful. Their MSA growth is impressive. The State growth is also good, but not overwhelming. In other words, Nashville beats the rest of the State with growth overall.
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Old 12-14-2019, 10:30 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,827 posts, read 19,239,431 times
Reputation: 11222
Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
Nashville has energy because of the country music "capital" perception. I know that isn't all of it, but it still remains impactful. Their MSA growth is impressive. The State growth is also good, but not overwhelming. In other words, Nashville beats the rest of the State with growth overall.
Nashville benefits statistically from both having a huge city land area and a huge MSA land area. It also benefits from having a huge "brand" with its entertainment/cultural credentials, and its energy being concentrated in its core. These things make it seem more impressive than it is, and allows it to toy with the idea that it's on the same level with places like Atlanta (which is laughable), or Charlotte (which is larger by nearly 600,000).
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Old 12-14-2019, 10:32 AM
 
8,150 posts, read 5,222,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jas75 View Post
The Amish population is spread out across numerous states, so they are not likely to have much impact on statewide growth numbers. The Lancaster, PA area is well known for Amish communities, but with its proximity to the big cities, land is getting expensive and some of the Amish are resettling elsewhere, often in the Midwest. Indiana is estimated as having the highest proportion of Amish residents among states at about 0.9%, with Ohio second and Pennsylvania third.
The largest Amish community in the world reportedly is in northeast Ohio. It spreads across several counties, but is centered in western Holmes County.

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Travel-g...h.Country.html
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Old 12-14-2019, 11:20 AM
 
8,150 posts, read 5,222,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bert_from_back_East View Post
After an extended visit to the Upper Midwest this summer, I theorize that states in this region such as Michigan and Wisconsin, for example, will make a resurgence in the mid-21st century and, as a result, experience population growth for several major reasons:
  • Climate Change: Over time, seasonal warming will make the cold season in the Upper Midwest milder and shorter (i.e., more tolerable for most Americans). Additionally, climate change will make the massive freshwater supply of the Great Lakes Basin much more attractive from a national standpoint, as states in the Sun Belt with high population growth continue to experience severe drought conditions and major water shortages and crises. Finally, enormous, highly destructive hurricanes, tornadoes and wildfires throughout the Sun Belt will make the Great Lakes Basin more attractive, which is relatively insulated from major natural disasters.

  • Demographic Change: Eventually, the Sun Belt will have such a high minority population that non-Hispanic whites will not feel comfortable and welcome in this region of America. Massive, statewide "white flight" in California over the past 30 years offers us a glimpse into the future of non-Hispanic whites in the greater Sun Belt region. Since California became a majority-minority state in 1990's, non-Hispanic whites have essentially been "voting with their feet" and migrating to other states where non-Hispanic whites are still dominant such as Idaho, Oregon and Utah, for example. However, as of 2019, a number of other Sun Belt states are also majority-minority (e.g., Nevada, New Mexico and Texas) and many others are strongly trending in that direction (e.g., Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, etc.). The Upper Midwest is still mostly non-Hispanic white and, as a result, the public school systems in suburban and exurban areas have much better child and student outcomes compared to equivalent areas in most Sun Belt states, especially Arizona, California and Nevada.

  • Political Change: Of course, political change goes hand-in-hand with demographic change, at least in the United States. As states that were once Republican strongholds such as Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Nevada and Texas become increasingly liberal due to out-migration of whites from California, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York, the states of the Industrial Midwest and Northeast will trend more conservative, especially as first- and second-generation German-, Italian-, Polish- and Scandinavian-Americans in these states becomes fully ancestral and, subsequently, the population trends towards 100% American-born-and-bred (i.e., four grandparents born in America). We can already observe this trend in states such as Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin based on the results of 2016 presidential election. Even 14-15 towns in my home state of Rhode Island voted to elect Donald Trump in the last presidential election (the highest number in decades).

  • Right-to-Work: The disassembly and dissolution of right-to-work laws in the Upper Midwest will provide a competitive economic advantage to existing and future corporations because the workforce in this region is already well-educated and highly skilled to begin with, unlike the workforce of Arizona or South Carolina, for example.

  • Affordable Housing: The incredibly low cost of housing from a national perspective will be increasingly attractive feature of the Upper Midwest for families that are priced out of states like California, Colorado and Florida. In most of the Upper Midwest, residential homes in suburban and exurban areas feature basements, garages, long driveways and large front and backyards. Also, neighborhoods stay neat and tidy with HOA fees and assessments. Have you ever visited a neighborhood in Florida without an HOA? LOL.
Yours is the only post that begins to deal with the most significant reality that will dominate the U.S. and especially residential preferences in 2040. There's a strong possibility that non-coastal and more northern states will dominate population growth statistics. We're actually increasing fossil fuel production and consumption when we should be slashing it. We're unleashing natural processes, such as massive methane releases from thawing permafrost in the Arctic region and a reduced global albedo, that perhaps dooms any efforts to halt global warming.

See posts 115 to 119 in this thread.

https://www.city-data.com/forum/city...banity-13.html

Floridians and investors only now are beginning to come to grasp with the realities of man-made climate change.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...-florida-deals

https://www.npr.org/2019/11/28/78334...early-3-months

https://www.flkeysnews.com/article237759279.html

With annual mean global sea level rise now approaching 1/3 inch annually and accelerating, according to NASA statistics, over the next decade Floridians and residents of other coastal areas will witness disappearing beaches, inundated coastal nature preserves, and significant erosion and infrastructure costs.

https://www.theinvadingsea.com/2019/...is-threatened/

https://www.theinvadingsea.com/2019/...rs-to-replace/

Meanwhile prospective destination cities of the coming Great Climate Change Migration are just beginning efforts to promote themselves. See post 3698, and perhaps post 3692, in this thread.

https://www.city-data.com/forum/clev...sions-370.html

This article is featured in the above recommended post. It may be the first major news media article discussing the beginning of what Bloomberg calls the "Great Climate Exodus."

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/featu...e-florida-keys
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Old 12-14-2019, 03:20 PM
 
8,150 posts, read 5,222,330 times
Reputation: 4346
Default Correction to post 95

Quote:
Originally Posted by WRnative View Post
Yours is the only post that begins to deal with the most significant reality that will dominate the U.S. and especially residential preferences in 2040. There's a strong possibility that non-coastal and more northern states will dominate population growth statistics. We're actually increasing fossil fuel production and consumption when we should be slashing it. We're unleashing natural processes, such as massive methane releases from thawing permafrost in the Arctic region and a reduced global albedo, that perhaps dooms any efforts to halt global warming.

See posts 115 to 119 in this thread.

https://www.city-data.com/forum/city...banity-13.html
The second paragraph of the post above should read: "See posts 115 to 129 in this thread."
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