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Old 12-27-2019, 12:51 PM
 
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It seems like it has one of the higher concentrations of people with Southern accents, plus it personally meshes well with my personal idea of what the South is.

Even in the panhandle area, it seems like Southern accents are pretty common.

Yet many on here will state that it's either not that Southern, or just not Southern period.
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Old 12-27-2019, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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There are some elements of Southern culture, but Oklahoma is at the intersection of several different regions in the way most of the true South is not.
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Old 12-27-2019, 01:33 PM
 
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I once lived in Tulsa. It was years ago, so perhaps things have changed since then. But at that time, the majority of my social circle were transplants who thought they were living in the South, and the native Oklahomans that I knew thought they were Southerners living in the South. I had also met a few Oklahomans even before I moved there, and they likewise considered themselves Southerners.

Similarly, City-Data is the first (maybe only) place where I've encountered people who don't consider Texas part of the South.
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Old 12-27-2019, 01:54 PM
 
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From my experience, it's overstated here. There are several posters here who act like Oklahoma is as Southern as Georgia or Alabama.

My cousin lived in Tulsa for a long time, and I visited several times a year. I was living in Des Moines at the time, and I found the cities remarkably similar. Tulsa didn't feel like the South to me at all. It was Plains Midwest, with the oil money influence being the big difference between it and say Des Moines. Both felt like KC Jr. in a sense to me.

I've traveled through on I-35 many times as well. Northern Oklahoma feels 100% Plains Midwest, with it's towering grain elevators, endless fields, and flatness. You don't see that in the South really at all. There's an accent, but it's more of a twang than the traditional southern accent. I hear this similar accent in parts of Missouri, Kansas, and even southern Iowa/Nebraska.

Now, that being said, I've also traveled between I-44 and Dallas many times. That area feels strongly Southern. There's less agriculture, more mining, the accents are thicker and lose that western twang, and any resemblance to the Midwest is mostly gone.

I've also been through the state east to west. Once you get to the western edge of the state you start mixing in some classic Southwestern topography, and things turn more towards ranching than row crop agriculture. At this point, you're looking at the Cowboy culture and the Southwest/Western feel. Also, not Southern.

At the end of the day, Oklahoma is a state at cultural crossroads, and what culture you see in it is probably a reflection of where in the state you area. SE Oklahoma is the South, straight up. North/central Oklahoma is Midwestern. Western Oklahoma is the west/Southwest. To act is if it definitely belongs to any of these categories would be silly, and to ignore the presence of these would be equally silly. It's one of the more fascinating states, culturally, to me because of this. Only West Virginia is harder to place into one region or another.
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Old 12-27-2019, 02:17 PM
 
82 posts, read 18,297 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IowanFarmer View Post
From my experience, it's overstated here. There are several posters here who act like Oklahoma is as Southern as Georgia or Alabama.

My cousin lived in Tulsa for a long time, and I visited several times a year. I was living in Des Moines at the time, and I found the cities remarkably similar. Tulsa didn't feel like the South to me at all. It was Plains Midwest, with the oil money influence being the big difference between it and say Des Moines. Both felt like KC Jr. in a sense to me.

I've traveled through on I-35 many times as well. Northern Oklahoma feels 100% Plains Midwest, with it's towering grain elevators, endless fields, and flatness. You don't see that in the South really at all. There's an accent, but it's more of a twang than the traditional southern accent. I hear this similar accent in parts of Missouri, Kansas, and even southern Iowa/Nebraska.

Now, that being said, I've also traveled between I-44 and Dallas many times. That area feels strongly Southern. There's less agriculture, more mining, the accents are thicker and lose that western twang, and any resemblance to the Midwest is mostly gone.

I've also been through the state east to west. Once you get to the western edge of the state you start mixing in some classic Southwestern topography, and things turn more towards ranching than row crop agriculture. At this point, you're looking at the Cowboy culture and the Southwest/Western feel. Also, not Southern.

At the end of the day, Oklahoma is a state at cultural crossroads, and what culture you see in it is probably a reflection of where in the state you area. SE Oklahoma is the South, straight up. North/central Oklahoma is Midwestern. Western Oklahoma is the west/Southwest. To act is if it definitely belongs to any of these categories would be silly, and to ignore the presence of these would be equally silly. It's one of the more fascinating states, culturally, to me because of this. Only West Virginia is harder to place into one region or another.

Good post. I have never lived in Oklahoma but this is inline with what I thought.

One hang up I see on here is people looking at things like the rancher/cowboy culture, oil culture, etc and calling those things "southern". To me those elements are distinctly western and NOT southern.
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Old 12-27-2019, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
7,723 posts, read 6,653,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IowanFarmer View Post

At the end of the day, Oklahoma is a state at cultural crossroads, and what culture you see in it is probably a reflection of where in the state you area. SE Oklahoma is the South, straight up. North/central Oklahoma is Midwestern. Western Oklahoma is the west/Southwest. To act is if it definitely belongs to any of these categories would be silly, and to ignore the presence of these would be equally silly. It's one of the more fascinating states, culturally, to me because of this. Only West Virginia is harder to place into one region or another.
As a resident, I think this is pretty much true. Particularly from an historic standpoint. Even in Oklahoma City which was at the central point of the first Oklahoma land run. Oklahoma City south of the river was settled by southerners and north of the river mostly by people from points north.

Over the decades there has been more encroachment of southern types into other parts of Oklahoma because of oilfield job availability.

This is a map of the 1964 US presidential election and pretty much demonstrates the way the state is defined culturally to a great degree even now. Red/pink would be midwestern plains, light blue mixed/slightly southern and darker blue and darkest blue is more southern. Keep in mind only the southeast corner of Oklahoma is what I would call the "deep south". The rest is more like western Arkansas/Southern Missouri and north Texas.


Last edited by eddie gein; 12-27-2019 at 02:35 PM..
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Old 12-27-2019, 02:38 PM
 
372 posts, read 572,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IowanFarmer View Post
From my experience, it's overstated here. There are several posters here who act like Oklahoma is as Southern as Georgia or Alabama.



I've traveled through on I-35 many times as well. Northern Oklahoma feels 100% Plains Midwest, with it's towering grain elevators, endless fields, and flatness. You don't see that in the South really at all. There's an accent, but it's more of a twang than the traditional southern accent.

You see that lots of places in the South.
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Old 12-27-2019, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Originally Posted by kdb05f View Post
You see that lots of places in the South.
Not like these..........

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Old 12-27-2019, 03:48 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
5,443 posts, read 7,896,207 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdb05f View Post
I once lived in Tulsa. It was years ago, so perhaps things have changed since then. But at that time, the majority of my social circle were transplants who thought they were living in the South, and the native Oklahomans that I knew thought they were Southerners living in the South. I had also met a few Oklahomans even before I moved there, and they likewise considered themselves Southerners.

Similarly, City-Data is the first (maybe only) place where I've encountered people who don't consider Texas part of the South.



110% right on all accounts.

It is true though, that Oklahoma is decidedly more Western than most Southern states, texas being the only one in the same category.

Oklahoma is a great fusion of South and Western. It's exactly what it is geographically---South by West. The only thing that is overplayed on here (not very often honestly) is that people, for some reason, "want" Oklahoma to culturally be part of the Midwest when it reality it never has been historically (in the sense of the consciousness of the people) nor will it be.

Sorry Midwest apologists.

Signed,

Oklahomans

Last edited by Bass&Catfish2008; 12-27-2019 at 04:00 PM..
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Old 12-27-2019, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Houston for Living/Los Angeles for Work
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I think people spend too much time debating subjective labels. Oklahoma is just Oklahoma. Some places fit right in with what I see as Southern and others dont.
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