U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-28-2021, 10:48 AM
 
1,501 posts, read 824,699 times
Reputation: 1717

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by 908Boi View Post
the reason black people say that the Bay Area lacks black people is because in comparison to where most black people live (South and Northeast) it is noticeably less black . The Bay Area and Sacramento MSAs are both less than 10% which is less than the nationwide percentage (roughly 13-14%). It's a matter of perspective.
Exactly. And you don't expect an area that large to be below the national average.

That info is the Bay plus Sacramento. That's like what 10 million plus people? Other large CSAs such as NY, Chicago, Houston, DFW, Atlanta, Miami, Philadelphia are easily higher.

SF usually get a pass because it has a high population of Asians and Hispanics but from a black point of view, you look at the Bay Area and think where's the beef?

Boston gets the bad rap but the Bay is in the same boat.

Ik I will rustle a few feathers because the citydata darlings SF, Austin, Nashville, MSP are always listed as the best places in the universe to move too but the memo to black people seem to never arrive.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-28-2021, 11:09 AM
 
Location: plano
7,590 posts, read 9,515,098 times
Reputation: 7284
Houston has a large middle eastern population, second to Detroit by some measure if I recall correctly. It also has a large Asian population, specifically Chinese and Viennese and lots of Hispanics from all over Latin America. It is a more diverse city than most guess or give it credit for being.

Ive lived in Pittsburgh, north hills, Metro NYC in Somerset county NJ and Houston as well as now Dallas. I used express buses to commute to my job in DT Houston from 17 miles west of DT. I liked it but wonder why rail is played up so much more than a business system? Also living in Pittsburgh and NYC metro my commute was terrible as my job was no where near a rail node. Same in Pittsburgh so not a rail commute experience in my past. I loved trains as a kid but grew out of that lol
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2021, 11:32 AM
 
1,795 posts, read 1,398,736 times
Reputation: 1902
Not sure why you are trying to conflate Black and multiracial. There is a lot of black out-migration out of large northern cities but there was a much larger black population there to begin with. A 43k increase isn't nothing but I wouldn't call it impressive. You really cannot compare West Coast cities to East/Southern cities because the demographics/history are just different.

See here for comparison to other metros //www.city-data.com/forum/city-...l#post59428797 (shout out to @As Above So Below...).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2021, 11:36 AM
 
1,378 posts, read 1,822,690 times
Reputation: 1291
Anyone know when will the Census release individual cities and counties data?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2021, 11:57 AM
 
507 posts, read 328,899 times
Reputation: 838
I agree with the people saying Allegheny/Pittsburgh look like they may be undercounted. I was interested to see where the undercount (110,000) in Ohio may be so ran some numbers for counties in the three Cs, then included Allegheny to it, looking at GDP and job numbers (2016-2020) and compared it to population estimates over that same period.

Here are some of the metrics I looked at:

Population estimated change (16-20):
1. Franklin (Columbus): +42,306
2. Hamilton (Cincinnati): +6,141
3. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): -10,381
Wayne (Detroit): -11,269
4. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): -19,072

So estimates still have Allegheny and Cuyahoga continuing population losses. Hamilton is now slightly on the upswing (which I believe indeed is the case). Estimates still have Franklin humming along at +10,000 per year.

Total GDP growth (16-20)
1. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 8.40 percent
2. Hamilton (Cincinnati): 6.01 percent
3. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 5.90 percent
Wayne (Detroit): 3.93 percent
4. Franklin (Columbus): 3.86 percent

Allegheny is leading the way here despite losing over 10,000 people over the same period. Hamilton and Cuyahoga are about even in total growth and ahead of Franklin, which economically is growing slower recently despite the population gains.

Total GDP growth per capita (16-20):
1. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 9.32 percent
2. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 7.54 percent
3. Hamilton (Cincinnati): 5.21 percent
Wayne (Detroit): 4.60 percent
4. Franklin (Columbus): .52 percent

Allegheny and Cuyahoga lead here because they are increasing productivity despite estimated population losses. Columbus has barely broke even here.

How does GDP compare to overall job gains? This one only goes from 2016-19 because county job numbers for 2020 aren't listed (only partial and preliminary, plus hard to use those as every metro was obliterated by the pandemic). Anyway ...

Total job gains (16-19):
1. Franklin (Columbus): 26,870 (3.64 percent)
Wayne (Detroit): 22,570 (3.17 percent)
2. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 14,509 (2.11 percent)
3. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 13,070 (1.82 percent)
4. Hamilton (Cincinnati): 11,732 (2.30 percent)

Franklin, leading up to the pandemic, was still seeing job gains, so it shouldn't be losing population, but for whatever reasons those jobs haven't really led to much increase in GDP. The other three have also seen positive job gains, which should correlate to population growth, you would think.

Finally, here is how many jobs/per person each have gained based off total job growth vs. population change:
Wayne (Detroit): 3.81
1. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 3.54
2. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 2.96
3. Hamilton (Cincinnati): 1.54
4. Franklin (Columbus): .32

Overall, my takeaway from all this is:

1. Allegheney/Cuyahoga seem to be undercounted and the estimates that continued to show losses throughout the decade didn't catch up with economic upturn in both places.

2. Hamilton, while showing growth, still seems like it could be undercounted because that growth has been estimated lower than what economic factors show.

3. Franklin, while still on the positive side of population change, doesn't appear to be matching what it has been for much of the last 20-30 years. Part of that, I would believe, may be because the three other counties mentioned, are all seemingly back on the positive side of growth. I could see estimates there being readjusted from 10,000 gain per year down to 5,000 or so over that period, and Franklin coming in lower than what has been estimated.

I guess we'll find out soon enough, though. I may try to look into some other counties as well to see how they stack up using these same metrics.

EDIT: Added Wayne County/Detroit since it was brought up, which seems to be doing well on overall job numbers, but lagging a bit in GDP growth. Still another I would put landing in the undercounted category overall.

Last edited by ClevelandBrown; 04-28-2021 at 12:59 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2021, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Louisville
4,557 posts, read 4,399,655 times
Reputation: 7879
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandBrown View Post
I agree with the people saying Allegheny/Pittsburgh look like they may be undercounted. I was interested to see where the undercount (110,000) in Ohio may be so ran some numbers for counties in the three Cs, then included Allegheny to it, looking at GDP and job numbers (2016-2020) and compared it to population estimates over that same period.

They haven't released county/metro level estimates for 2020 yet. Where are you getting these numbers from?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2021, 12:00 PM
 
19,633 posts, read 11,324,441 times
Reputation: 34230
Quote:
Originally Posted by 908Boi View Post
Not sure why you are trying to conflate Black and multiracial. There is a lot of black out-migration out of large northern cities but there was a much larger black population there to begin with. A 43k increase isn't nothing but I wouldn't call it impressive. You really cannot compare West Coast cities to East/Southern cities because the demographics/history are just different.

See here for comparison to other metros http:////www.city-data.com/forum/cit...l#post59428797 (shout out to @As Above So Below...).
The inward migration to the high skill, high education, high cost of living areas is the best and the brightest from around the planet. You can’t afford the housing otherwise. The Bay Area, DC, Boston, Seattle…. A High School C student with no job skills is never going to be able to afford to live there. The same thing is going to happen in the next group of attractor cities. Austin. Denver. There will be a lot of economically displaced people.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2021, 12:12 PM
 
507 posts, read 328,899 times
Reputation: 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
They haven't released county/metro level estimates for 2020 yet. Where are you getting these numbers from?
I said I only went to 2019 with the county job numbers because, like you said, 2020 numbers aren't out yet (only partial).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-28-2021, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Louisville
4,557 posts, read 4,399,655 times
Reputation: 7879
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClevelandBrown View Post
I said I only went to 2019 with the county job numbers because, like you said, 2020 numbers aren't out yet (only partial).
Ok thanks I'm with you
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-29-2021, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
6,718 posts, read 10,285,180 times
Reputation: 5328
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
The US is being passed up plain and simple. There are other countries even on this continent with better immigration, and birth rates than our country, and of the top 10 countries in the world in population, the United States is growing slower than all but China and Russia. Even the fastest growing big states like Texas are growing slower than they did 10-15 years ago. Unless a major upgrade to the countries immigration process happens, I don't see a long term reversal of growth trends, especially not from within. Right now population is just shifting around from one side of the US to the other, and creating more balanced population across the board, but it's not growing strong enough.
Is 330 million people not enough? More people means more pollution, trash, and less natural land. Developed mations should grow slower, it shows they are developed and have proper birth control measures and value work productivity vs human reproductivity.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top