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Old 06-27-2010, 09:17 PM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
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Of the Southern cities on the list of "most born in-state" Baton Rouge and New Orleans in Louisiana, Mobile in Alabama, and Louisville in Kentucky look to be the oldest. I believe Mobile is the most "conservative" of those.

//www.city-data.com/top2/h166.html
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Old 06-28-2010, 02:43 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
Of the Southern cities on the list of "most born in-state" Baton Rouge and New Orleans in Louisiana, Mobile in Alabama, and Louisville in Kentucky look to be the oldest. I believe Mobile is the most "conservative" of those.

//www.city-data.com/top2/h166.html
Is it just me or do I notice that these cities mentioned also have historically a higher number of Catholics than the rest of the South? (meaning before transplants arrived)
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Old 06-28-2010, 04:28 AM
 
Location: 30-40°N 90-100°W
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Do you mean I'm biasing it? I could be on an unconscious level, but I didn't know Louisville was as Catholic as it is. I suppose I should have listed some other cities on that list that are old.

Macon, Georgia is pretty old and looks fairly Protestant. Owensboro, Kentucky is pretty old although it looks fairly Catholic too. Someone here told me that it's more Midwestern, but I don't know enough to say. It is the home of the "International Bluegrass Music Museum." Jackson, Tennessee is moderately old and looks very Baptist.

I think part of why many of the Southern cities with few "out-of-state residents" are more Catholic is because many of them are in or near Louisiana. Louisiana, in percentage terms, seems to get about the least transplants. Or at least it has cities with a relatively strong, by US standards, "rootedness." Louisiana is more Catholic than most of the South.
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Old 06-28-2010, 04:41 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Thomas R. View Post
Do you mean I'm biasing it? I could be on an unconscious level, but I didn't know Louisville was as Catholic as it is. I suppose I should have listed some other cities on that list that are old.

Macon, Georgia is pretty old and looks fairly Protestant. Owensboro, Kentucky is pretty old although it looks fairly Catholic too. Someone here told me that it's more Midwestern, but I don't know enough to say. It is the home of the "International Bluegrass Music Museum." Jackson, Tennessee is moderately old and looks very Baptist.

I think part of why many of the Southern cities with few "out-of-state residents" are more Catholic is because many of them are in or near Louisiana. Louisiana, in percentage terms, seems to get about the least transplants. Or at least it has cities with a relatively strong, by US standards, "rootedness." Louisiana is more Catholic than most of the South.
It might just be an odd coincidence. Also with Louisiana the growth has avoided the Mississippi River Valley and surrounding areas. The nearest areas of growth to it are either in the Piedmont area, Nashville, or Houston. Actually I was thinking what seperates states and areas of the South that has grown significantly in the last 50 years to areas that haven't? Is there any particular reason for all of it?
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Old 06-28-2010, 04:43 AM
 
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Memphis is fairly old-fashioned and unchanged for a city of its size. There are hardly any transplants coming here. I know a lot of people who are from Michigan & Chicago, but they all seem Southern. So the few transplants we do have aren't changing the culture much.

It's funny though because people from small towns in TN act as if they're leaving the South when they enter Memphis. People from the country don't think of Memphis as a very Southern place, maybe because of the more neutral accent, or the more liberal politics. The rest of TN has pretty much disowned Memphis
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Old 06-28-2010, 05:13 AM
 
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The OP should be aware that the cultures of Knoxville and Roanoke are Appalachian more than classical Southern.

Chattanooga is a little of both but it is being invaded by Germans (VW).
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Old 06-28-2010, 05:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
The OP should be aware that the cultures of Knoxville and Roanoke are Appalachian more than classical Southern.

Chattanooga is a little of both but it is being invaded by Germans (VW).
Well I picture Chattanooga is among the next cities to start growing in the region. Aren't there a few that will likely start changing soon or just starting to?
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Old 06-28-2010, 06:17 PM
 
Location: USA
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I think Louisiana and the Mississippi Valley scare people because of the amount of exotica (gators for example) and the hot humid climate and flat terrain. At least that seems to be the perception. In addition, no tourist quality coastline. I'm ok with it.
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Old 06-28-2010, 06:21 PM
 
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Downtown Knoxville has changed remarkably in the last 5 years (for the better), outside that and a few surrounding neighborhoods it's still more of the same.

I think the biggest change you'll see in the region is Johnson City, now that the interstate connection has opened up I expect there will be a lot of "refugees" who want to be near Asheville but can't afford the high prices.
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Old 06-28-2010, 06:45 PM
 
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Pine Bluff, Arkansas
Jackson, Tennessee
Greenville, Mississippi
Beaumont, Texas
Monroe, Louisiana
Columbus, Georgia
Pensacola, Florida
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