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Old 06-27-2009, 04:00 PM
 
2,106 posts, read 6,396,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB Fla View Post
I thought the Great lake states sounded good, but New York and Pennsylvania also border the lakes and are certainly not midwestern.
At the same time... I find Cleveland shares more similarities to Pittsburgh or Buffalo then say Omaha or Des Moines.
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Old 06-27-2009, 05:12 PM
 
27 posts, read 109,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
At the same time... I find Cleveland shares more similarities to Pittsburgh or Buffalo then say Omaha or Des Moines.
Well Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Buffalo are all cities. Omaha and Des Moines aren't really. Cleveland is much more like Detroit or Chicago, which are cities, and which aren't particularly northeastern.

Also I would Argue Pittsburgh isn't a Northeastern city as much as an Appalachian one, if such a thing could exist.
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Old 06-28-2009, 08:56 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 7,942,468 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
At the same time... I find Cleveland shares more similarities to Pittsburgh or Buffalo then say Omaha or Des Moines.
I actually think it shares more similaries to Detroit than to Pittsburgh or Buffalo. Driving through Detroit and Cleveland those two cities feel very similar to each other. Cleveland is much hillier, but Buffalo felt significantly different from Cleveland...much more Northern and Northeastern...it's not the Midwest. Omaha and Des Moines are much farther away from Cleveland than Pittsburgh and Buffalo..not to mention neither of those cities are in the Rust Belt and are practically Great Plains cities (at least Omaha is). They are not Great Lakes cities either.
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Old 06-28-2009, 09:02 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeSoHood View Post
I don't find much similarities between Ohio and Indiana, despite them bordering each other. Heck, Ohio is different then most of the Midwest other than south Michigan, Northern Illinois, and the Milwaukee region. Other than that, I can't agree that these areas show more similarities then differences.

I actually find Northeast Ohio more of a northeastern city (not Midwest), Columbus being midwest, and Cincinnati being similar to St. Louis with mixed influences. I mean, Ohio has 6 cities with over 200,000 and they all differ so much.. that alone tells you how hard it is to compare all the midwest to each other. It's a silly category to be honest.
Cincinnati and St. Louis are distinctly Midwestern cities...the most mixed they get is a few Southern influences. Northeast Ohio is not Northeastern...it feels like Southeast Michigan to me or Northern Illinois except more Eastern. I can't agree with you that Ohio and Indiana aren't that similar. Ohio is far more simialr to Indiana than it is to Pennsylvania. Ohio not being different from those other regions you mentioned makes it quintessential midwestern in many ways. You contradicted your own statements. Cincinnati, Columbus, and Cleveland are easier to group into one category than they are to separate...I have been to all three cities and they all feel like Midwestern cities. Cleveland is like Detroit, Columbus is like Indianapolis, and Cincinnati is like St. Louis and Kansas City. I agree Ohio has some Northeastern influences. As far as the Midwest being a silly category, each region has big differences throughout. The South is a heavily varied region...so is the Northeast. If you think each region needs to be identical in all of its parts, you are badly misguided.
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Old 06-28-2009, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randoman5 View Post
Well Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Buffalo are all cities. Omaha and Des Moines aren't really. Cleveland is much more like Detroit or Chicago, which are cities, and which aren't particularly northeastern.

Also I would Argue Pittsburgh isn't a Northeastern city as much as an Appalachian one, if such a thing could exist.
Not to sound snippy here, but have you ever been to Omaha? The city itself is bigger than Pittsburgh, though the metro is smaller. It's a city by any standard I know of, except it doesn't have any major league sports.

Cleveland is a considerably smaller city than Chicago or Detroit.

Pittsburgh is def. the northeast.
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Old 06-28-2009, 10:05 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Not to sound snippy here, but have you ever been to Omaha? The city itself is bigger than Pittsburgh, though the metro is smaller. It's a city by any standard I know of, except it doesn't have any major league sports.

Cleveland is a considerably smaller city than Chicago or Detroit.

Pittsburgh is def. the northeast.
Yes, but while Cleveland may be considerably smaller than Chicago and Detroit, those are the two cities it has the most similarities too...throw Milwaukee in there as well to cities resembling Cleveland. Cleveland in my opinion is like a smaller version of Detroit.
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Old 06-28-2009, 10:07 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, MO
3,742 posts, read 7,942,468 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Not to sound snippy here, but have you ever been to Omaha? The city itself is bigger than Pittsburgh, though the metro is smaller. It's a city by any standard I know of, except it doesn't have any major league sports.

Cleveland is a considerably smaller city than Chicago or Detroit.

Pittsburgh is def. the northeast.
Not to mention, Des Moines barely a city? That's a good one. Look at its skyline and you will see it to be a city. Des Moines is comparable in size to Dayton, Springfield (MO), Madison, Grand Rapids, and Akron.
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Old 06-28-2009, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,351 posts, read 115,763,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf131 View Post
Not to mention, Des Moines barely a city? That's a good one. Look at its skyline and you will see it to be a city. Des Moines is comparable in size to Dayton, Springfield (MO), Madison, Grand Rapids, and Akron.
I agree. It's also the capital of Iowa. I just haven't spent a lot of time there. My DH is from Omaha, grew up in the city, and I've spent tons of time there.
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Old 06-28-2009, 10:04 PM
 
2,601 posts, read 4,674,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randoman5 View Post
Well Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Buffalo are all cities. Omaha and Des Moines aren't really. Cleveland is much more like Detroit or Chicago, which are cities, and which aren't particularly northeastern.

Also I would Argue Pittsburgh isn't a Northeastern city as much as an Appalachian one, if such a thing could exist.
I find it annoying when someone is dismissive of a city because it's located in either Nebraska or Iowa. Omaha and Des Moines aren't cities? Google them and look at images, if you can be bothered. To say they aren't cities as casually as you did, is wrong on all levels.
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Old 06-29-2009, 05:02 PM
 
1,911 posts, read 3,600,311 times
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The Confines of Naught.

There's a reason all the creative types/musicians/artists want to live on either the East Coast or West. Something about having an ocean nearby that reaches to another part of the world is something most in the midwest don't understand, or care to understand because they're programmed to be extra defensive all the time.

Watch someone counter with saying "well, this band is originally from the midwest". They always have a response for everything they don't like, the midwestern mentality is very straitjacketed, and I can tell you this having lived both on the coast and in the midwest.
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