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Old 10-22-2008, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles-213.323.310.818/San Diego-619.858.760
705 posts, read 3,127,922 times
Reputation: 444

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The 2008 Global Cities Index

Cities bear the brunt of the world’s financial meltdowns, crime waves, and climate crises in ways national governments never will. So, when Foreign Policy, A.T. Kearney, and The Chicago Council on Global Affairs teamed up to measure globalization around the world, we focused on the 60 cities that shape our lives the most.

National governments may shape the broad outlines of globalization, but where does it really play out? Where are globalization’s successes and failures most acute? Where else but the places where most of humanity now chooses to live and work—cities. The world’s biggest, most interconnected cities help set global agendas, weather transnational dangers, and serve as the hubs of global integration. They are the engines of growth for their countries and the gateways to the resources of their regions. In many ways, the story of globalization is the story of urbanization.

But what makes a “global city”? The term itself conjures a command center for the cognoscenti. It means power, sophistication, wealth, and influence. To call a global city your own suggests that the ideas and values of your metropolis shape the world. And, to a large extent, that’s true. The cities that host the biggest capital markets, elite universities, most diverse and well-educated populations, wealthiest multinationals, and most powerful international organizations are connected to the rest of the world like nowhere else. But, more than anything, the cities that rise to the top of the list are those that continue to forge global links despite intensely complex economic environments. They are the ones making urbanization work to their advantage by providing the vast opportunities of global integration to their people; measuring cities’ international presence captures the most accurate picture of the way the world works.

So, Foreign Policy teamed up with A.T. Kearney and The Chicago Council on Global Affairs to create the Global Cities Index, a uniquely comprehensive ranking of the ways in which cities are integrating with the rest of the world. In constructing this index of the world’s most global cities, we have collected and analyzed a broad array of data, as well as tapped the brainpower of such renowned cities experts as Saskia Sassen, Witold Rybczynski, Janet Abu-Lughod, and Peter Taylor.

Specifically, the Global Cities Index ranks cities’ metro areas according to 24 metrics across five dimensions. The first is business activity: including the value of its capital markets, the number of Fortune Global 500 firms headquartered there, and the volume of the goods that pass through the city. The second dimension measures human capital, or how well the city acts as a magnet for diverse groups of people and talent. This includes the size of a city’s immigrant population, the number of international schools, and the percentage of residents with university degrees. The third dimension is information exchange—how well news and information is dispersed about and to the rest of the world. The number of international news bureaus, the amount of international news in the leading local papers, and the number of broadband subscribers round out that dimension.

The final two areas of analysis are unusual for most rankings of globalized cities or states. The fourth is cultural experience, or the level of diverse attractions for international residents and travelers. That includes everything from how many major sporting events a city hosts to the number of performing arts venues it boasts. The final dimension— political engagement—measures the degree to which a city influences global policymaking and dialogue. How? By examining the number of embassies and consulates, major think tanks, international organizations, sister city relationships, and political conferences a city hosts. We learned long ago that globalization is much more than the simple lowering of market barriers and economic walls. And because the Global Cities Index pulls in these measures of cultural, social, and policy indicators, it offers a more complete picture of a city’s global standing—not simply economic or financial ties.

The 60 cities included in this first Global Cities Index run the gamut of the modern urban experience. There’s thriving, wealthy London, with its firmly entrenched global networks built on the city’s history as capital of an empire. But there are also Chongqing, Dhaka, and Lagos, cities whose recent surges tell us a great deal about the direction globalization is heading and whose experiences offer lessons to other aspiring global cities. The cities we highlight are world leaders in important areas such as finance, policymaking, and culture. A few are megacities in the developing world whose demand for resources means they must nurture close ties with their neighbors and provide services to large numbers of immigrants. Some are gateways to their region. Others host important international institutions. In other words, they represent a broad cross section of the world’s centers of commerce, culture, and communication.

THE WINNER’S CIRCLE

So, which city topped them all? If anything, the results prove there is no such thing as a perfect global city; no city dominated all dimensions of the index. However, a few came close. New York emerged as the No. 1 global city this year, followed by London, Paris, and Tokyo. The Big Apple beat out other global powerhouses largely on the back of its financial markets, through the networks of its multinationals, and by the strength of its diverse creative class. Overall runner-up London won the cultural dimension by a mile, with Paris and New York trailing far behind. Perhaps surprisingly for a city known more for museums than modems, third-ranked Paris led the world in the information exchange category. No. 4 Tokyo ranked highly thanks to its strong showing in business. And, though it finished 11th overall, Washington easily beat out New York, Brussels, and Paris as the leader in global policy.

Although the winners may be the usual suspects, they have plenty of new competition on their heels. Buoyed by their strong financial links, Hong Kong and Singapore finished at fifth and seventh, respectively. Chicago’s strong human-capital performance sent it into the eighth spot. What’s more, several strong performers are emerging from formerly closed societies: Beijing (No. 12), Moscow (19), Shanghai (20), and Dubai (27). The new, sometimes abbreviated, often state-led, paths to global dominance these cities are treading threaten the old formulas that London, New York, and Los Angeles (No. 6) followed to reach their high spots.

As diverse as they are, the most successful global cities have several things in common: As New York proves, global cities are those that excel across multiple dimensions. Even Shanghai’s staggering, decades-long double-digit annual economic growth alone can’t make it global. The city also must determine how to use that wealth to influence policy, attract the brightest young minds, and accurately portray the rest of the world to its citizens. Global cities continuously adapt to changing circumstances. London may be the city hardest hit by the global credit crunch, but chances are that it will leverage its abundant global financial ties to bounce back. Singapore, San Francisco (15), and Mexico City (25) will no doubt be taking notes.

As the world readjusts to the fits and starts of a volatile global economy, as well as other transnational problems such as climate change, human trafficking, and fuel shortages, the Global Cities Index will track the way cities maneuver as their populations grow and the world shrinks. Although we can’t predict next year’s winner, the odds are good that New York will have to fight to stay on top.

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How to Be a Global City

There is no single correct path a city should tread to become global. But how should cities that want to boost their international profile go about it? They could follow any of the tried-and-true models that came before them. Just look at the various ways some of this year’s 60 global cities manage to use urbanization and globalization to their advantage.

Open Cities

What they look like: Large cities with a free press, open markets, easy access to information and technology, low barriers to foreign trade and investment, and loads of cultural opportunities. They often rely on a heavy service industry and are outward looking, rather than focused on domestic affairs.

Who they are: New York (#1), London (#2), Paris (#3)

Lifestyle Centers

What they look like: Laid-back cities that enjoy a high quality of life and focus on having fun. They attract worldly people and offer cultural experiences to spare.

Who they are: Los Angeles (#6), Toronto (#10)

Regional Gateways

What they look like: Efficient economic powerhouses with favorable incentives for businesses and easy access to the natural resources of their region. They attract smart, well-trained people from around the world, and they often must reinvent themselves to remain competitive.

Who they are: Hong Kong (#5), Singapore (#7), Chicago (#8)

National Leaders

What they look like: Large cities that shape the collective identity of their countries. They usually have homogenous populations, and their new urban policies tend to evoke a shared history. They do well in international business, but not because they’re necessarily globally connected; in these places, foreign firms can find something no other city offers.

Who they are: Tokyo (#4), Seoul (#9), Beijing (#12)

Policy Hubs

What they look like: Cities with outsized influence on national and international policy debates. Their think tanks, international organizations, and political institutions shape policies that affect all people, and they tend to be full of diplomats and journalists from somewhere else.

Who they are: Washington (#11), Brussels (#13)

Platform Cities

What they look like: Large hubs in typically small countries that attract huge amounts of investment through their strategic locations and international connections. Firms don’t set up shop in these cities to invest in the local economy; they move there so they can reach important foreign financial markets without dealing with the region’s political headaches.

Who they are: Amsterdam (#23), Dubai (#27), Copenhagen (#36)

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Old 10-22-2008, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles-213.323.310.818/San Diego-619.858.760
705 posts, read 3,127,922 times
Reputation: 444
Wanted to share. Hold your horses everyone....
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Old 10-22-2008, 08:20 PM
 
12,598 posts, read 35,162,618 times
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Atlanta's in the top 60 global cities, but Houston isn't. Some people in this forum from Texas are going to have a fit.
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Old 10-22-2008, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Mission Viejo, CA
2,498 posts, read 10,680,262 times
Reputation: 1611
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
Atlanta's in the top 60 global cities, but Houston isn't. Some people in this forum from Texas are going to have a fit.
Yes, that surprises me a bit too.
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Old 10-22-2008, 08:33 PM
 
Location: San Diego
100 posts, read 131,676 times
Reputation: 28
^^ What happen to Houston? Did it's global status dissipate into the air?
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Old 10-22-2008, 08:48 PM
 
Location: San Diego
100 posts, read 131,676 times
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good to see Rio de jeneiro on the list finally
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Old 10-22-2008, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,988 posts, read 32,215,031 times
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I know I'm going to sound like a typical texan, but where the hell is Houston???
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Old 10-22-2008, 10:11 PM
 
Location: The land of sugar... previously Houston and Austin
5,429 posts, read 13,732,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jluke65780 View Post
I know I'm going to sound like a typical texan, but where the hell is Houston???
Must just be different ways of measuring; I saw another of these kinds of lists that had Houston and Dallas on the same tier as Boston, and above Atlanta and Miami.

I think that list also has some cities on other continents listed that I do not see on the above.

GaWC - The World According to GaWC
GaWC - Inventory of World Cities
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Old 10-22-2008, 10:45 PM
 
Location: yeah
5,716 posts, read 15,184,963 times
Reputation: 2921
fluffy **** piece
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Old 10-22-2008, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Piedmont, CA
34,203 posts, read 59,050,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krudmonk View Post
fluffy **** piece
at best.

Quote:
London may be the city hardest hit by the global credit crunch, but chances are that it will leverage its abundant global financial ties to bounce back. Singapore, San Francisco (15), and Mexico City (25) will no doubt be taking notes.
Oh puhleeze, The Bay Area owns the patent on economic resilience. We rise and fall in cycles that everybody here anticipates and deals with-that's the Silicon Valley mindset. 5 years ago we were in the pits and today SF has the strongest economy in California and remain the most productive region in the US if not the world.

If anything, London is the one taking the notes.
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