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Old 03-13-2009, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Sandy Springs, Georgia
256 posts, read 688,247 times
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There are so many instances in the United States where a city is built on a river and then that same river is used as the border between the next state. Then the metro area (sometimes even the urban core) is evenly split between two states. I've never lived in these cities, but it seems like this would be somewhat problematic.

Notable cities like this are New York City (although the Hudson is a very wide river), St. Louis (split between Missouri and Illinois), Philadelphia (in this case even the urban core is split), Washington D.C. (D.C., Virginia, and Maryland) Portland (Oregon and Washington), Cincinnati (Ohio and Kentucky), Louisville (Kentucky and Indiana), Kansas City (Kansas and Missouri), Memphis (in this case, three states), Omaha (Nebraska and Iowa), and I guess to some degree the Twin Cities.

Should the state borders be modified so that metropolitan areas lie only in one state?

Last edited by Sandy Springs Rep.; 03-13-2009 at 11:46 PM..
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Old 03-13-2009, 11:29 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 49,148,876 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandy Springs Rep. View Post
There are so many instances in the United States where a city is built on a river and then that same river is used as the border between the next state. Then the metro area (sometimes even the urban core) is evenly split between two states. I've never lived in these cities, but it seems like this would be somewhat problematic.

Notable cities like this are New York City (although the Hudson is a very wide river), St. Louis (split between Missouri and Illinois), Philadelphia (in this case even the urban core is split), Washington D.C. (D.C., Virginia, and Maryland) Portland (Oregon and Washington), Cincinnati (Ohio and Kentucky), Louisville(Kentucky and Indiania), Kansas City (Kansas and Missouri), Memphis (in this case, three states), Omaha (Nebraska and Iowa), and I guess to some degree the Twin Cities.

Should the state borders be modified so that metropolitan areas lie only in one state?
I think it can create 'twin cities' like in St. Louis or Kansas City, and perhaps in the case of Philadelphia the lack of city governmental unity is a bad thing for the metro area as a whole. Kansas City, MO and Kansas City, KS are really two different cities with two different centres.

In New York it doesn't seem to be a problem because New Jersey is not really part of Greater New York, as in the five boroughs, it just happens to border New York.
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Old 03-14-2009, 12:25 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,115 posts, read 37,726,000 times
Reputation: 15610
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandy Springs Rep. View Post
There are so many instances in the United States where a city is built on a river and then that same river is used as the border between the next state. Then the metro area (sometimes even the urban core) is evenly split between two states. I've never lived in these cities, but it seems like this would be somewhat problematic.

Notable cities like this are New York City (although the Hudson is a very wide river), St. Louis (split between Missouri and Illinois), Philadelphia (in this case even the urban core is split), Washington D.C. (D.C., Virginia, and Maryland) Portland (Oregon and Washington), Cincinnati (Ohio and Kentucky), Louisville (Kentucky and Indiana), Kansas City (Kansas and Missouri), Memphis (in this case, three states), Omaha (Nebraska and Iowa), and I guess to some degree the Twin Cities.

Should the state borders be modified so that metropolitan areas lie only in one state?
I don't see the point of this, since none of the actual cities traverse the borders...just their metro areas. Even 'twin cities' like Bristol, VA/TN and Texarkana AR/TX would likely not want to change the status quo, since that would mean giving up their unique status.
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Old 03-14-2009, 12:48 AM
 
Location: Sandy Springs, Georgia
256 posts, read 688,247 times
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Yeah, that's the big problem. If anybody ever proposing changing the borders of a state, people would probably fight it vehemently, simply because they've grown accustomed to where they live and don't want it suddenly inside a different state. I think this is silly, though. It makes so much more sense and the original reason rivers were used as the boundary between two states was because they actually created a barrier between the two states. Now we have roads and interstates that go across them every half mile. It just doesn't make sense anymore.
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Old 03-14-2009, 01:08 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
2,650 posts, read 5,421,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
In New York it doesn't seem to be a problem because New Jersey is not really part of Greater New York, as in the five boroughs, it just happens to border New York.
Dude, you're a NY'er & don't even realize it.
They love NJ's money, man power, intellectual pool, our suburbs (yes, you do NY. Otherwise, you would not infest us like you do) & yet, they want to exclude us from the Metro.
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Old 03-14-2009, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Southeast Missouri
5,812 posts, read 17,382,734 times
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No reason to modify state borders.

And St. Louis isn't really evenly split. Of the 2.8 million in St. Louis Metro area, I think over 2 million are on the Missouri side.
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Old 03-14-2009, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
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The Indiana side of the Louisville metro is not a big city at all. It is a series of teeny tiny towns.
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Old 03-14-2009, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Western Hoosierland
18,264 posts, read 7,835,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missymomof3 View Post
The Indiana side of the Louisville metro is not a big city at all. It is a series of teeny tiny towns.

The cities of Jefferson, New Albany, and Clarksville,Indiana all three have populations greater than 30K. They are just a stones throw across the river from Louisville
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Old 03-14-2009, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 20,612,244 times
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Originally Posted by gdude View Post
The cities of Jefferson, New Albany, and Clarksville,Indiana all three have populations greater than 30K. They are just a stones throw across the river from Louisville
Jeffersonville has 28,621 people (per wikipedia), New Albany has 37,603 and Clarksville has 21,400. Not exactly large. Maybe they just seem tiny I do know that a lawyer I did an externship for a while back said that Indiana is hard because so many people are related to each other. Yes, they are just across the river but they aren't what I would call a "city" as much as a town.
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Old 03-14-2009, 08:34 AM
 
12,548 posts, read 35,038,141 times
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There's almost nothing across the river from Memphis except miles and miles of soybean fields and flood plains. The decaying town of West Memphis, Arkansas, is several miles from Memphis and barely has anything to do with the city.

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