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Old 04-02-2009, 01:29 PM
 
686 posts, read 1,573,423 times
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orange to dark green is rural. sorry couldn't find one that shows the entire U.S. .



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Old 04-02-2009, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Teaneck, NJ
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So white and blue are just either urban or non-forested.. I'm non-forested then with a whole lot of urban around me.

Looks like ME got the most forest
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Old 04-02-2009, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Concrete jungle where dreams are made of.
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lol no forest at all for a span of about 70 miles of NYC metro. Not surprised.

But there are pine barrens on east Long Island, so there are dabs of it here and there. Nothing large and noticeable on a map though.
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Old 04-02-2009, 05:14 PM
Status: "Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,367 posts, read 20,084,777 times
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Depending on your definition of forested, these pictures all taken within about 40 miles of Manhattan, may force a different interpretation of that map. Just because an area has a high population density does not make it a treeless sprawl.



Iona Island in the Hudson and No. Westchester/Putnam counties. The furthest hills are likely in Connecticut.





Looking across southern Rockland County and Northern New Jersey towards the Manhattan skyline on the horizon and the encroaching sprawl.


ABQConvict
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Old 04-02-2009, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Albany (school) NYC (home)
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I love hills so much. Every time I leave Long Island and visit my mom in PA I marvel at the hills/mountains. It greatly increases the way a town looks.
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Old 04-02-2009, 09:17 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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The white areas just say "No Forest" so it could be urban OR it could be heavy farmlands. Parts of southern PA, central Maryland, Delmarva, upstate NY near the Great Lakes, and of course 1/2 of Ohio is intense farmlands not built up urban. The light green areas seen in parts of New York and Pennsylvania are more mixed farms and woods - probably dairy farms mostly.
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Old 04-02-2009, 09:27 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,544 posts, read 10,846,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Depending on your definition of forested, these pictures all taken within about 40 miles of Manhattan, may force a different interpretation of that map. Just because an area has a high population density does not make it a treeless sprawl.



Iona Island in the Hudson and No. Westchester/Putnam counties. The furthest hills are likely in Connecticut.





Looking across southern Rockland County and Northern New Jersey towards the Manhattan skyline on the horizon and the encroaching sprawl.


ABQConvict
Nice photos. Its hard to see most parks and forests when they butt up against the populated areas unless they are very large (you can see Harriman SP if you know where to look). You CAN pick out in New Jersey, the wild Pine Barrens, Belleplain SF in the south and even Highpoint SP in the far NW end of the state. New Jersey does have other wild forests like the Delaware Water Gap NRA, the Great Swamp NWR and Allamuchy Mountain SP but they are hard to see on this map.
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Old 04-02-2009, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Global citizen
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that last picture of the NYC sky line is amazing
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Old 04-02-2009, 09:39 PM
 
5,969 posts, read 8,279,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newarkbomb View Post
I'm non-forested then with a whole lot of urban around me.
Same with where I am at.
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