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Old 08-06-2013, 10:10 PM
 
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Nebraska, but I am biased.
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Old 08-07-2013, 08:46 PM
 
Location: C-U metro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
Those. Oklahoma is way too Conservative for my taste. I like college towns. But I doubt Tulsa would do it for me. ORU isn't actually a regular university.
ORU has come along way once the Roberts family got thrown out. They actually are accredited in the majority of their majors now. Apparently, Orel didn't believe in people who didn't kowtow to Orel.

I'd rather live in Tulsa but then I am biased. I'd prefer if Eastern OK was a separate state from Western OK like it was supposed to be. Lawton and smaller towns in Western OK tend to be represented by the nut-burgers of our legislature. The east isn't immune but we have a smaller percentage of elected officials who do stupid things like wanting to regulate the temperature they sell strong beer at in a liquor store.
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Old 08-07-2013, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
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Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Surprisingly, they are all very different from each other. I lived in Kansas for many years, and have traveled about quite a lot in the other two. They are so different, I'd be disinclined to express a preference for any one of them, but their good and bad points are alll different.
Very curious for you to explain the differences between Kansas and Nebraska.
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Old 08-07-2013, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
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I picked Nebraska in this "poll" a few years ago.

I went to Nebraska yesterday. I don't know if this is a case of "the heart grows fonder", but I might say I like Kansas better now (however, the last time I was there was 2008). I really like the Kansas City area, but would also probably choose to live on the Missouri side, if given the opportunity.

Now, for Nebraska. We drove from Denver to Grand Island. There is an amazing contrast in landscapes/human settling patterns when crossing the state line from Colorado over to Nebraska. The last little bit of Colorado is rolling, dry, and basically not populated at all. Nebraska is extremely farmed, it feels like people live there, you start seeing trees, and green, etc, which in theory I like, but I was pretty bored by it to be honest.

I did not find the people of Grand Island to be warm in the least, and found the town to be pretty average overall, and not worth any sort of hype, and not particularly deserving of any of my personal desire to ever want to live there.

I am still interested in visiting Omaha, which I have yet to ever do. I was very underwhelmed by the trip yesterday, which is a disappointment, because I was actually looking forward to it prior (within Nebraska I had never been further east than North Platte).
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Old 08-09-2013, 11:41 AM
 
2,209 posts, read 2,863,382 times
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Oklahoma is has some very pretty isolated landforms (Oachitas, the Arbuckles) but as a whole is the least visually attractive of the three. Eastern Kansas is prettier than Eastern Nebraska. Western Nebraska is prettier than western Kansas.

Nebraska has the best city of the three, Omaha. Tulsa is the second nicest city.

Kansas has the nicest town, Lawrence, and should get credit for including a large a relatively nice swath of the KC metro (which is a better city than anything in Nebraska or Oklahoma).

Oklahoma has the advantage of having 2 mid-sized cities.

All three have their fair share of dying and slummy small towns and cities, with a sprinkling of quaint small towns thrown in.

Kansas and Nebraska are culturally midwestern and are fairly similar, Oklahoma is not.
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Old 08-09-2013, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
Oklahoma is has some very pretty isolated landforms (Oachitas, the Arbuckles) but as a whole is the least visually attractive of the three. Eastern Kansas is prettier than Eastern Nebraska. Western Nebraska is prettier than western Kansas.
I would say eastern Oklahoma is way more attractive than eastern Kansas. Not even close.
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Old 08-09-2013, 10:55 PM
 
2,209 posts, read 2,863,382 times
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Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
I would say eastern Oklahoma is way more attractive than eastern Kansas. Not even close.
You are totally entitled to that opinion. There are certainly some lovely parts of Oklahoma, especially eastern OK, but for my money Kansas (especially the eastern half) is by and large prettier than all but a smattering of Oklahoma, and Kansas' few truly stunning areas I simply think are more unique and more compelling (and also a larger portion of the sum total) than the few truly lovely areas of Oklahoma.

Kansas' prairie regions, the Flint Hills and Smoky Hills are a true one of a kind natural area, the nee plus ultra of the most endangered American (and global) ecosystem, one that is linked into the national character in a critical and deep way and they make up a sizeable portion of the eastern half of the state. Oklahoma's "mountains" are lovely, but certainly not the loveliest exemplars of the form, even within the immediate region, and they don't make up much of Oklahoma, not even eastern Oklahoma. Its lakes strike me as nice ammenities to have, but again they aren't even the prettiest man-made lakes in the region, and they seem fairly indistinguishable to me from the garden variety reservoirs that pepper the lower midwest and great plains.
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Old 08-10-2013, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Oklahoma
14,783 posts, read 10,739,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
You are totally entitled to that opinion. There are certainly some lovely parts of Oklahoma, especially eastern OK, but for my money Kansas (especially the eastern half) is by and large prettier than all but a smattering of Oklahoma, and Kansas' few truly stunning areas I simply think are more unique and more compelling (and also a larger portion of the sum total) than the few truly lovely areas of Oklahoma.

Kansas' prairie regions, the Flint Hills and Smoky Hills are a true one of a kind natural area, the nee plus ultra of the most endangered American (and global) ecosystem, one that is linked into the national character in a critical and deep way and they make up a sizeable portion of the eastern half of the state. Oklahoma's "mountains" are lovely, but certainly not the loveliest exemplars of the form, even within the immediate region, and they don't make up much of Oklahoma, not even eastern Oklahoma. Its lakes strike me as nice ammenities to have, but again they aren't even the prettiest man-made lakes in the region, and they seem fairly indistinguishable to me from the garden variety reservoirs that pepper the lower midwest and great plains.
Oklahoma's Ecoregions

Bureau of Water, Watershed Management Section, Kansas Ecoregions Map

I would agree that certain parts of eastern Kansas are very pretty and unique but Oklahoma has a lot more variation as indicated above.

To say that Broken Bow Lake, Sardis Lake, Tenkiller, McGee Creek, Clayton Lake, Wister Lake, and others look like "garden variety" lakes in the midwest and great plains just isn't accurate.

All that being said, I think all three states in this discussion are much more attractive than than outsiders think (it least in parts).

Last edited by eddie gein; 08-10-2013 at 06:21 AM..
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