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Old 09-16-2007, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
3 posts, read 11,445 times
Reputation: 11

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Friendliest town in GA? I have recently been surfing the web and have become aware that there have been segregated proms being held. Now, I have read that the proms are privately paid for by parents, and that they are not necessarily afilliated with the schools, but I am not sure how true that is.

Other than keeping up with the so called "tradition", why is this happening, and being supported? How does this constitute being the friendliest little town? Is it really friendly, for everyone?

Prior to finding the segregated prom postings online, I visited the little town several times, and read its history, which is interesting. While there, I found that everyone seems to be friendly, although I ate at a local pizza parlor, and while the food was good, I don't think I will be a returning patron. The theme was focused on history, primarily around the civil war period.

Some of the pictures posted were a bit much for this day and time--blacks eating watermelon on the front porch, saying "it sur'ms good", or something like that. The posting was for Durham Tobbaco, which was pretty significant during the civil war, but still this is modern day, and, in my opinion, I believe the merchant could be more patron friendly by posting more modern day pictures. Or at least other pictures of that time, like Frederick Douglas, pictures of famous troups who actually won medals of honors for their involvement in the Civil War, Benjamin Bannekar, etc.

I am really interested in chatting with people from this area, or surrounding areas. My biggest question is, how thin is the line between racism and tradition?

JIGGSONIAN

Last edited by Jiggsonian; 09-16-2007 at 01:00 PM..
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Old 09-16-2007, 04:17 PM
 
3,670 posts, read 4,185,003 times
Reputation: 1596
there are many people who see the same dilemma. You can't really display some of these things and consider yourself "friendly" to everyone. At the same time, little by little, everyone is recognizing these things as relics of the past.

I am from Dublin (51% black), which is 20 miles away, and one very problematic display item in Wrightsville and throughout the rural areas of Georgia is the Confederate flag. It is displayed on vehicles sometimes as a political protest of former Governor Barnes' and legislature changing the state flag to exclude the old Confederacy portion of the banner. Folks, the problem is, a flag has got to be something that UNITES everyone and does very little to offend ANYONE, or else you can't call it OUR flag.

It should be obvious, likewise, to any business owner opening your doors to the public that you don't want to offend anyone----you are trying to win their repeat business.

In Georgia, I have to say, there are daily exercises in race relations. We go to work and to school more on a 50/50 basis than almost any other region of the country. And we face into the reality that it is economic and educational conditions that dictate everyone's stations in life. It is when things are going well in one corner that tensions increase.

Now, I hope everyone that puts a Confederate emblem on your vehicle realizes that you are NOT making a political statement and an argument for the preservation of history. There are museums for that. We need our future, and you few are HOLDING US ALL BACK!!!!!

We have to move into the future together united.
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Old 09-16-2007, 06:23 PM
 
Location: The Great City of Macon
511 posts, read 2,324,893 times
Reputation: 122
To correct you it was Sonny who changed the flag. Everything else was correct, but Roy Barnes didnt change the flag.
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Old 09-16-2007, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Port Hueneme, CA
283 posts, read 1,108,398 times
Reputation: 92
Wink hopes this helps

Well GA is sort of special in this aspect. Special in a very good way I might add. Both races that seem to be affected by the confederacy the most understand one another well for the most part throughout GA. While many new residents seem to have a hard time adjusting to the changes on both sides, after a couple of years and inquisitive minds most residents of any race find out that we are not pushing racism in any way. Your thought of history is very correct. Most people from GA are very prideful in their history. We love to flaunt what we have come from and conquered. Keeping our history well known to everyone is the best education to ensure that mistakes made in the past do not once again become our present for any race and not just one or two particular. If you go to any celebration or memorial ceremony in GA for Confederate history or Black / African-American (African-American seems to considered an insult to many blacks in the south because they are most prideful of their history here and know little of their history from Africa for obvious reasons and I would give about a 50/50 split on those who care to even relate it to their present) history you will find both races there celebrating it and not using it as a racist communication between the two. It would be more of a smack in the face to the rest of the racist nation to say look at what we've overcome and because of it we have become a truly united community.

I come from somewhat of a strange past considering my age. I was lucky enough to know a couple slaves and many share croppers that shared a history with my family as once being "owned" by my family. Unfortunately all who actually experienced this have passed and can no longer share their stories. Many of the stories heard were great in how well each race treated each other even then; but, of course then just like today, stories of unfair treatment to a person existed. It was many a day that I heard Mamie and Pompy speak of how they thought. Even after the breaking point of what seemed to be true freedom for blacks came in the 60’s and 70’s they saw where many people and in some cases entire families were better off without these new found “freedoms”. Freedom can become a trap for some and people of all races experience this today. Mamie and Pompy plus their children and children’s children etc. were and still are my family. Some have even become blood relatives over time. I have a very large and extended family that honors each and every race it encounters. While we still acknowledge differences between the races we all know that without one another back then as well as today our lives would be incomplete without each other.

So while I understand that many have been taught to recognize these symbols as symbols of hatred, many of us know that they have not always stood for what some groups have made them and disgraced them to be. Pictures you speak of showing blacks in a “typical” setting of the time may just have been a celebration amongst the blacks of the time. While a picture may say a thousand or more words you can’t fit the entire story into one snapshot. This picture may have even been considered a way to show compassion for a once great friend of the business’ family. Any judgment or mistaken thought to make it something that your experiences or possible poor education of a subject would be incorrect on your part, but totally understandable. You reaching out for knowledge of the subject and/or possible misunderstanding shows greatness on your part. Making any symbol, group or race into a hated or distrusted one because of a few bad apples is the very core of racism itself. I hope this helps explain what seems to be our small town backward ways to outsiders when in all honesty we true Georgians have been quite revolutionary (no pun intended for you sick minded folks) in our thoughts for many, many years.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jiggsonian View Post
Friendliest town in GA? I have recently been surfing the web and have become aware that there have been segregated proms being held. Now, I have read that the proms are privately paid for by parents, and that they are not necessarily afilliated with the schools, but I am not sure how true that is.

Other than keeping up with the so called "tradition", why is this happening, and being supported? How does this constitute being the friendliest little town? Is it really friendly, for everyone?

Prior to finding the segregated prom postings online, I visited the little town several times, and read its history, which is interesting. While there, I found that everyone seems to be friendly, although I ate at a local pizza parlor, and while the food was good, I don't think I will be a returning patron. The theme was focused on history, primarily around the civil war period.

Some of the pictures posted were a bit much for this day and time--blacks eating watermelon on the front porch, saying "it sur'ms good", or something like that. The posting was for Durham Tobbaco, which was pretty significant during the civil war, but still this is modern day, and, in my opinion, I believe the merchant could be more patron friendly by posting more modern day pictures. Or at least other pictures of that time, like Frederick Douglas, pictures of famous troups who actually won medals of honors for their involvement in the Civil War, Benjamin Bannekar, etc.

I am really interested in chatting with people from this area, or surrounding areas. My biggest question is, how thin is the line between racism and tradition?

JIGGSONIAN

Last edited by pickleswanson; 09-16-2007 at 10:20 PM.. Reason: wrong word
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