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Old 09-23-2007, 08:30 AM
 
104 posts, read 382,522 times
Reputation: 82

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Those of you who post on this forum and say I visited Blue Ridge or Ellijay or these other small towns and loved them and I'm going to move there, and I can't wait, etc, etc..I'm just wondering how in the world do/would you spend your time? I can understand stopping in a town and checking out the mom and pop crafts, but how long could a person do that before getting insanely bored. These towns have populations ranging from in the hundreds to three thousand or so and they are isolated. I live in Western Kentucky in a town of 30,000 in a metro area of 250,000 and we are constantly having to drive to Nashville, Louisville, Atlanta, etc...if nothing else just to keep some variety in our lives. I can understand a couple of days (maybe three) away from a major supermarket or Wal Mart or whatever, but actually planning on really living like that would, I think, drive most people to the brink of insanity. Rock climbing and mountain biking are way too physical for most people over 45. Unless you were born there or had relatives there (emphasis on the plural) eating at the Mountain Bear cafe every day and walking the local state park trails would seem to me to be unpractical and unrealistic for a transplant from Florida. I am just curios. Thanx.

Last edited by watchmanonthewall; 09-23-2007 at 08:39 AM..
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Old 09-23-2007, 09:40 AM
 
483 posts, read 1,944,136 times
Reputation: 284
Quote:
Originally Posted by watchmanonthewall View Post
Those of you who post on this forum and say I visited Blue Ridge or Ellijay or these other small towns and loved them and I'm going to move there, and I can't wait, etc, etc..I'm just wondering how in the world do/would you spend your time? I can understand stopping in a town and checking out the mom and pop crafts, but how long could a person do that before getting insanely bored. These towns have populations ranging from in the hundreds to three thousand or so and they are isolated. I live in Western Kentucky in a town of 30,000 in a metro area of 250,000 and we are constantly having to drive to Nashville, Louisville, Atlanta, etc...if nothing else just to keep some variety in our lives. I can understand a couple of days (maybe three) away from a major supermarket or Wal Mart or whatever, but actually planning on really living like that would, I think, drive most people to the brink of insanity.
I can't speak for anyone else, but I consider an inability to cope without regular 'shopping' infusions to be a form of insanity, or at least a good indication of severe airheadedness.
Believe it or not, there are lots more important things you can do with your time other than shopping. Do some volunteer work. Learn something at the local college. Plant a tree. Even feeding the squirrels in your back yard is, in the long run, more important than 'shopping'.
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Old 09-23-2007, 12:25 PM
 
104 posts, read 382,522 times
Reputation: 82
Thank you for taking the time to respond to my post. Since my wife is a college professor we get the opportunity to spend a lot of time in that type of venue. My daughter is in a small private school, and as with most private schools the parents spend a lot of time volunteering so I've got that covered as well. As for me, I'm a trial attorney and therefore probably do qualify as an "airhead". I certainly didn't mean to offend anyone, I was just curious as to how people spend their time in an isolated mountain town. Heck, I might decide to move to one myself. It might be a lot better than what I'm used to. As for spending time shopping, I agree with you, it's not my favorite activity either; however, it is pretty important to my 13 year old daughter and I do enjoy making her happy. Have a great day feeding the squirrels;that kinda sounds fun.
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Old 09-23-2007, 01:49 PM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
9,188 posts, read 30,881,852 times
Reputation: 5171
Quote:
Originally Posted by irvm View Post
Even feeding the squirrels in your back yard is, in the long run, more important than 'shopping'.
The 30lb squirrel in my back yard with fangs might change your mind on that one.

I live in Powder Springs which isn't exactly "Rural", but still it's a smaller town 20-something miles outside of the city in the not-yet-overdeveloped western burbs. I rarely go into the city on a regular basis anyway, anymore. So in a way it's like living in a small isolated town. Photography is my boredom buster, but then I sell pics online for spare money, so it's also sorta-kinda a job, too. Still, it's relaxing and rewarding to a degree.


Shopping is boring unless you have 5 million dollars, which I don't. I will admit though, if you get me near a Costco, I get mental. There's something about putting my arms around a package of 50 rolls of toilet paper that I can't describe... http://bestsmileys.com/love1/7.gif (broken link)
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Old 09-24-2007, 08:06 AM
 
Location: NW GA
136 posts, read 437,108 times
Reputation: 38
I hate shopping. I live in a rural area and spend my time horsebackriding, playing with my dog, home and property improvements and maintenance, visiting with neighbors, enjoying the peace and quiet. I'm never bored and wish I had more time to spend pursuing interests and hobbies.
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Old 09-24-2007, 11:52 PM
 
177 posts, read 912,212 times
Reputation: 88
We live in a SMALL town in a rural area (not in the mountains, though) Some of my friends here in town spend their spare time working on stained glass, making pottery and things like that. These are people who are over 45 and spend their spare time doing things that they've thought about doing earlier in life. Some of these people lead rather busy professional lives and seem to like the feeling of creating something in their spare time. Sometimes they donate items they make to help raise money for local causes. Others do things like taking flying lessons, that they've wanted to do.

Another friend of ours goes regularly to the animal auctions. He raises a few head of cattle. Though we live in the city limits and can only have domesticated animals, I like to go to those as well. The auctions are a sort of meeting place for some of the locals (and a great way to find out what the big deal is about boiled peanuts...tastes like pintos to me) and I find it fun to look at the llamas and other animals. It's kind of fun and hallmark-y to see a kid getting their first pet goat. It's also a great way to meet farmers and get the scoop on who's producing what.

After we moved to Georgia my husband got interested in Civil War history. He knew very little about the Civil War before we moved here. Some of the historic signs around our town and places that we explore started his interest. On the weekends we go exploring around Georgia.

We also spend our time scouting fresh produce, visiting the many farms that sell things like fresh berries, peaches, onions, pecans, and things like that. It's great to make these little treks and share what we buy with our friends. I find it interesting to meet and talk with the farmers, like one of the women in our town who owns an organic farm.

Every couple of weeks or so we head to Madison. It's become a sort of second home to us. Sometimes we stay a few days with Madison as our base and we explore the areas around Madison and Athens.

Since we bought an historic home we look around for antiques and vintage pieces to furnish it. Our modern type furniture sure looked wierd in a 100+ year old house. We've furnished our home with antique and vintage pieces with what we would have spent on one or two nice pieces at a "regular" furniture store. We've made friends in the process as well.

We moved to Georgia from Arizona and as far as we're concerned we landed in Eden. So, we've started growing a lot of our own food (with a lot of advice from local farmers) and also we have flowers blooming every month throughout the year. We can go out almost every day of the year and have flowers to pick and bring inside the house.

We love learning historical tidbits about our town...the local history that people share with us. Plus I LOVE to hear the English that's spoken in our area when people feel comfortable.
When we first moved to a small town, "UPS" was my middle name and we were always going places to shop. Now, I find that we're simply not interested in that kind of shopping anymore. We go to larger cities to shop when we have to, combining shopping with other (now) more interesting things to do. We rarely go to Atlanta.

Our town is tiny, but there is a LOT going on...if you start reading the local paper for places where you might locate, I'll bet you'll find lots of things to do. Maybe things like wood working don't sound real exciting, but when you know someone who can use tree limbs from your OWN property to make bowls for you, it does seem a lot more interesting.

Even in small towns there are usually political organizations and citizen groups that meet...small towns can provide the chance to make a REAL impact as long as it's not the "we did it this way" kind of thing or people rushing in to try and change things.


Our town has an active arts organization that puts on really great social events. We have a gallery and our nearest town has a gallery as well.

Even though we live in a really small town, there are a lot of things going on. We are very happy in our small town, and would never go back to living in a city again.

zebbie
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Old 09-25-2007, 08:07 PM
 
3,670 posts, read 4,175,142 times
Reputation: 1596
I am not from a mountain town, but from a "rural" town. I spend a lot of evenings in the yard, sometimes just watering my grass manually, if there is not other gardening to do. By the way, my wife and I feed the birds and, incidentally, the sly squirrels.

Yesterday evening, there were a couple of deaths in the community, so I baked 3 pie shells (the best I knew how), filled them with fresh strawberries and filling, and topped them off with whipped cream. I then drove around the community visiting with these families, which I hoped, made them feel a little better and made me feel closer to all of them.

This past weekend, I left work a little early, spent 5 hours driving the long way through rural East Georgia (Wow!), and attended a fantastic high school football game in the mountains with about 4,000 people in attendance in a town of only 10,000. On the way there, I had stopped in a great rural downtown, had a wonderful meal of tilapia prepared by a chef (only 16$), and bought my wife a local blend of wine with peaches included. On the way home, I saw at 11:15 p.m, a family with children broke down in a van. I stopped, drove 6 miles back to the nearest town, purchased coolant for their radiator, and dropped it back off with them to get them going again.

On Saturday night, my wife and I went over to my mother-in-law's home, where she lives alone, to enjoy the Georgia-Alabama football game. We kept her up, cheering for the Bulldogs, until midnight.

On Sunday, we rose and went to Sunday School and church together with my college-aged son.

After contemplating your post, besides feeding myself, I only shopped for my wife's birthday wine, some car coolant, and some strawberries. But it was the best weekend!!!
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Old 09-26-2007, 08:06 AM
 
12 posts, read 52,750 times
Reputation: 11
shopping,but just online,like this one ,which i went to often,but that doesn't mean i get too much money,it's just because of its low price,especially some gadgets there,very beautiful,i love it.another site is Gadgets.co.uk - Latest gadgets, gift ideas and novelties new one comes out ,interesting.

have fun
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Old 09-26-2007, 01:38 PM
 
71 posts, read 666,320 times
Reputation: 67
Smile Peace and quiet

Boy, I really enjoyed reading about life in the small towns. There is never nothing to do. Just like the things mentioned, it is life at its best. Even if you just sit on your porch or in the backyard and look at the stars, it is time well spent. Irishvanguard and dejazebbie know how to live. Actually, I think folks tend to get so wrapped up in their frenzied busy life that they don't know how to stop and smell the roses. Roses and other flowers actually have a wonderful scent, but it is sometimes so slight that you really do have to stop and take a minute to sniff. Life anymore is just too hurried. There is something wonderfully peaceful contemplating cloud shapes and stars and ministering to fellow human beings and furry creatures.
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Old 09-26-2007, 05:48 PM
 
Location: NJ
185 posts, read 693,417 times
Reputation: 56
Question Do you mind if I ask where you live? Sounds great!

Quote:
Originally Posted by deja-zebbie View Post
We live in a SMALL town in a rural area (not in the mountains, though) Some of my friends here in town spend their spare time working on stained glass, making pottery and things like that. These are people who are over 45 and spend their spare time doing things that they've thought about doing earlier in life. Some of these people lead rather busy professional lives and seem to like the feeling of creating something in their spare time. Sometimes they donate items they make to help raise money for local causes. Others do things like taking flying lessons, that they've wanted to do.

Another friend of ours goes regularly to the animal auctions. He raises a few head of cattle. Though we live in the city limits and can only have domesticated animals, I like to go to those as well. The auctions are a sort of meeting place for some of the locals (and a great way to find out what the big deal is about boiled peanuts...tastes like pintos to me) and I find it fun to look at the llamas and other animals. It's kind of fun and hallmark-y to see a kid getting their first pet goat. It's also a great way to meet farmers and get the scoop on who's producing what.

After we moved to Georgia my husband got interested in Civil War history. He knew very little about the Civil War before we moved here. Some of the historic signs around our town and places that we explore started his interest. On the weekends we go exploring around Georgia.

We also spend our time scouting fresh produce, visiting the many farms that sell things like fresh berries, peaches, onions, pecans, and things like that. It's great to make these little treks and share what we buy with our friends. I find it interesting to meet and talk with the farmers, like one of the women in our town who owns an organic farm.

Every couple of weeks or so we head to Madison. It's become a sort of second home to us. Sometimes we stay a few days with Madison as our base and we explore the areas around Madison and Athens.

Since we bought an historic home we look around for antiques and vintage pieces to furnish it. Our modern type furniture sure looked wierd in a 100+ year old house. We've furnished our home with antique and vintage pieces with what we would have spent on one or two nice pieces at a "regular" furniture store. We've made friends in the process as well.

We moved to Georgia from Arizona and as far as we're concerned we landed in Eden. So, we've started growing a lot of our own food (with a lot of advice from local farmers) and also we have flowers blooming every month throughout the year. We can go out almost every day of the year and have flowers to pick and bring inside the house.

We love learning historical tidbits about our town...the local history that people share with us. Plus I LOVE to hear the English that's spoken in our area when people feel comfortable.
When we first moved to a small town, "UPS" was my middle name and we were always going places to shop. Now, I find that we're simply not interested in that kind of shopping anymore. We go to larger cities to shop when we have to, combining shopping with other (now) more interesting things to do. We rarely go to Atlanta.

Our town is tiny, but there is a LOT going on...if you start reading the local paper for places where you might locate, I'll bet you'll find lots of things to do. Maybe things like wood working don't sound real exciting, but when you know someone who can use tree limbs from your OWN property to make bowls for you, it does seem a lot more interesting.

Even in small towns there are usually political organizations and citizen groups that meet...small towns can provide the chance to make a REAL impact as long as it's not the "we did it this way" kind of thing or people rushing in to try and change things.


Our town has an active arts organization that puts on really great social events. We have a gallery and our nearest town has a gallery as well.

Even though we live in a really small town, there are a lot of things going on. We are very happy in our small town, and would never go back to living in a city again.

zebbie
Do tell! I'd love to know.
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