U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-13-2017, 11:50 AM
 
1,497 posts, read 979,306 times
Reputation: 695

Advertisements

For all intents and purposes East Texas which includes the big cities of Dallas and HOuston is part of The South.. The food, the culture, the accent.. all very much Southern and you will notice lots of similarities in Georgia.. Yep we all say "y'all" just like they do in East Texas. Now when you get out to West Texas things change dramatically. That's where you get more of the western "twang"..

Btw you will love Savannah.. it is what I would call the "Romantic South" ... moss draped trees... sipping cocktails out on the verandah...it is the genteel south portrayed in a lot of old movies. And since you aree making your way to Savannah via SC I would suggest you also consider visiting Charleston. Charleston is all that Savannah is but just a little bit moreso.

Last edited by AUGnative; 03-13-2017 at 12:00 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-13-2017, 11:54 AM
 
50 posts, read 31,083 times
Reputation: 48
Sounds great

My whole trip is Nashville > Knoxville > Asheville > Athens > Columbia > Charleston > Savannah
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2017, 12:06 PM
 
1,497 posts, read 979,306 times
Reputation: 695
That is a wonderful itenerary... I am guessing you are going to Columbia for a football game? Otherwise Columbia is a pretty bland city. It is the state capital and home to the UNiversity of SC but just doesnt have the cool college town feel of places like Athens. However, Columbia is a good place to experience an unusal Barbecue variation unique to the midlands of SC.. they use a mustard based bbq sauce. It's one of those things you either love or hate depending on your tastes. I would personally try to spend more time in Charleston and less time in Columbia. Lots to see and do in CHarleston.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2017, 05:33 PM
 
50 posts, read 31,083 times
Reputation: 48
I'm not actually going to Columbia for a football game - it was more just to break up the drive a bit between Athens and Charleston (everywhere is a bit closer in the UK so not used to these long drives!).

I was assuming with it having a college there, there would be enough to see and do for one day/night?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2017, 06:20 PM
 
1,497 posts, read 979,306 times
Reputation: 695
Hmmm..yeah, I would not spend much time in Columbia. Good for an overnight stay but other than that just not much to do. It's kind of like a slightly larger version of Augusta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2017, 08:54 PM
 
446 posts, read 232,702 times
Reputation: 622
Quote:
Originally Posted by AUGnative View Post
Actually east Texas accent is very similar to the common Georgia accent that I would call the Piedmont accent. Now people from South Georgia and especially the coastal region will have more of a lilting drawl and tend to not pronounce the "r"s at the end of words. Such as better become "bettah".. butter is buttah.. think the classic Scarlet O'Hara accent. Athens is in the Piedmont region but game days draw people from all over so you will hear a menagerie of Southern regional accents. You will find that Southerners have a great affinity for the British and you will find yourself making friends easily.
Scarlett O'Hara was played by an Englishwoman! LOL. So much for that as a "classic" Southern accent! I think the only actual Southerner among the cast was Alicia Rhett, who was from Savannah.

You will be able to understand the accent well enough at your hotel and most other places, IMO. Maybe not everyone in the stadium on game day, but I am Georgia born and bred and I have trouble understanding some accents in some small towns. Think London and Newcastle or Devon.

So, Texans say "y'all" these days? Cool! I think Texas probably has as many regional accents as England, but yeah, there are similarities between the stereotypical Texas twang and the Georgia drawl.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-22-2017, 09:03 PM
 
446 posts, read 232,702 times
Reputation: 622
P.S. Not only will hotels, etc., sell out early (if they aren't already), the games will too.

One of the biggest November games (probably THE biggest) is the Auburn-Georgia game, the oldest football rivalry in the Southeast. They played in Athens last year so will probably play in Auburn this year, but that will be a great game to see if you want to experience the SEC at its best (and most historic).

(And Auburn is only 180 miles down I-85 from Athens. )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2017, 05:11 AM
 
1,347 posts, read 2,047,932 times
Reputation: 945
Quote:
Originally Posted by AUGnative View Post
Actually east Texas accent is very similar to the common Georgia accent that I would call the Piedmont accent. Now people from South Georgia and especially the coastal region will have more of a lilting drawl and tend to not pronounce the "r"s at the end of words. Such as better become "bettah".. butter is buttah.. think the classic Scarlet O'Hara accent. Athens is in the Piedmont region but game days draw people from all over so you will hear a menagerie of Southern regional accents. You will find that Southerners have a great affinity for the British and you will find yourself making friends easily.
I am a native Georgian from the Atlanta area, and I have and I guess you would call it Piedmont accent. The Brits do seem to love it (I live in the UK for the time being...and I love it here!). I have been asked if I am from Texas before (I'm not keen on Texas particularly, too much sun, plus I feel more southEASTERN rather than southern).

I like to read a bit about early southern American/British American history. It is said that the southeastern US accent is a slowed down version of an early English accent, and that the hard R has persisted because of the influence of the Scots-Irish. The dropped Rs on the southeastern lowcountry are due to the influence of British trade/travel in the 19th century.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top