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Old 04-05-2017, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Jupiter, FL
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I've been following Lake Lanier's water level for 10 years and every year the water level rises significantly in the winter. This year, however, the Corps is hardly letting it budge. We started out the winter roughly 10 feet below full pool and we're still there. We'll have a big rain event and nothing happens. Does anybody know what the deal is?

Lake Lanier Water Level
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Old 04-05-2017, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
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This should answer your question:

Georgia Drought Conditions Interactive Web Map March 28, 2017
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Old 04-05-2017, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Jupiter, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Are those different than the drought maps in my link? We had rain all the time this winter. Something else is going on.
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Old 04-05-2017, 12:02 PM
 
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Not just Lanier.. this is a problem at most Corps managed lakes. The situation is no where near as bad at Lakes Oconee and Sinclair which are not managed by The Corps.
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Old 04-05-2017, 02:22 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU -> DAL -> ATL
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You don't erase a drought just with one or two rain events. Last fall was incredibly dry. Winter wasn't nearly wet enough to overcome that.
Plus, the sources of Lanier and Hartwell (another corps lake) are in the mountains which are under a worse drought than the piedmont.
There are parts of the mountains that are over 20 inches under normal rainfall for the water year (Oct 1 to now).
A lot of Atlanta is near normal for year to date (since Jan 1) but eastern parts are 2 to 4 inches down just in 3 months. The mtns are 6 to almost a foot below normal for the same time period. That's where the inflow to the lakes is but the inflow just isn't enough. They have to maintain enough outflow to maintain electricity generation.
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Old 04-15-2017, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Jupiter, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post
You don't erase a drought just with one or two rain events. Last fall was incredibly dry. Winter wasn't nearly wet enough to overcome that.
Plus, the sources of Lanier and Hartwell (another corps lake) are in the mountains which are under a worse drought than the piedmont.
There are parts of the mountains that are over 20 inches under normal rainfall for the water year (Oct 1 to now).
A lot of Atlanta is near normal for year to date (since Jan 1) but eastern parts are 2 to 4 inches down just in 3 months. The mtns are 6 to almost a foot below normal for the same time period. That's where the inflow to the lakes is but the inflow just isn't enough. They have to maintain enough outflow to maintain electricity generation.
I see. I knew Atlanta had plenty of rain, so I was unaware of the major drought up in the mountains.

I've also been told that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers inexplicably drained 10 feet of the lake last year despite having ample water downstream.
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Old 04-15-2017, 04:25 PM
 
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The situation is not as bad on lakes Oconee and Sinclair.. which are NOT managed by the corps of engineers. Yes the drought up in the mountains is a contributing factor but also the way the corps manages the lake levels.. even in non drought periods you notice a big difference in corps managed lakes and those not managed bu the corps
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Old 04-15-2017, 04:27 PM
 
Location: N. Ga
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadtrip75 View Post
I see. I knew Atlanta had plenty of rain, so I was unaware of the major drought up in the mountains.

I've also been told that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers inexplicably drained 10 feet of the lake last year despite having ample water downstream.
Up here in the mountains, last summer we had an appreciable rain the end of July... it didn't rain any real truly measurable amount again till the end of October. There were places on Lake Nottley that you could literally walk across the whole lake....... We're just now getting back to normal winter depth with several more feet before we're at good summer levels......
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Old 04-15-2017, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Undeveloped Columbia County
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Clark Hill Lake (aka Thurmond Lake) is so low that the floating gas lines and depth markers used to show swimming areas are on the beaches
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Old 04-17-2017, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Woodstock, GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post
You don't erase a drought just with one or two rain events.
Not with one or two typical rain events.

But it has happened in the recent past:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_S..._States_floods

The floods of 2009 brought both Allatoona and Lanier up to flood reserve capacity despite the previous three years of drought.
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