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Old 10-21-2019, 08:32 PM
bu2 bu2 started this thread
 
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https://news.gallup.com/poll/168653/...aces-live.aspx


Gallup poll on how residents feel about their state as a place to live. Georgia is right in the middle at #25. 41% say it is one of the top places to live. Montana and Alaska were tied for #1 at 77%. Rhode Island was last at 18%.

Georgia was a little ahead of Alabama and South Carolina and a little behind Tennessee and Florida. North Carolina was down at #38.
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Old 10-21-2019, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
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Meh
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Old 10-22-2019, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
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I sure wouldn't let a poll like this influence any judgement. Here's how it was conducted in 2013:

"The results are based on a special 50-state Gallup poll conducted June-December 2013, including interviews with at least 600 residents in every state. For the first time, Gallup measured whether residents view their states as "the best possible state to live in," "one of the best possible states to live in," "as good a state as any to live in," or "the worst possible state to live in."

And as for Texas's high ranking- they make state pride an art form. I've lived there. Their extreme pride can be off putting.

Rhode Island, where I live, has many beautiful and very expensive sections. Not the greatest for the middle class. I'm sure that accounts for a certain amount of disgruntlement! And Rhode Islanders will tell it as they see it- they can be blunt.

Parts of Georgia are also gorgeous- I've been there.

And who the heck answers Gallup polls? They call on your phone. Who answers these calls and talks to pollsters??? Not moi.
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Old 10-22-2019, 07:03 AM
 
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Also a lot has changed since 2013. In Georgia and elsewhere.
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Old 11-14-2019, 09:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
Also a lot has changed since 2013. In Georgia and elsewhere.
LIKE what has changed so much since 2013 in terms of the state of the states? I think Georgia's middling ranking is a reflection of it being a bifurcated state, i.e. metro Atlanta and the rest of the state. Texas may benefit from its size, diversity of cities, diversity of economy, unique resources, an international border as well as a unique history from which to shape its future
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Old 11-14-2019, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Ono Island, Orange Beach, AL
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Georgia is a beautiful state. From its cities to its farming communities. From its mountains to its coastal plains. Georgia is conservative, yes. However, it also has a significant liberal population (well, two less since we moved...). Georgians are generally warm, friendly and nice folks. You can get a very good eduction in the state. You have access to many world-class amenities. It offers an energized and exciting city life, yet also offers a bucolic and serene rural life.

Complain all you want about its politics. However, you can complain about that in most every state depending upon your political and social leanings.

I think Georgia is great and am proud to have called it home for over five decades.
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Old 11-15-2019, 06:24 AM
 
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Well. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, and I'm going to be fully honest about how I feel about mine (for both good and bad)

For me specifically after having lived in the following states:

Washington
California
Texas
Illinois

And having seen just about every major city in this country, Georgia is an okay place but I no longer have the desire to live there.

Atlanta to me didnt really feel anything more than an average medium/large city and didnt offer anywhere near enough in terms of amenities, infrastructure, and salaries to keep me interested in staying there. It does have greenery and the lushness is nice but there are other places in this country where that can be had, although I will admit you will probably pay considerably more. They rave about the mountains as well 90% of the metro inhabitants will never see them as they are nearly 70 miles away from the city center. Where Atlanta shines the most is for people moving in from more expensive metros, for them it's a bargain as they can pay cash for a home and have plenty to spare. For people starting off there though, it's much harder because there is still a significant gap between the CoL and starter wages.

This isnt to say Georgia and Atlanta are the only places like this however. Its considerably harder to start off in Washington state and California, New York (and just about any other major metro) for obvious reasons. I just state that the low house costs aren't exactly as much of a bargain unless you're coming from a more expensive metro.

Then there is the infrastructure. Any step taken to remedy the issue in Atlanta was immediately shot down by either politicians or by NIMBY's. Atlanta's biggest problem Atlanta is more so a collection of communities with their own laws, agendas and authority to govern their own piece of the pie, in the end you get no cohesion between the metro and ultimately nothing gets accomplished.

There is no perfect city or state however, if you like its positives enough to stay there then that is quite fine. I just personally never really found anything special enough about it to entice me to stay there.
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Old 11-15-2019, 08:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Need4Camaro View Post
Well. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, and I'm going to be fully honest about how I feel about mine (for both good and bad)

For me specifically after having lived in the following states:

Washington
California
Texas
Illinois

And having seen just about every major city in this country, Georgia is an okay place but I no longer have the desire to live there.

Atlanta to me didnt really feel anything more than an average medium/large city and didnt offer anywhere near enough in terms of amenities, infrastructure, and salaries to keep me interested in staying there. It does have greenery and the lushness is nice but there are other places in this country where that can be had, although I will admit you will probably pay considerably more. They rave about the mountains as well 90% of the metro inhabitants will never see them as they are nearly 70 miles away from the city center. Where Atlanta shines the most is for people moving in from more expensive metros, for them it's a bargain as they can pay cash for a home and have plenty to spare. For people starting off there though, it's much harder because there is still a significant gap between the CoL and starter wages.

This isnt to say Georgia and Atlanta are the only places like this however. Its considerably harder to start off in Washington state and California, New York (and just about any other major metro) for obvious reasons. I just state that the low house costs aren't exactly as much of a bargain unless you're coming from a more expensive metro.

Then there is the infrastructure. Any step taken to remedy the issue in Atlanta was immediately shot down by either politicians or by NIMBY's. Atlanta's biggest problem Atlanta is more so a collection of communities with their own laws, agendas and authority to govern their own piece of the pie, in the end you get no cohesion between the metro and ultimately nothing gets accomplished.

There is no perfect city or state however, if you like its positives enough to stay there then that is quite fine. I just personally never really found anything special enough about it to entice me to stay there.
You've covered a lot of ground in the US and I agree with many of your comments.

I think for many younger and single people Atlanta doesn't have the draw that other cities have, but what I will say is that once you're a bit older, have kids and want the combination of access to a large metro area but still allow your family to have a high quality of life there's a lot there outside the perimeter. In NY/NJ, COL and QOL needs mean many people live 30, 40, 50+ miles away from Manhattan where they work. Even the congested 400 corridor is better than the Long Island Expressway or Northern State at its peak. Or a 2 hour commute on the train each way.

While I love some of Atlanta's neighborhoods I don't have the desire to live in the city (though I love to visit). The Alpharetta area is pretty close to ideal for what my family and I look for on a day-to-day basis. But as I've said before, horses for courses and it's not great for everyone.
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Old 11-18-2019, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Sandy Springs, GA
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I would say that Georgia is pretty meh also. For the most part, its populated areas (which offer more diverse culture and opportunity) don't have much in the way of natural resources, geographical amenities or unique traits or character.

I think being their largest metro being a recent addition to the 'world class' cities list plays a large role, but lots of other states half everything GA has to offer and then some. I'd be open to moving for the right opportunity.
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Old 11-18-2019, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Fayetteville, GA
5 posts, read 1,626 times
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I'm a lifelong GA resident, (40 years) and I'm no longer a fan of Georgia. I have traveled to 21 states, but I know traveling somewhere is not the same as living there. I wished I had left a long time ago, but I kept making excuses to leave. I know there are worse places to live, but as time goes on I despise this state more. My wife and I grew up on the south metro Atlanta area. To us, the quality of life here is not what it used to be. The job market here is stagnant, unless you want to work in a warehouse. The commute to Atlanta is not justifiable for the jobs that are available there. We are fortunate that the population hasn't exploded as much as it did in the northern counties. However, crime and population shifts are a constant worry. In my opinion, the city of Atlanta and the state of Georgia as a whole is divided into two sections, and the I-20 corridor is the dividing point. With some exception, everything south of I-20 is in decline. Hapeville, and some places around Camp Creek are the exception. All the other suburbs have about a 20 year life span before the population pick up and moves south. Also, there's not much in the way of good training after high school either. Unless you plan to go into the healthcare field or repairing conveyor belts in a warehouse, there's not much being taught at any of the local tech schools.

North Georgia used to be nice, but as I said before, it's becoming very crowded. So many people are retiring there now, and hipsters have taken the place over. The locals are pissed about it and intimidate anyone with an out of county or state tag. I used to enjoy taking trip up there, now I avoid it like the plague. In the smaller towns south and east of Atlanta are DYING! I have family in an area North of Augusta, GA. As I travel trough some of the towns to visit them everything is becoming blighted. So many homes are for sale, many of them are vacant. A few years ago, a friend of mine came across a grand old house for sale in Montezuma, GA for $195,000. He couldn't believe the price and thought it was a misprint. I explained to him how Montezuma is not that great of an area hence the low price.
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