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Old 02-26-2009, 10:22 AM
 
969 posts, read 2,658,614 times
Reputation: 429

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewtownMacon View Post
Can you "please" explain how something that will create lots of jobs in this economy NOT good? and why it would not change the way people commute? You are not making any sense.....is it because you don't agree with how its going to funded or do you just disagree with it all together. INSIGHT PLEASE....
I disagree with both aspects...the funding & the practicality.

What are we creating? Competition for the airlines, that it! This does NOTHING for mobility on a local or regional level.

I encourage all of you to you tube an older espisode of "The Simpsons", where a charlatan comes into town & convinces the people of Springfield to build a monorail. That will be the same result as this thing being proposed.
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Old 02-26-2009, 10:36 AM
 
543 posts, read 1,146,466 times
Reputation: 41
I see nothing wrong with competition between airlines and highspeed rail. The airline have gotten out of hand with their prices. This creates jobs people and and has room to build. Maybe Columbus and Augusta get that route later on down the line.
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Old 02-26-2009, 10:41 AM
 
969 posts, read 2,658,614 times
Reputation: 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hot_Mike View Post
I see nothing wrong with competition between airlines and highspeed rail.
Then let private enterprise build it...not the taxpayers!
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Old 02-26-2009, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Port Wentworth (North)
726 posts, read 3,340,139 times
Reputation: 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaflsc View Post
Then let private enterprise build it...not the taxpayers!
Also let private enterprise build roads and airports.
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Old 02-26-2009, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
10,682 posts, read 21,344,877 times
Reputation: 2940
Your status symbol says it all gaflsc. Like I said, take a trip to Europe or Japan sometime. If it can work there then why not here? We already pay taxes and I want my money going to useful things like this.
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Old 02-26-2009, 11:07 AM
 
969 posts, read 2,658,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g-man430 View Post
Your status symbol says it all gaflsc. Like I said, take a trip to Europe or Japan sometime. If it can work there then why not here? We already pay taxes and I want my money going to useful things like this.
I pay taxes too, Sparky. But I don't want mine going towards foolish projects like this.

I've been to Japan & Europe, son. Have you? If so, you can also appreciate that lack of space & migration patterns are the reason they have rail & we don't. The also pay WAY more in taxes too.....but your status symbol tells me you don't mind following their examples in that department either......
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Old 02-26-2009, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,319 posts, read 23,050,903 times
Reputation: 3896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hot_Mike View Post
I see nothing wrong with competition between airlines and highspeed rail. The airline have gotten out of hand with their prices.
How do you come to this conclusion?

Air travel is significantly less expensive now than it was 5, 10, or 20 years ago, and one of the reasons that airlines have had such a terrible time recouping losses due to high fuel prices is because it's very hard for them to raise fares.
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Old 02-26-2009, 02:36 PM
 
969 posts, read 2,658,614 times
Reputation: 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by bgnzsavnh View Post
Also let private enterprise build roads and airports.
I disagree, as they're vital not only for commerce..but also for the defense of the nation. High speed rail doesn't meet that litmus test.
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Old 02-26-2009, 02:37 PM
 
969 posts, read 2,658,614 times
Reputation: 429
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcsteiner View Post
How do you come to this conclusion?

Air travel is significantly less expensive now than it was 5, 10, or 20 years ago, and one of the reasons that airlines have had such a terrible time recouping losses due to high fuel prices is because it's very hard for them to raise fares.

^ 'tis true.
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Old 02-26-2009, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
14,413 posts, read 10,448,085 times
Reputation: 10844
LAW OF PHYSICS REVIEW:
Lowest friction, lowest cost - cheapest transportation: water (slow)
Next lowest friction, moderate cost - steel wheel on steel rail (slow to fast)

Before "cheap and plentiful petroleum" there were boats and railroads. And for good reason.

Rubber tire on pavement is actually a big loser, physics wise. And ultimately unsustainable. Automobiles (even electric / hybrids) depend on petroleum for synthetic rubber tires, plastics, fabrics, lubrication and asphalt pavement. It is the height of folly to consume a resource in 200 years that took over 60 million years to produce. Our descendants will be wroth with us!

All modes of transportation that are dependent upon petroleum will become progressively more expensive - with air travel at greatest risk. (No substitute for jet fuel on the horizon)

MAG LEV does offer higher energy efficiency than steel wheel on steel rail - except that building the infrastructure offsets that efficiency by many orders of magnitude. We should endeavor to make mag lev far cheaper before embarking on any plans to build it.

The best overall compromise is to build high speed RAIL utilizing existing rights of way, and incrementally building true high performance tracks. Which will require electrification (which will reduce diesel consumption) of the mainline tracks.

The FACTS:
USA imports 70% of its petroleum consumption.
If that is stopped, for whatever reason, the nation is crippled. Mechanized farming is affected. Famine is a real possibility. Distribution of goods and services by diesel truck and diesel rail will be cut by 70% or more. More pain and suffering.

OPTIONS:
[] Cut diesel consumption
1. Transfer long haul cargo to rail
2. Electrify mainline railroads
3. Rebuild urban railroads (Streetcars, etc)
4. Add catenary power grid for trolley buses
5. Superinsulate houses to reduce fuel oil consumption (space heating)
[] Cut gasoline consumption
6. See #3,4, for replacements for private automobiles
7. compound gyrocopters for general aviation
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