U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 06-25-2009, 07:09 PM
 
19 posts, read 43,458 times
Reputation: 12

Advertisements

I grew up in the Southeast and regularly visited Atlanta and other parts of Georgia on short trips. As most people know, I-75 is typically 70 MPH with the exception of a few areas where it drops to 55 MPH. However, it appears, that when you enter the state of Georgia, the speed limit changes unexpectedly in many places along the highway (i.e. 70 to 60 to 55 to 65). In some instances, one mile might be 70, suddenly drop to 55, and go back to 70 two miles later. Moreover, there may be only have one posted sign and, if you are in the fast lane on the multi-lane highway cruising through Atlanta, you may not notice (especially if others are whizzing past you in the HOV lane).

Not only is the driving confusing, but GA is nice enough to station a swarm of cops at each speed limit change to take advantage of the confusion. Apparently, they love out-of-state people and, remarked to me (as an out-of-state person who was snared in their speed trap) that I could just mail in my check. I normally would just chalk it up to bad luck and remit the money without worrying too much. But, I found out that the fine is $778!!! Keep in mind -- that is a fine for speeding only for a first-time offender (no tickets in 10 years) with no other issues AND I was very polite to the cop.

Of course, as I thought the speed limit was 70 MPH (which it was two miles earlier), this huge fine is even more frustrating. In heavy Atlanta traffic, you cannot see the change if you are in the pack of cars. The government of Georgia is not above taking money in an economic drought. After all -- in a real drought, they tried to steal Tennessee's water in the Tennessee River by saying that it was in their state boundaries. So, I publish this posting as a warning to anyone going into Georgia (and, specifically, Atlanta). They are looking for your cash to fill their sagging budget. If you must drive through this speed trap, I suggest that you drive in the slow lane and resist the urge to stay with the flow of traffic.

 
Old 06-25-2009, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Margaritaville, State Of mind
275 posts, read 1,207,636 times
Reputation: 174
Please tell me you are going to fight this ticket. Right?
 
Old 06-25-2009, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,862 posts, read 15,313,352 times
Reputation: 3576
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukedaddy View Post
Please tell me you are going to fight this ticket. Right?
On what grounds?

"I wasn't paying attention to the signs"

OR

"they hate out of state people and it's all so unfair"

The OP admitted he was exceeding even the 70 MPH limit. You don't get that kind of fine unless you are WAAAAAY over the limit. I've driven I-75 to Chattanooga several times and never found myself confused or picked on. We live in an excuse society.
 
Old 06-25-2009, 08:59 PM
 
19 posts, read 43,458 times
Reputation: 12
I'm not making excuses. I am responsible for paying the fine and I was the driver of the car. But, anyone accused of something has a fundamental right to defend against it. So, I am providing a DEFENSE against a speeding violation that was slapped on me for exceeding a limit that was not adequately posted in an area with heavy traffic. For those of us not from the area, it is difficult to adjust to a speed limit change when you're in a middle lane and the change was posted only two miles back. If they wanted to legitimately get people who set out to speed, put the cops well after the change has been duly noticed. In the route to Florida, I noticed several speed changes. So, it's easy to find yourself in a reduced zone in the blink of an eye.

I haven't had a ticket in over ten years and, in this case, I feel that it is unwarranted because it was going a few miles over 70 (because I thought the limit was 70!) --- I wasn't going 90 or anything like that! Moreover, the fact that the fine is so high is ridiculous in itself. For me to get any kind of remedy, I have to travel back to Atlanta and fight the ticket. This involves two court hearings -- costing me $100 in gas, 700 miles on my car, maybe 2 days in a hotel, and time off work. So, I may just pay the fine even though I am a lawyer and I believe I have a palatable defense.

My point in posting this situation is to warn visitors that GA imposes some of the HIGHEST fines I've ever seen. If you mistakenly believe the limit is 70 and you go 75 MPH (when it is in fact 55), be prepared to give a large gift to the state of Georgia. I can just imagine that many families might be pushed into dire financial straits with a fine that high! The only entity providing an "excuse" is the state of Georgia and their excuse to take my money is the ruse of calling my actions "speeding" because they decided to station a cop shortly after a speed limit reduction.
 
Old 06-25-2009, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Monroe, Louisiana
887 posts, read 2,724,784 times
Reputation: 539
Good luck! I know how unfair and how stupid speeding laws are!
 
Old 06-25-2009, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,862 posts, read 15,313,352 times
Reputation: 3576
Quote:
Originally Posted by streamvista View Post
I'm not making excuses. I am responsible for paying the fine and I was the driver of the car. But, anyone accused of something has a fundamental right to defend against it. So, I am providing a DEFENSE against a speeding violation that was slapped on me for exceeding a limit that was not adequately posted in an area with heavy traffic. For those of us not from the area, it is difficult to adjust to a speed limit change when you're in a middle lane and the change was posted only two miles back. If they wanted to legitimately get people who set out to speed, put the cops well after the change has been duly noticed.
Well if you think that the signs were not legally posted or the cop pulled you over too close to the speed change, then good luck. Georgia law does provide for a minimum distance from a speed limit reduction before you can be pulled over. I believe it's 600 feet.

There are also statutes that cover signs, road construction, and work zones. Check Title 40 of the OCGA at Lexis-Nexis and maybe you can make your case if you take some photos and try to prove facts backed by law.

LexisNexis® Custom Solution: Georgia Code Research Tool
 
Old 06-25-2009, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,862 posts, read 15,313,352 times
Reputation: 3576
Quote:
Originally Posted by LSU Tiger Z71 View Post
Good luck! I know how unfair and how stupid speeding laws are!
Yeah, how unfair to actually pull you over when you're exceeding the limit.

Actually, Georgia has some of the most fair laws in the US. They cover speeding and what the cops can and can't do to prevent speed traps and unethical situations. Georgia prohibits unmarked vehicles, includes minimum visibility laws, includes laws that prevent cops from taking radar and laser on hills, and other protections. In many other states, the cops can hide with lights off around bends, downhills, and behind trees in unmarked vehicles and it's legal. Not so in Georgia.
 
Old 06-25-2009, 09:24 PM
 
Location: North Georgia
263 posts, read 722,641 times
Reputation: 136
Super Speeder Law Passes
By Condace Pressley @ March 25, 2009 4:06 PM Permalink | Comments (20) | TrackBacks (0)
(WSB Radio State Capitol Bureau) A bill to impose super fines on super speeders is headed to the Governor Perdue's desk.

The measure, which Perdue has pushed for three years, would charge an additional $200 in fines to those caught going 75 mph on two-lane roads and 85 mph and over on four lane ones.

The measure received final passage in the State Senate where Sen. Bill Heath (R-Bremen) says Georgia has a reputation for speeders on its roads.

"Georgia is known as a place where you can make up time when you're traveling to and from Florida for example. As you travel through Georgia you can pick the speed up a little bit and get by with it," he says.

Heath says some $23 million a year is expected to be generated from the increase in fine with all the money slated to go to fund Georgia's trauma care network.

25 March 2009

Each year, traffic crashes on Georgia’s roadways cause more than 1,600 fatalities, about a quarter of them caused by excessive speeds, state officials report. The accidents have placed a strain on Georgia’s trauma centers.

Beginning July 1, the law also hikes driver’s license reinstatement fees for Georgians with repeat speeding offenses.

Georgia’s trauma centers have been struggling for years with a chronic cash shortage. A 2007 legislative study committee concluded the state’s trauma network is in crisis. The committee found that the death rate in Georgia from traumatic injury is far greater than the national rate.

Last edited by CalieCat; 06-25-2009 at 09:41 PM.. Reason: Adding extra information
 
Old 06-25-2009, 09:37 PM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
9,188 posts, read 30,938,919 times
Reputation: 5171
Quote:
Originally Posted by streamvista View Post

Of course, as I thought the speed limit was 70 MPH (which it was two miles earlier), this huge fine is even more frustrating. In heavy Atlanta traffic, you cannot see the change if you are in the pack of cars.
The judge will say this (I know because I know someone who said the exact same thing you said above)...

"If you were at the recommended safe distance behind the cars in front of you, you could easily have seen the posted speed limit signs".

Same thing happened to someone I know. They do admit however, to driving closer to those in front of them than you should, with the usual excuse of "everyone else does it". Still, even though you didn't state your distance from each car in this "pack" you were in, the closer you are to cars in front of you, the less likely you are to see signs, and that's exactly what they said to her in court. It's extremely easy for them to say you were following too closely to see the signs too, as the last time they showed cars from an overpass traveling along I-285, the guy said not even 1% of them were following back far enough to be safe, avoid a pileup, or see obstructions in the road ahead of them. So using those stats, the court will assume you were also following too close to see the signs. I have no idea what her fine was though or where exactly it happened, etc.
 
Old 06-26-2009, 04:21 AM
 
19 posts, read 43,458 times
Reputation: 12
I understand some of the points made. As to following too close, I don't think that I was. The issue was that there were cars in the lanes beside of me, blocking my vision to the side of the road.

My point in posting this is not really to adjudicate my case online and gain a sympathy verdict. I just wanted people to know that GA is vigilant about pulling people over and slapping them with a $778 ticket. Moreover, one cannot do an online traffic course or other way of easily reducing the fine -- absent going to court. So, for people traveling through the state, you have to be especially careful to avoid missing a speed limit sign showing a change.

As far as Georgia supposedly being one of the best states in the country for speeding laws . . . laws on the books do NOT equate to fairness in application. For people to show that the cops are not following the law, they'd have to go to court and, as one poster (or, should I say, law enforcement professional?) characterized it, "make excuses." I simply do not have time to prepare for a trial on a traffic ticket and, I suspect, most other working people do not either.

Also, from what I see from briefly looking online and as a licensed GA attorney (although I've never really used my GA bar since I practice in another state), GA has not reached some sort of panacea with respect to speeding laws. In fact, its just fine to have ticket quotas in GA.
Georgia: Speed Trap Caught Using Ticket Quotas
Georgia Speed Trap Brings Huge Profit
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Georgia
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top