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Old 05-29-2010, 04:31 PM
 
10 posts, read 25,618 times
Reputation: 15

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Atlanta- People here use cars like handicapped wheel chairs instead of relying on their legs for travel. With public transportation, they are still required to walk blocks to reach a bus stop or so. In New York, the blind are still able to function and more services are provided to those who are handicapped, unlike Georgia. Here you have to depend on someone to take you everywhere, your life depends on a chauffeur.

Children are just some out of many that are victims of Suburban Sprawl

-- DO NOT LET YOUR Child JOIN the Most Dangerous Gang in America

The result is a new phenomenon: the "cul-de-sac kid," the child who lives as a prisoner of a thoroughly safe and unchallenging environment. Dependent always on some adult to drive them around, children and adolescents are unable to practice at becoming adults. They cannot run so simple a household errand as picking up a carton of milk. They cannot bicycle to the toy store and spend their money on their own. Most cannot walk to school. Even pickup baseball games are a thing of the past, with parents now required to arrange car-pooling with military precision, to transport children at the appointed times. Children are frozen in a form of infancy, utterly dependent on others, beret of the ability to introduce variety into their own lives, robbed of the opportunity to make choices and exercise judgment.

It seems odd to say that the suburbs are dangerous, since many families relocate to suburbia precisely to find a safer environment. In terms of crime, this motivation seems justified, but suburbs are hardly free from violent crime, and recent examples of suburban gang activity call the assumption into question. But there is more to protecting life than avoiding crime, as any parent of a sixteen-year-old driver will attest. Far and away, car crashes are the largest killer of American teenagers, accounting for more than one third of all deaths. Yet all the suburban parents who can afford it will readily buy the additional cars that provide independence for their children, often in order to regain their own freedom.

When they get behind the wheel, teenagers automatically join the most dangerous gang in America. A child is twenty times more likely to die from an automobile mishap than from gang activity, as most young drivers are involved in at least one serious auto accident between ages sixteen and twenty.
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Old 05-29-2010, 05:02 PM
 
Location: NE Atlanta suburbs
472 posts, read 770,051 times
Reputation: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by prelatic View Post



Atlanta- People here use cars like handicapped wheel chairs instead of relying on their legs for travel. With public transportation, they are still required to walk blocks to reach a bus stop or so. In New York, the blind are still able to function and more services are provided to those who are handicapped, unlike Georgia. Here you have to depend on someone to take you everywhere, your life depends on a chauffeur.

Children are just some out of many that are victims of Suburban Sprawl

-- DO NOT LET YOUR Child JOIN the Most Dangerous Gang in America

The result is a new phenomenon: the "cul-de-sac kid," the child who lives as a prisoner of a thoroughly safe and unchallenging environment. Dependent always on some adult to drive them around, children and adolescents are unable to practice at becoming adults. They cannot run so simple a household errand as picking up a carton of milk. They cannot bicycle to the toy store and spend their money on their own. Most cannot walk to school. Even pickup baseball games are a thing of the past, with parents now required to arrange car-pooling with military precision, to transport children at the appointed times. Children are frozen in a form of infancy, utterly dependent on others, beret of the ability to introduce variety into their own lives, robbed of the opportunity to make choices and exercise judgment.

It seems odd to say that the suburbs are dangerous, since many families relocate to suburbia precisely to find a safer environment. In terms of crime, this motivation seems justified, but suburbs are hardly free from violent crime, and recent examples of suburban gang activity call the assumption into question. But there is more to protecting life than avoiding crime, as any parent of a sixteen-year-old driver will attest. Far and away, car crashes are the largest killer of American teenagers, accounting for more than one third of all deaths. Yet all the suburban parents who can afford it will readily buy the additional cars that provide independence for their children, often in order to regain their own freedom.

When they get behind the wheel, teenagers automatically join the most dangerous gang in America. A child is twenty times more likely to die from an automobile mishap than from gang activity, as most young drivers are involved in at least one serious auto accident between ages sixteen and twenty.

I wouldn't let my kids do these things even if they *were* in walking distance. Things are not like they were 20-30 years ago when it was safe for a kid to go to the store on their own. Too many sickos in this world now.

Most people enjoy the suburbs because they typically are family oriented, so I don't see families flocking to the cities en masse.
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Old 05-29-2010, 05:21 PM
 
118 posts, read 334,874 times
Reputation: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcm2010 View Post
I wouldn't let my kids do these things even if they *were* in walking distance. Things are not like they were 20-30 years ago when it was safe for a kid to go to the store on their own. Too many sickos in this world now.
^ That might be the problem.
Parents not allowing there kids to walk down the street and buy a pack of gum.
We really can't blame the kids for staying inside. That starts with the parents.
I doubt there are actually more sickos today than at anytime in the past. We're just able to catch them (DNA, internet tracking, etc.), and we like hearing negative stuff on the news.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcm2010 View Post
Most people enjoy the suburbs because they typically are family oriented, so I don't see families flocking to the cities en masse.
Again, this problem lays with adults. If you do some research there are PLENTY of young, white, educated professionals moving to inner cities now. That is the trend of the current generation.
The kids were sheltered and hated it. Life was boring. They also see how inefficient it is to live 30 minutes from work. Crime is starting to flood cheaper suburbs. People flocked to suburbs years ago. Not anymore.
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Old 05-29-2010, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
4,444 posts, read 4,846,557 times
Reputation: 3358
Great post, and what an awesome vid, thank you for posting this on City-Data for us.

As a former urban planner, I'm well aware of the issue of sprawl, and the moniker "Sprawlanta" is unfortunately an accurate description of the Atlanta metro area. But projects such as Glenwood and the Beltline project do provide a few rays of hope that things are turning around for this city. Also, due to the extreme nature of sprawl in this area, there is a backlash of sorts - just check the Census data for how the city (the actual city, I mean) has grown over the past decade or so, and more recently, the actual abandonment of the outermost "exurbs" due to the housing depression. Not to mention the great Gas Shortage of 2008, when this city pretty much ran out of gas for a few days in Sept of that year - at which point people realized that they couldn't take unlimited car travel for granted, which I feel left a real mark on how folks feel about their cars and where people want to live in relation to where they work, etc.

As for the suburbs and "snout houses" go, I just think we need to go back to how people lived 40 or 50 years ago - yes, they had single family homes with front yard / back yard, but it was arranged on a more human scale, with stores and the like within easy biking distance, much like how it was when I was growing up. My parents thought nothing of sending me on an emergency errand to the corner store on my bike to fetch a needed ingredient for that night's dinner...hehe. And I do feel that parents today are way, way over-protective of their kids - seeing parents waiting with their kids at the bus stops just makes me shake my head in despair - that'd been unthinkable back in the 70's. Yes, there are crazies out there, but it's ALWAYS been that way - we're just a lot more hypersensitive about it these days. Parents not letting their 12-year olds out on their own on their bikes (and I was riding all the way to downtown of my mid-sized city at the tender age of 12 ) really leads to problems later on, I think. How else are kids supposed to grow up and be independent, if they don't get to "practice" first? If I was a kid growing up now in Sprawlanta, I'd be a total wreck as an adult, no question.

Anyhow, I hope to see a lot of discussion on this thread, so no holding back on this one - I hope!
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Old 05-29-2010, 08:43 PM
 
Location: NE Atlanta suburbs
472 posts, read 770,051 times
Reputation: 214
Quote:
Originally Posted by montyburns View Post
^ That might be the problem.
Parents not allowing there kids to walk down the street and buy a pack of gum.
We really can't blame the kids for staying inside. That starts with the parents.
I doubt there are actually more sickos today than at anytime in the past. We're just able to catch them (DNA, internet tracking, etc.), and we like hearing negative stuff on the news.



Again, this problem lays with adults. If you do some research there are PLENTY of young, white, educated professionals moving to inner cities now. That is the trend of the current generation.
The kids were sheltered and hated it. Life was boring. They also see how inefficient it is to live 30 minutes from work. Crime is starting to flood cheaper suburbs. People flocked to suburbs years ago. Not anymore.

First off, I have no problem. I love my lifestyle in the suburbs, and guess what? So do my kids it is my job as a parent to shelter my kids to a certain point.

Secondly, why on earth would I even want to move to a concrete jungle of an inner city with no yard or families around for my kids to hang out with. When those young adults you speak of start to have children, do you think they will remain in the inner cities for long? I think not.

And then of course you have other factors, air quality and if you love to be outdoors, I hardly think the inner city is the place for you.

I don't think families will stop flocking to the suburbs anytime soon.

There is no way you can compare the loons out there today with what was around when us 30 somethings were growing up. I used to get to ride my back all over my hood until dark, go to the store by myself, and all that. I wouldn't let my kids do that now (my oldest is 11). Are you serious?!

Just my two cents, you can keep the change.
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Old 05-29-2010, 10:30 PM
 
4,469 posts, read 4,689,081 times
Reputation: 3582
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcm2010 View Post
First off, I have no problem. I love my lifestyle in the suburbs, and guess what? So do my kids it is my job as a parent to shelter my kids to a certain point.

Secondly, why on earth would I even want to move to a concrete jungle of an inner city with no yard or families around for my kids to hang out with. When those young adults you speak of start to have children, do you think they will remain in the inner cities for long? I think not.

And then of course you have other factors, air quality and if you love to be outdoors, I hardly think the inner city is the place for you.

I don't think families will stop flocking to the suburbs anytime soon.

There is no way you can compare the loons out there today with what was around when us 30 somethings were growing up. I used to get to ride my back all over my hood until dark, go to the store by myself, and all that. I wouldn't let my kids do that now (my oldest is 11). Are you serious?!

Just my two cents, you can keep the change.
ok but sprawl is a example of a Social trap

it does this


YouTube - ARC's Lifelong Communities Charrette - 7:00 Overview

Actually the air quality in the suburbs are just as bad. for one people drive more. Cities don't have big yards right, they have bigger park and this is georgia it's green even in the cities. just saying
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Old 05-30-2010, 03:08 AM
 
573 posts, read 1,801,423 times
Reputation: 315
[

Last edited by Hypnosis; 05-30-2010 at 03:21 AM..
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Old 05-30-2010, 03:20 AM
 
573 posts, read 1,801,423 times
Reputation: 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
ok but sprawl is a example of a Social trap

it does this


YouTube - ARC's Lifelong Communities Charrette - 7:00 Overview

Actually the air quality in the suburbs are just as bad. for one people drive more. Cities don't have big yards right, they have bigger park and this is georgia it's green even in the cities. just saying

Yes this is true
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Old 05-30-2010, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Here and there
1,808 posts, read 3,700,307 times
Reputation: 2021
Quote:
Originally Posted by montyburns View Post
^ That might be the problem.
Parents not allowing there kids to walk down the street and buy a pack of gum.
Bingo. The proverbial nail on the head. The (and these are not my words but the title of an episode of Real Sports w/ Bryant Gumble,) Wussification of America.

And here it is, as clear as day....

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcm2010 View Post
it is my job as a parent to shelter my kids...

These are our future leaders. The sheltered, no losers, everyone gets a trophy, helmet wearing, knee and elbow padded next generation. God help us all.
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Old 05-30-2010, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
4,444 posts, read 4,846,557 times
Reputation: 3358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldawgfan View Post
These are our future leaders. The sheltered, no losers, everyone gets a trophy, helmet wearing, knee and elbow padded next generation. God help us all.
Indeed.

Let's see, when I was a kid back in the 70's, I did things such as climbing trees, riding my bike hither and yon, got my feet wet in the creek, looking for crayfish, I played hide-and-seek for hours on end "just be back home for supper!", and that was just the summer vacation kind of stuff. In the spring and fall, I played soccer, and nope, we didn't get trophies for losing, or winning for that matter...lol. But the feeling you got when the ball kissed the net behind the goal - ahhh - that's the stuff childhood memories are made of.

In the winter, when it snowed (this was before global warming, ha ha) we'd go sledding down our street, all day long - what a blast! Sure, we got the occasional scrape and bruise, but that's what moms were for, with a hot cup of cocoa to warm the stomach once we finally came in from the cold. And when we were a bit older, there was easy money to be made shoveling snow for the old ladies - have shovel, will travel...lol.

Yeah, I'll take growing up in the 70's and early 80's anytime - you can keep your overprotective, stifling 21st century method of child-rearing, thank you very much.
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