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Old 06-17-2007, 07:38 PM
 
7 posts, read 34,016 times
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Could anyone give me an idea of how much my electric bill will be if my house is complete electric; the heat is from electricity, so i wouldn't have a gas bill. I would like to have an idea how much my monthly electric bill will be like for the summer months and for the winter months.The house will just be occupied by myself.
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Old 06-17-2007, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Monroe,Ga.
183 posts, read 935,064 times
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We have 2300 sq. ft. and our electric bill in the winter runs about 180.00, in the winter, the summer, we have a pool and freezer and exta fridge in the garage, about 300.00 month. We have a heat pump. Hope this helps you!
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Old 06-17-2007, 09:47 PM
 
Location: The Great City of Macon
511 posts, read 2,316,748 times
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You do understand when power goes out there is a huge hassle, to keep warm in the winter monts, and to keep cool, in the summer months, due to power outages and your house being fully eletric, I do understand the price may seem cheaper, because of the rising gas prices, but here in Georgia, gas is onw of the cheapest in the nation. To consider doing this now could cost you, but in the long run it is a great decision
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Old 06-18-2007, 06:05 AM
 
1,418 posts, read 9,511,871 times
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Also, when it gets really cold out (below 30) heat pumps really don't work. So, if you are going to go with electric heat, it has to be the old kind - basically heating elements, and this uses a lot of wattage.
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Old 06-18-2007, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Sunny Florida
7,136 posts, read 11,311,763 times
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I wouldn't go with electric heat because it's hard to get warm with electric heat. I can't explain the science behind it, but everyone I know with electric heat complains about feeling cold even when they jack up the thermostat, me included. I've had houses with radiators, oil heat, a woodstove, electric heat, and gas heat and I will never again have electric heat because I was always cold. Plus, as stated above, when the power goes out you are totally screwed unless you have a backup system.
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Old 06-18-2007, 05:44 PM
 
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Thanks for all your valuable information. The house comes fully electric,I ddin't have a choice really.
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Old 06-18-2007, 05:54 PM
 
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My question goes to Rasmon. How many people are there in your household?I'm just by myself.
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Old 06-18-2007, 09:28 PM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
9,188 posts, read 30,798,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by movingtohenry View Post
Thanks for all your valuable information. The house comes fully electric,I ddin't have a choice really.

If this is a house you're BUYING, then consider a few things....

If you have the money, a full-house backup generator can automatically kick in when the power goes out and power your fridge, heat/air, etc. A full-house version runs from about $3,500 to $5,000 installed which you add fuel yourself. For an extra $1,200 or abouts, they can install an underground propane tank that directly feeds into the generator and will allow it to run for up to 10 continuous days. These may not be day-to-day necessities, but in the burbs after a bad storm, ice storm, or hurricane passes through and you go without power for 2-4 days, they sure do come in handy. As a cheap alternative, for around $600 you can get one that will run the fridge and some fans via an extension cord (keep it outside).

If the house has fireplaces, have them inspected before use. Once they're ok'd, stock up on wood in case you lose power in the winter. Some folks even invest in a few solar panels on the roof for a hot water solar tank and all, too.

All eletric homes sound convenient due to the fact you have fewer bills, but they really are a pain in the butt if the power goes out, so it's good to have some of these backups in place in case it does.

P.S. Electric bills are going to vary WIDELY depending on the insulation, how good the windows are, even the placement of the home on the lot. All of the homes in the neighborhood I live in are basically the same floorplan and size, but they are gas and electric. Still, my electric bill in the summer runs around $150 while next door they rack up $250 or more. Mine is less because I don't leave the windows up or doors open, I use ceiling fans to circulate the A/C. better, and I use florescent bulbs.
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Old 06-19-2007, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Port Wentworth (North)
726 posts, read 3,339,192 times
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Ga Power once ran advertisements for total electric homes. Then came the1974 IceStorm in Atlanta. Every on with their total electric home had to move in with someone with gas heat for a week or more. Have never seen those ads again
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Old 06-19-2007, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Monroe,Ga.
183 posts, read 935,064 times
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There are 3 of us. Tvs are on all the time! My son has his space in the basement, lights are always on! I have not had the problems that have been mentioned here. When our power goes out it is only momentarily. I find that with my thermostat set at 72 in winter, it's plenty warm...and that runs $180-$200 month. In the summer the bill is higher, however, we have alot of things running in the summer. The pool filter, an extra fridge for drinks. We had gas heat in my other house in Lawrenceville...the pilot light blew out from time to time. I guess there are problems or downsides to everything. But like I said, we have no problem with an all electric house. Good luck!
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