U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Great Debates
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-23-2008, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Beautiful East TN!!
7,281 posts, read 19,578,591 times
Reputation: 2761

Advertisements

I tried to discuss this in the politics forum but not one response so I thought I would try it here in the great debates forum. I am hoping for some insightful responses to see if my hypothesis holds any water at all.
This thought started do to another thread which I have referenced.

This is a very interesting thread. It made me think about what is working in what states when it comes to state economies compared to majority political leanings in that state...are there any connections between the two?
momonkey in this thread://www.city-data.com/forum/2008-...n-style-2.html has shown that blue Michigan is having major issues.
The only other state I have as a comparison is TN, where I live. It also has priorly had a high unemployment rate. Well, it really always has because it is a farming state and the unemployment rates do not include farms and it's workers in it's numbers so not really sure how accurate those numbers are for TN, KY, Iowa and such states, but I digress.

Here are some interesting facts about TN in regards to unemployment and it's current economy.
In August 08 TN was listed as having 6.6% unemployment rate: http://www.epi.org/content.cfm/webfe...shots_20080924

Yet Volkswagen has chosen Chattanooga TN as the state to move their new plant too this year: http://www.chattanoogan.com/articles/article_131480.asp

Ika has chosen Dandridge TN just recently as the place to move their new plant:
http://www.wate.com/global/story.asp?s=9035602

Kingsport TN has been written up in the WSJ as one of the few areas that are seeing economic growth due to it's ability to export product, this was written in September, after the UE rates were calculated and published above: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB122108254548620951.html

Same city is showing this month sales tax revenue increase: http://www.timesnews.net/article.php?id=9008646

TN is one of the states that did not see a housing bubble and the majority of TN cities and towns continue to see housing value growth, slow but still growth.

So even though the August U.E. rates show high for this state, other info sources show that there is economic growth in the state. It is a primarily red state as far as government and voting trends go.

What about your state? (this question is to everyone reading this) does your state show a connection to it's politics and it's local economy?

Please show links to validate your opinion on your local economy.

This might be very interesting to see, thanks in advance to all those who wish to participate.

Last edited by mbmouse; 10-23-2008 at 07:27 AM.. Reason: correct links
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-23-2008, 08:39 AM
 
5,273 posts, read 13,035,040 times
Reputation: 5817
In Oregon it does.

We went from a blue collar, conservative, lumber & farming state to a white collar, liberal, service oriented economy. The transition was deeply painful for hundreds of thousands of Oregonians, but now that it's been made I suppose we're back on an even keel.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2008, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Washington DC
5,915 posts, read 7,473,324 times
Reputation: 948
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbmouse View Post
I tried to discuss this in the politics forum but not one response so I thought I would try it here in the great debates forum. I am hoping for some insightful responses to see if my hypothesis holds any water at all.
This thought started do to another thread which I have referenced.

This is a very interesting thread. It made me think about what is working in what states when it comes to state economies compared to majority political leanings in that state...are there any connections between the two?
momonkey in this thread://www.city-data.com/forum/2008-...n-style-2.html has shown that blue Michigan is having major issues.
The only other state I have as a comparison is TN, where I live. It also has priorly had a high unemployment rate. Well, it really always has because it is a farming state and the unemployment rates do not include farms and it's workers in it's numbers so not really sure how accurate those numbers are for TN, KY, Iowa and such states, but I digress.

Here are some interesting facts about TN in regards to unemployment and it's current economy.
In August 08 TN was listed as having 6.6% unemployment rate: The unemployment trend by state

Yet Volkswagen has chosen Chattanooga TN as the state to move their new plant too this year: 7/15/2008 - Chattanooga Chosen For $1 Billion Volkswagen Plant - Breaking News - Chattanoogan.com

Ika has chosen Dandridge TN just recently as the place to move their new plant:
Furniture supplier for Ikea building factory in Dandridge

Kingsport TN has been written up in the WSJ as one of the few areas that are seeing economic growth due to it's ability to export product, this was written in September, after the UE rates were calculated and published above: Exports Prop Up Local Economies - WSJ.com

Same city is showing this month sales tax revenue increase: Sullivan County sales tax revenues increase 7 percent

TN is one of the states that did not see a housing bubble and the majority of TN cities and towns continue to see housing value growth, slow but still growth.

So even though the August U.E. rates show high for this state, other info sources show that there is economic growth in the state. It is a primarily red state as far as government and voting trends go.

What about your state? (this question is to everyone reading this) does your state show a connection to it's politics and it's local economy?

Please show links to validate your opinion on your local economy.

This might be very interesting to see, thanks in advance to all those who wish to participate.
It would seem that per capita GDP would be a good measure:

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2008, 12:58 PM
 
48,508 posts, read 87,684,844 times
Reputation: 18132
Texas certainly went from bue sate to a red stae but I realy doubt that it makes much differencve excpt that it is more open to business now, But this is the case with many staes that are blue and really has moire to do with local politics.But ion the above income has to be tied too cost of living and the state and local governmentt heath in budgets for instance.Many staes are in real financial troubles which bodes poorly for the future.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2008, 03:35 PM
 
878 posts, read 1,935,929 times
Reputation: 463
While I do generally despise Granholm's actions in Michigan, the blame for their current economic woes can't be laid completely at her feet.

The failures of the Big 3 in Michigan to negotiate with unions is generally what started the downward trend in Michigan. A great many industries, both service and manufacturing, depended heavily on these companies providing jobs. Even the most brilliant governor over the last 15 or so years could not have stopped the recession in Michigan.

But its the actions after the downturn where the blame can be laid. Granholm and the Democrats' (and some Republicans too) anti-business regulations and taxes led to many companies passing over the state when looking to build new places of employment. Excessive spending and refusing to repeal some of the more generous social programs (yes, a Republican governor put quite a few into place himself) has turned a moderate crisis into a major one.

These policies might have been acceptable and less destructive in a thriving economy, but in Michigan they seriously hindered any chance at recovery.

Anyway, that's why I left.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2008, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Earth. For now.
1,280 posts, read 1,880,727 times
Reputation: 1492
This is an interesting question. With Minnesota, at least, the fact that it is a solidly "blue" state has, for the last 50 years, gone hand-in-hand with it's economic success, although with a huge caveat...

Minnesotans support social liberalism and economic conservatism. The result is that Minnesota tends to elect candidates for local government (not talking about senators or congress) from both parties who are centrist. That's why Minnesota has often had Republican governors while solidly favoring Democrats for President. (Minnesota hasn't gone "red" since the 1970's.)

The fact that Minnesota is generally a high-tax state gives conservatives pause because it it also a highly successful, well-educated and wealthy state. It is the home of more Fortune 500 & Fortune 1000 Companies than any other state except New York, Illinois, California and Texas. The high taxes, while decried by conservatives, has bought the state an educated workforce and perennially high marks for quality-of-life issues.

It's arguable that Minnesota's most popular governor in recent memory was Arne Carlson - a Republican - who has often denounced his own party as extremist. I am a staunch Democrat. But if Carlson were ever to run again for governor, I would probably vote for him, depending on the policies of his competitor.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2008, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Beautiful East TN!!
7,281 posts, read 19,578,591 times
Reputation: 2761
Hmmm, so far very interesting. Thank you all for participating, I hope more from other states chime in as well.

Astron, that might be the key? See TN has almost always voted Republican in presidential elections but has a total mix in state positions, right now Gov. Bredeson is Dem and doing some great things for the state, including revamping the state medical system to something MUCH better than the previous plan which I believe forced a lot of folks off the "System" and back to work where they should have been in the first place.

Could bipartisanship within the states be the key to good state economies? Or could it have nothing to do with politics and it is a diversifying of product being produced in each state?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2008, 05:44 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 7,949,320 times
Reputation: 829
mouse, I see it as the other way for the most part. Generally, a state's economic politics determine if new corporations will locate there. (This leads to states passing corporations around like a football, but I digress.) This is why Mich. doesn't have the jobs; but it also creates an environment where states undermine each other. The jobs that Michigan has left pay much better than a similar job in Tennessee. The economic competition between states creates a race to the bottom that creates a low-wage situation for places like the sun belt. I don't see that as a good situation in the long run.
I think Minnesota is proven to be the best model by which to attract businesses. Taxes are high, but it produces one of the most well educated populations in the country. Money spent at the University of Minnesota has produced seatbelts, artificial organs and a pacemaker industry that has yielded a Fortune 500 companie. We didn't need to take those jobs from somebody else, we created them from nothing. It creates a system where many more children have equal access to education and creates a social foundation that a stable society relies upon.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2008, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Southeast
4,296 posts, read 6,478,488 times
Reputation: 1446
A lot of deeply Republican areas are experiencing a lot of economic growth, Georgia, the Carolinas, Alabama, etc. all come to mind. Most foreign companies look at the South/Sunbelt first and foremost, which has a notorious reputation for ideal business/industry environments. It's no wonder they continue to vote for the GOP, since they have done better in these past 8-10 years than ever before.

Georgia picked up Kia, Alabama got Hyundai, Mercedes, and others. Mississippi landed Toyota. You rarely hear about these kinds of industries locating in the Northeast or West.

The fact that the South has been minimally hit by the economic turmoil and the housing crisis should be a clear indication of how well the state politics are doing. Sadly, some of these prosporous states are probably going to go Blue, which could make places like North Carolina or Georgia the next Michigan.

Of course, there is direction corellation that Blue states support the service industry and Red states support manufacturing. There isn't really any other way to go, and the transition is usually rough going from industrial jobs to purely service industry.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2008, 06:29 PM
 
Location: hinesburg, vt
1,574 posts, read 4,531,023 times
Reputation: 400
An excellent question! Here in Vermont our economic policies which are directly linked to the ruling leftist legislature has been and will continue to be an absolute disaster. When things don't work out, money being freely spent on questionable programs. the tax burden continuously being increased, then the response seems to always fall along the rationale as "unintended consequences." I know our local politicos are desperatley waiting for Obama under the belief that social spending money from Washington will flow at an increased rate into the state coffers.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Great Debates
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:34 AM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top