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Old 04-03-2009, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 87,022,277 times
Reputation: 36644

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Here's something I just stumbled across, that is not directly related to this topic, but might set aside some myths.

Monroe, Louisiana, is an interesting place. Monroe ranks first in the nation in percentage of households where only
English is spoken. Monroe also ranks first in the nation in percentage of households that are below the poverty line. Monroe (Ouachita Parish) also ranks third in the nation in the smallest number of people who have had an alcoholic drink in the past 30 days. This leads me to believe that immigrants do not make a community poor, and poor people are not the most frequent drinkers. Which might surprise a lot of people.
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Old 04-03-2009, 02:38 PM
 
30,898 posts, read 36,980,033 times
Reputation: 34536
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Where are those charitable dollars going to come from? You? And just how much are you willing to pony up to feed the low-income children in your neighborhood once their benefits end? What if enough people don't volunteer to donate? Who's going to say where exactly the money goes for? Are you aware that your voluntary contribution also is going to have to pay the salaries of the people who administer the charity?
Actually, I donate 10% of my after tax income to charity. If we all paid lower taxes, we could all do that...and it would be cheaper in the long run than government funded programs because private charities are run more cost effectively than government welfare programs. They're also more effective at getting people off the dole (or preventing them from being on the dole in the first place).
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Old 04-03-2009, 02:47 PM
 
30,898 posts, read 36,980,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
I like your point of view LOL. But I do have one thing to add. You can live well on less but most people do not choose to do it.
Thanks. I was going to say the same thing. I live in a high cost area and rented rooms from ages 26 to 35. Then I upgraded to a studio apartment. I drove my used Ford Escort until it wasn't worth fixing, then I bought another 4 year old used economy car with cash, which I still drive (It's now 12 years old). And even at that, I did spend some money on 3 trips to South America as well as other trips in the US. I did go out to eat somewhat often, etc...so it wasn't as if I lived a completely spartan existence.

I got out of 14K in debt and accumulated 100K in net worth over that time period. During that time, I made between 27K and 48K per year. Not a luxury income, especially in the high cost area where I live.

But most people simply refuse to live the way I lived then or even my currently upgraded lifestyle now. They want a new car, and they want a giant SUV at that. They want at least a 1BR apartment. And the craziest people went out and tried to buy 300K condos on 50K in income and then went bust.
Americans have unrealistic expectations. That is the root of our problem. We notice the greed and short sightedness of those on Wall Street, but we don't notice it in ourselves.
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Old 04-03-2009, 02:47 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,784 posts, read 24,099,661 times
Reputation: 27092
well let us face it some people will always make welfare a way of life and there aint no doubting that .
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Old 04-03-2009, 02:48 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,784 posts, read 24,099,661 times
Reputation: 27092
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Thanks. I was going to say the same thing. I live in a high cost area and rented rooms from ages 26 to 35. I drove my used Ford Escort until it wasn't worth fixing, then I bought another 4 year old used economy car with cash.

I got out of 14K in debt and accumulated 100K in net worth over that time period. During that time, I made between 27K and 48K per year. Not a luxury income, especially in the high cost area where I live.

But most people simply refuse to live the way I lived. And even at that, I did spend some money on 3 trips to South America as well as other trips in the US...so it wasn't as if I lived a completely spartan existence.

Americans have unrealistic expectations. That is the root of our problem. We notice the greed and short sightedness of those on Wall Street, but we don't notice it in ourselves.
I could not agree more most americans live beyond their means .
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Old 04-04-2009, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Charleston, WV
3,106 posts, read 7,378,115 times
Reputation: 845
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
But most people simply refuse to live the way I lived then or even my currently upgraded lifestyle now. They want a new car, and they want a giant SUV at that. They want at least a 1BR apartment. And the craziest people went out and tried to buy 300K condos on 50K in income and then went bust.
Americans have unrealistic expectations. That is the root of our problem. We notice the greed and short sightedness of those on Wall Street, but we don't notice it in ourselves.
You said it. We are so quick to point fingers and blame everyone but ourselves.
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Old 04-04-2009, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Charleston, WV
3,106 posts, read 7,378,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliffie View Post
But you have to catch them at it first. What frosts my .... is the way so many people who are not disabled -- or no longer disabled -- still get disability without anyone taking them off their benefits.
Several years ago I took classes to get an insurance license. The instructor told us about her son who years before was in a car accident, got SSI (or SS whichever it is) and was still getting it at the time of class. She was bragging about how they were able to work the system. I was disgusted.
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Old 04-04-2009, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
7,085 posts, read 12,060,763 times
Reputation: 4125
Quote:
Originally Posted by vec101 View Post
Several years ago I took classes to get an insurance license. The instructor told us about her son who years before was in a car accident, got SSI (or SS whichever it is) and was still getting it at the time of class. She was bragging about how they were able to work the system. I was disgusted.
Same here, a guy was getting his masters for free while working and drawing governmental disability payments from getting hurt at his last job. I congratulated him on being an outright total bastard, and I was jealous he was able to do it.
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Old 04-04-2009, 05:51 PM
 
420 posts, read 1,194,301 times
Reputation: 207
Drug tests for welfare recipients. Mandated time constraints to be on welfare until it ends. Right to work state rules in all states. You work or you don't eat. Simple. Give to the country instead of taking from it. If you are hungry offer to work in a field for food. I did all of those things and am better off for it.

Term limits for politicians and term limits for welfare recipients.
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Old 04-05-2009, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
41,974 posts, read 75,239,807 times
Reputation: 66945
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2mares View Post
Distribute it like the gov. commodities or soup kitchen lines to those who have FS cards. Simple.
Obviously you didn't read my entire post, or you wouldn't call distributing perishable food as "simple." There's nothing simple about it. Oh, and ... any creditable soup kitchen will feed anyone, and not discriminate based on whether someone is eligible for food stamps or not.

Consider, say, 100 pounds of mashed potatoes leftover from a restaurant is going to a soup kitchen. Every person handling that food must be trained in food safety, from the person at the restaurant scooping the food into portable containers, to the driver, to the person accepting the food at the charity. Given the often transient nature of employees of both food service establishments and grassroots charities, you'd be training people all the time.

The restaurant must have the personnel available to pack up the food, and room to store until it can be picked up or delivered. Someone's got to deliver the food to the charity, whether that be a delivery from the restaurant, or a truck driver from the charity. If the food is perishable and the charity is any distance at all from the restaurant, you'd better have some means available to ensure the quality and safety of the food, and trays of mashed potatoes aren't going to fit into a Coleman cooler.

Then, the charity must have a place to store the food until it's used. Most soup kitchens, and even regional food banks, run on tight budgets. Private donations and foundation grants are flat, if not decreasing this year. Adding refrigerated or frozen food storage is expensive.

Timing is another issue. Even if the restaurant is nice enough to deliver the food, someone at the charity has to be physically present to accept it. Soup kitchens and restaurants rarely keep the same hours, nor does either the restaurant or the charity have the discretionary income to pay overtime.

And if you throw in a middleman -- a regional food bank, for instance, where many food service companies donate their perishable foods -- there's an additional layer of logistics to consider.
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