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Old 10-05-2010, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 38,774,074 times
Reputation: 7185

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Quote:
Originally Posted by filihok View Post
Humans weren't and aren't designed to do anything
I think that using "designed" in that context can be forgiven and I doubt anyone was trying to offend you by implicating the existence of a Judeo-Christian model god.
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Old 10-05-2010, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
13,285 posts, read 15,300,979 times
Reputation: 6658
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
I think that using "designed" in that context can be forgiven and I doubt anyone was trying to offend you by implicating the existence of a Judeo-Christian model god.
I wasn't offended and it has nothing to do with 'intelligent design', it is backward thinking to say, 'since we have canine teeth we are designed to eat meat'.
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Old 10-05-2010, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 38,774,074 times
Reputation: 7185
Quote:
Originally Posted by filihok View Post
I wasn't offended and it has nothing to do with 'intelligent design', it is backward thinking to say, 'since we have canine teeth we are designed to eat meat'.
Okay, okay, I was being presumptuous. Evangelical athiests are as annoying to me as the polar opposite. Sorry.

You're actually quite right.
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Old 10-07-2010, 03:14 PM
 
1,807 posts, read 3,323,111 times
Reputation: 1252
Steak at Peter Luger's >>>>>>>> vegan/vegetarian alternative
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Old 10-07-2010, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,050 posts, read 34,597,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by expect View Post
Steak at Peter Luger's >>>>>>>> vegan/vegetarian alternative
That might make an interesting study, if someone could get the funding for it. But the truth is, there is no such thing as a vegetarian alternative to a Luger's steak.
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Old 10-07-2010, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Sango, TN
24,868 posts, read 24,382,997 times
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Well lets see. Are Chimps naturally meat eaters? They eat protein in ants. They have been seen eating meat.

Are they doing what they were naturally born to do? I'd say so.

Being an omnivore is biologically and evolutionary good idea. Why limit yourself to one food product, when you can eat many different kinds.

Mammals eat meat, almost every mammal does eat some kind of meat, at least the most successful. The fact is, without the added protein of meat to our ancestors diets, we'd have never developed the massive brain that fuels our minds.
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Old 10-08-2010, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,016 posts, read 20,902,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Memphis1979 View Post
Well lets see. Are Chimps naturally meat eaters? They eat protein in ants. They have been seen eating meat.

Are they doing what they were naturally born to do? I'd say so.

Being an omnivore is biologically and evolutionary good idea. Why limit yourself to one food product, when you can eat many different kinds.

Mammals eat meat, almost every mammal does eat some kind of meat, at least the most successful. The fact is, without the added protein of meat to our ancestors diets, we'd have never developed the massive brain that fuels our minds.
I agree with almost all of your post except the part I highlighted in bold. Quite a few mammals are herbivores: rabbits, deer, elk, moose, cows, horses and zebras, elephants, giraffes, gorillas, and the various kinds of antelopes (such as gnus and impalas, etc.).
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Old 10-09-2010, 10:56 AM
 
4,246 posts, read 12,024,391 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nezlie View Post
I think when they started out life in the Garden of Eden, they were 100% frugivores (fruit eaters). The reason according to Genesis.. God made the trees available to them except for two trees, the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and the Tree of Life. He did not want them eating the fruits from those two trees, but they could from all the other trees. Of course we know that things changed after they were banished from the garden and had to adapt to an omnivorous diet.

I posted this because while some of us look for hard evidence on things, there are others that rely more on scripture. That should cover all the bases.

And who exactly was there writing down notes of this? Why does god need to go through all this when he knows the answer already?
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Old 10-09-2010, 12:28 PM
 
1,530 posts, read 3,943,383 times
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Our so-called "canine teeth" are "canine" in name only. Other plant-eaters (like gorillas, horses, and hippos) have "canines", and chimps, who are almost exclusively vegan, have massive canines compared to ours
Humans are natural plant-eaters -- in-depth article
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Old 10-09-2010, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Limbo
5,536 posts, read 7,109,209 times
Reputation: 5485
Anyone here care to guess what family these hundreds of species belong to?

  • Caryophyllales
    • Dioncophyllaceae
      • Triphyophyllum (1 species)
    • Droseraceae
      • Aldrovanda (1 species)
      • Dionaea (1 species)
      • Drosera (187 species)
    • Drosophyllaceae
      • Drosophyllum (1 species)
    • Nepenthaceae
      • Nepenthes (124+ species)
  • Ericales
    • Roridulaceae
      • Roridula (2 species)
    • Sarraceniaceae
      • Darlingtonia (1 species)
      • Heliamphora (18+ species)
      • Sarracenia (11 species)
  • Lamiales
    • Byblidaceae
      • Byblis (7+ species)
    • Lentibulariaceae
      • Genlisea (21+ species)
      • Pinguicula (96+ species)
      • Utricularia (225+ species)
  • Oxalidales
    • Cephalotaceae
      • Cephalotus (1 species)
  • Poales
    • Bromeliaceae
      • Brocchinia (2 species)
      • Catopsis (1 species)
  • Scrophulariales1
    • Pedaliaceae
      • Ibicella (1, non-carnivorous)
  • Violales1
    • Passifloraceae
      • Passiflora (1 species)
  • Asterales1
    • Stylidiaceae
      • Stylidium (? species)
Answer:
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