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Old 11-11-2007, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,297 posts, read 120,729,686 times
Reputation: 35920

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Quote:
Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
oh I know, that does happen. Then again, right as I was about to move away from suburbia, there were two to four new developments on either side of the highway that had leveled the wooded areas that were there previously. I wonder if there will be a bunch of empty houses sitting in the woods' places when i go back to Tenn. for Thanksgiving.


I'm pretty anti-suburb at this point, to tell the truth. But to each their own. Personally, i live in probably the densest neighborhood in Chicago and I wouldn't trade it for anything. I just grit my teeth every time I'm forced to go out to the 'burbs for work and try to understand what's so wonderful about places that look alike all over America with their best buys, wal marts, mcd's and chili's, that people spend hours upon hours in their cars to drive from their house to the city and back. I don't understand it, but as I said, to each their own.
Your tone is extremely condescending and you are making a lot of unwarrnated assumptions. First, that the burbs are the only places where all the houses look alike. Someone posted some pictures of some houses in Chicago (city) a while back; they all looked EXACTLY alike. There are many neighborhoods in Denver where the houses all look alike. When I was a visiting nurse there, I was in a lot of them. A few still had the original owners in them, who said they were all built at the same time. I guess home building hasn't changed all that much. Second, how do you know how much time I spend in my car? I live 4 1/2 miles from my work, my DH lives six miles away. We each have a commute of 10 - 15 min. That is less of a commute than we had when we lived in the city.
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Old 11-11-2007, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,402 posts, read 28,944,197 times
Reputation: 19090
"Second, how do you know how much time I spend in my car? I live 4 1/2 miles from my work, my DH lives six miles away. We each have a commute of 10 - 15 min. That is less of a commute than we had when we lived in the city."

Yes, this brings up a good point. There are many people who live out in the suburbs and commute more than an hour to jobs in the city. If you are going to live in the sprawl, one of the tricks to enjoying life is to get a job less than 10 miles from your home. Insist upon this--it's doable, believe it or not. There are more and more companies out here in the sprawl. In fact my sister-in-law here in Virginia commutes from Alexandria (close in, dense suburb) to a job in Ashburn (yup, out here in the sprawl). So, if she rally wanted to save money and be decrease her carbon footprint she should move out to the suburbs.
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Old 11-11-2007, 05:33 PM
 
3,631 posts, read 10,233,408 times
Reputation: 2039
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Your tone is extremely condescending and you are making a lot of unwarrnated assumptions. First, that the burbs are the only places where all the houses look alike. Someone posted some pictures of some houses in Chicago (city) a while back; they all looked EXACTLY alike. There are many neighborhoods in Denver where the houses all look alike. When I was a visiting nurse there, I was in a lot of them. A few still had the original owners in them, who said they were all built at the same time. I guess home building hasn't changed all that much. Second, how do you know how much time I spend in my car? I live 4 1/2 miles from my work, my DH lives six miles away. We each have a commute of 10 - 15 min. That is less of a commute than we had when we lived in the city.

Simmer down. I am entitled to my opinion, thank you. First of all, I wasn't talking about you personally. I was basically replying to other people saying how many on this forum are decidedly pro-suburbia. Secondly, I SAID "TO EACH THEIR OWN." I don't care if you, everyone else in this post, my parents, the president - whoever - lives in the suburbs. I was just saying that I wouldn't want to, judging by the fact that it took my boss and I more than two hours to get back into the city during rush hour (and it was just as bad going OUT of the city), and when you DO drive the expressways in the Chicago suburbs -- the big box chains and restaurants and strip malls and houses look EXACTLY where I moved from, excepting the fact that there are hills in suburban Nashville and none in Chicago.

I never said that the houses in the city don't look alike, some of them do. But overall there is more variety of architectural styles in addition to different businesses than your local walmart or sonic.

There's really no need for you to get so offended. I like living in the city; I promise I won't be in your suburbia anytime soon.
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Old 11-11-2007, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,297 posts, read 120,729,686 times
Reputation: 35920
Quote:
Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
Simmer down. I am entitled to my opinion, thank you. First of all, I wasn't talking about you personally. I was basically replying to other people saying how many on this forum are decidedly pro-suburbia. Secondly, I SAID "TO EACH THEIR OWN." I don't care if you, everyone else in this post, my parents, the president - whoever - lives in the suburbs. I was just saying that I wouldn't want to, judging by the fact that it took my boss and I more than two hours to get back into the city during rush hour (and it was just as bad going OUT of the city), and when you DO drive the expressways in the Chicago suburbs -- the big box chains and restaurants and strip malls and houses look EXACTLY where I moved from, excepting the fact that there are hills in suburban Nashville and none in Chicago.

I never said that the houses in the city don't look alike, some of them do. But overall there is more variety of architectural styles in addition to different businesses than your local walmart or sonic.

There's really no need for you to get so offended. I like living in the city; I promise I won't be in your suburbia anytime soon.
Maybe YOU should simmer down. The tone was very condescending.
Quote:
I just grit my teeth
is not exactly positive or accepting of someone else's choice.
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Old 11-11-2007, 05:52 PM
 
3,631 posts, read 10,233,408 times
Reputation: 2039
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittnurse70 View Post
Maybe YOU should simmer down. The tone was very condescending. is not exactly positive or accepting of someone else's choice.

Seriously? You're taking me that seriously? Funny.

Once again, the "To each their own" thing, that means that I frankly DO NOT CARE what choice you or anyone else made. Ok? And I said I grit my teeth because I don't make a habit of telling the people that I do meet in the suburbs that I can't understand their lifestyle. I feel this way because I have seen the place I pretty much grew up in go from rural to the same chain stores and restaurants and houses that repeat themselves ten miles up the road. I lived in it for 13 years and saw it change. I went from being able to drive to Nashville in 30 minutes all the time to having to sit an hour to an hour and a half if I caught traffic at the wrong time. Sorry if I sounded condescending or whatever. My bad.
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Old 11-11-2007, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,402 posts, read 28,944,197 times
Reputation: 19090
I don't think supernerdgirl was attacking anyone, she was just stating her own opinion. I don't mind if people grit their teeth when faced with people who live an alternative lifestyle. Gritting your teeth is a lot better than baring your fangs!

I do think it's ironic that many people like her make blanket judgements about a large population of people simply because they have a lifestyle that is alternative to hers... and at the same time they act so smug about how they have so much tolerance for alternative lifestyles.

Think about it--being tolerant of an alternative lifestyle doesn't simply mean getting along with someone with a different sexual preference. Suburban life is definitely an alternative lifestyle to city life--so live where you are happy, but if you really want to brag about your lack of prejudice, don't be prejudiced against us.

I also think it's ironic that it's "ok" to live in the inner suburbs, even though those also "look all alike". The only real difference is that they feature the design and stores that were being cloned left and right in the 50's. I can remember when towns like McLean were "out in the boonies." Now it's cool. But all that's changed is the passage of time. In another 30 years I guess you'll consider my town "ok" becuase some other place will be even farther out. So basically your real gripe against my town is that it's ahead of it's time...

Don't accuse me of raping the land because I choose to live away from the urban core. My carbon footprint is smaller than many people who live closer to the city. I live near my job, my school, my friends. I walk along trails behind my development to the strip mall, which has a grocery store and all the other places that I shop (so I rarely need a car). I have a 1/4 acre of native plants and vegetables that I eat. My house is more energy efficient than my sister-in-law's smaller, older and infinitely hotter all-brick house in Alexandria. I am definitely not raping the land that I own, any more than your homosexual neighbor is raping his partner (or, if you happen to be gay... than your alternative lifestyle straight neighbor is raping his partner).
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Old 11-11-2007, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,402 posts, read 28,944,197 times
Reputation: 19090
...and reading this I see that I'm now sarting to sound annoyed. And dramatic. Sorry about that! It's silly, really--my bad.

You know what I really think? It's a good thing to have people wanting to live in cities, inner suburbs, outer suburbs, small towns, wherever. If everyone wanted to live in my town, they'd run the cost of real estate even higher.

It's too bad some people choose to put me down because I choose to live an alternative lifestyle (i.e., I live in the suburbs). It does get old to sit back quietly, listening to insults. But life is too short for endless debates. Enjoy your city living, and thanks for sharing.
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Old 11-11-2007, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
90,297 posts, read 120,729,686 times
Reputation: 35920
normie: I'd give you a rep for post #36, but I already gave you one this morning. My thoughts are similar to yours: it's like being accepting of an alternative sexual lifestyle. You don't show your acceptance by being sanctimonious about your own lifestyle and how it's somehow better, and saying you just don't "understand".

I DO understand the urban lifestyle. I lived it for many years, in three different cities. I enjoyed it. I was ready for something else. I wanted to have a garden. Etc.

So some may profess to not understand why I want to live the way I live, but I really DO understand why they want their lifestyle.
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Old 11-11-2007, 08:08 PM
 
1,453 posts, read 4,929,926 times
Reputation: 336
I don't consider living in an urban area a lifestyle. Not for most of the folks I know anyway. And most def not for me. It's where I live.

There are people who live in urban areas who have suburban mindsets- particularly in the south and in the west.

Living in a small to medium city in the northeast is very different than living in NYC or Chicago. Life generally revolves around different things in Binghamton than it does in NYC.
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Old 11-11-2007, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Midwest
1,903 posts, read 7,899,154 times
Reputation: 474
Nearly all cities of any age are controlled by greedy, turn-back-the-clock interests. The area along Neil Street immediately south of downtown Champaign, Illinois is all FOR SALE OR LEASE while the township and village of Savoy boom. The developments in downtown Champaign aren't much to discuss, because they are demand-driven, not supply-driven. The city has done very little to revitalize the older sections of the city. It appears forward-thinking only compared to Urbana.

When smaller cities like Akron or Champaign can't get their acts together, it means all hope is lost for bigger cities that don't have some immediate in-demand "factor."

Don't tax your businesses to death, keep up the infrastructure, and never rest on your laurels. Otherwise, you are dead. The call of exurbia is loud enough.
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