U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 08-09-2014, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 24,947,771 times
Reputation: 10632

Advertisements

One of the least utilized green energy sources to date is tidal power, which is driven by the gravitation pull of the moon as it rotates around the Earth. It's been reported there's a pilot program underway here on the Big Island, but I don't know anything about it. Now Wales is jumping into this promising arena with what is being called a significant milestone...

Quote:
Tidal power generator unveiling hailed as landmark

The 150-tonne demonstration device with a frame as high as a seven-storey building has been built in Pembroke Dock by Mustang Marine, recently saved from administration.

It will generate energy from tidal currents on the sea bed.

Tidal Energy Ltd claims the patented DeltaStream device will be Wales' first grid-connected freestanding tidal turbine.

Managing director Martin Murphy said the unveiling of the generator was a significant milestone, marking "the birth of the tidal industry in Wales".

BBC News - Tidal power generator unveiling hailed as landmark
One of the most intriguing things I see in this plan is that it doesn't involve any permanent construction. The base units are moveable, if desired, once the results start coming in. As the saying goes, "Nothing is cast in concrete."
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-09-2014, 11:48 AM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 9,215,821 times
Reputation: 6520
Would be very interesting to see if they could harness tidal power with desalination plants.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Central Nebraska
553 posts, read 512,865 times
Reputation: 562
Has anyone given any thought to the fact there's an hour's difference from the high tide of one day to the high tide of the next? Your lights will burn brightest at noon one day and at midnight about two weeks later. The electricity generated will taper off after high tide to ebb tide and build from ebb tide to high tide. How is this variable production of electricity going to be acomodated?

Tidal energy shares this variable production in common with most other alternative forms of energy, chief difference being that tidal power is predictable whereas wind, solar, and wave power are not.

In my opinion the best use of such variable electricity production would be to use the electricity to break water into hydrogen and oxygen and burn the hydrogen for dependable energy.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 12:09 PM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 9,215,821 times
Reputation: 6520
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAllenDoudna View Post
Has anyone given any thought to the fact there's an hour's difference from the high tide of one day to the high tide of the next? Your lights will burn brightest at noon one day and at midnight about two weeks later. The electricity generated will taper off after high tide to ebb tide and build from ebb tide to high tide. How is this variable production of electricity going to be acomodated?

Tidal energy shares this variable production in common with most other alternative forms of energy, chief difference being that tidal power is predictable whereas wind, solar, and wave power are not.

In my opinion the best use of such variable electricity production would be to use the electricity to break water into hydrogen and oxygen and burn the hydrogen for dependable energy.
Water is a scare resource, where would the H2O come from?
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Central Nebraska
553 posts, read 512,865 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
Water is a scare resource, where would the H2O come from?
Uh, how about the ocean these things are setting in? I mean, you DO know what a tide is, don't you? The ocean is made of water and covers three-quarters of the planet so is therefore the most common thing here on this Earth. You may want to look at a globe or world map some time.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 01:04 PM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 9,215,821 times
Reputation: 6520
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAllenDoudna View Post
Uh, how about the ocean these things are setting in? I mean, you DO know what a tide is, don't you? The ocean is made of water and covers three-quarters of the planet so is therefore the most common thing here on this Earth. You may want to look at a globe or world map some time.
I'm going to ignore your dramatic overture and suggest to you that chemically speaking salt water refinery is much more complex than using freshwater.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Lebanon, OH
6,225 posts, read 6,969,147 times
Reputation: 13266
This is already being done in Eastport Maine and the surrounding area, the turbines look like reel mower blades and will generate power no matter which way the tide is flowing or when high tide is. The water level is either rising or falling as much as five feet an hour with maximum levels at 28 feet, to see how it works google Eastport Maine Tidal Power

These are pics I took in Eastport on one of my trips there.











Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 24,947,771 times
Reputation: 10632
Quote:
Originally posted by OpenD
Actually, in terms of hydrolysis of water into hydrogen, sea water is better than fresh water, because salt is a natural electroyte. With fresh water you have to add salt, or another electrolyte such as lithium, in order for the process to be efficient.
"How much better?" you might ask...

Quote:
Electrolysis of pure water requires excess energy in the form of overpotential to overcome various activation barriers. Without the excess energy the electrolysis of pure water occurs very slowly or not at all. This is in part due to the limited self-ionization of water. Pure water has an electrical conductivity about one millionth that of seawater. Many electrolytic cells may also lack the requisite electrocatalysts. The efficiency of electrolysis is increased through the addition of an electrolyte (such as a salt, an acid or a base) and the use of electrocatalysts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolysis_of_water

Last edited by OpenD; 08-10-2014 at 05:13 PM..
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 04:34 PM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 9,215,821 times
Reputation: 6520
Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
Actually, in terms of hydrolysis of water into hydrogen, sea water is better than fresh water, because salt it is a natural electroyte. With fresh water you have to add salt, or another electrolyte such as lithium, in order for the process to be efficient.
Good luck with the chloride gas that is produced.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-10-2014, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 24,947,771 times
Reputation: 10632
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
Good luck with the chloride gas that is produced.
It's an important and valuable byproduct of the process, yes.
Rate this post positively Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top