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Old 03-21-2014, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Portal to the Pacific
8,114 posts, read 7,171,426 times
Reputation: 11752

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ontheroad View Post
I've gone around and around on water. In NM, I always bought water and think it was a wise decision, but expensive and yes, a resource poor choice.

Now, I am again using a filter for well water, and generally it tastes good.

However, I think bottled water was and is a chic concept in the States and not one of necessity.

When traveling in countries where water-borne diseases are common (SA, Africa) it is imperative to buy and drink clean water, but is a luxury traveling across the States.

Unfortunately, I might note like the telephone box, water fountains are a thing of the past--except in some rare instances like some streets in Portland (OR) or the Zoo.
Really? Where are you at? I don't find that I have a problem finding a water fountain. In a pinch I've always been able to fill up on water from the soda fountain (but usually it has a hint of lime flavor.. oh well..).
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Old 03-21-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Portal to the Pacific
8,114 posts, read 7,171,426 times
Reputation: 11752
I am really against buying bottled water. When we were on a 6 week road trip last year I made sure each of us had a water bottle and we filled it up each morning and if we were going on a hike in a national park we filled it up at the information center.

That said, you can bet your bottom dollar I bought the biggest container of bottled water when we were in Mexico over the holidays and used that to fill up our water containers. I was once sick for 4 weeks from drinking a glass of freshly made lemonade using tap at a reststop on the way to Acapulco and it was horrible.
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Old 03-22-2014, 11:04 AM
 
7,280 posts, read 9,983,420 times
Reputation: 11478
Social engineering can fix the problem with waste plastic, including plastic bottles. The problem is that the easy answer is to ban something instead of dealing with why the problem exists in the first place.

Glass containers don't fix the problem, people throw them away too.

Air pollution? Ban cars. Cancers? Ban cigarettes. Bans are shortsighted half measures that simply reduce choices. Spend the money to allow for choices and educate people into making the better choices and you can avoid banning things.

It seems the only way to deal with problems these days is to ban something, penalize people for doing something or paying them to do or not do something. The idea of educating people in a way that changes behavior because of choice and not penalty got lost somewhere.

We spend millions of dollars trying to figure out how to train monkeys and chimps to interact with humans yet can't figure out how to get people to change a simple behavior like choosing to recycle plastic bottles.
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Old 03-22-2014, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 25,987,931 times
Reputation: 10679
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingsaucermom View Post
I am really against buying bottled water. When we were on a 6 week road trip last year I made sure each of us had a water bottle and we filled it up each morning and if we were going on a hike in a national park we filled it up at the information center.
I live just a few miles from Volcanoes National Park, which sells refillable water bottles in their gift shops, and has filling stations in several places that feature filtered rainwater. It's the best!

Quote:
That said, you can bet your bottom dollar I bought the biggest container of bottled water when we were in Mexico over the holidays and used that to fill up our water containers. I was once sick for 4 weeks from drinking a glass of freshly made lemonade using tap at a reststop on the way to Acapulco and it was horrible.
Personally I travel with a Sawyer "hollow fiber" water filter, which can convert toxic ditchwater into safe, potable water. You can buy them at camping stores like REI, or online. Best of all, they have an unlimited lifetime as long as you perform minimal maintenance, and can even be used to make urban tap water safe.
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Old 03-22-2014, 04:34 PM
 
7,280 posts, read 9,983,420 times
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Almost all urban tap water is safe. The taste is another matter.
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Old 03-22-2014, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 8,275,590 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack Knife View Post
Social engineering can fix the problem with waste plastic, including plastic bottles. The problem is that the easy answer is to ban something instead of dealing with why the problem exists in the first place.

Glass containers don't fix the problem, people throw them away too.

Air pollution? Ban cars. Cancers? Ban cigarettes. Bans are shortsighted half measures that simply reduce choices. Spend the money to allow for choices and educate people into making the better choices and you can avoid banning things.

It seems the only way to deal with problems these days is to ban something, penalize people for doing something or paying them to do or not do something. The idea of educating people in a way that changes behavior because of choice and not penalty got lost somewhere.

We spend millions of dollars trying to figure out how to train monkeys and chimps to interact with humans yet can't figure out how to get people to change a simple behavior like choosing to recycle plastic bottles.
So, how do you propose to get them to change?
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Old 03-22-2014, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 25,987,931 times
Reputation: 10679
Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
Personally I travel with a Sawyer "hollow fiber" water filter, which can convert toxic ditchwater into safe, potable water. You can buy them at camping stores like REI, or online. Best of all, they have an unlimited lifetime as long as you perform minimal maintenance, and can even be used to make urban tap water safe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack Knife View Post
Almost all urban tap water is safe. The taste is another matter.
I forgot to say, be sure to get the optional Humor Bypass Shunt, because otherwise all the life-giving jokes will be removed.
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Old 03-25-2014, 09:29 AM
 
7,280 posts, read 9,983,420 times
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Changing people...

Ever visit large cities where the homeless collect all kinds of things (other places too but big cities as an example)?

Notice some of them walking around with plastic trash bags filled with plastic bottles? Now why would someone like that walk up and down sidewalks and along the streets collecting plastic bottles unless there was some benefit to it? Apparently they aren't saving all those plastic bottles nor are they for the most part, just helping out with cleaning up the sidewalks because they like clean sidewalks or the shoulders of roadways.

Apparently, some homeless (could be they are not) have figured out what all the geniuses can't. They are collecting plastic bottles discarded by others and going to recycling centers in the communities and getting money for them.

Maybe some of the geniuses should ask them why they do it, how much money they make doing so and then figure out that while plastic bottles are a problem, the larger problem isn't the plastic bottles.

I use the term geniuses because it seems only they can figure out what it takes to figure such things out.

Some want to ban things, others see opportunity. The problem with the opportunity is that it takes work, banning things doesn't.
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Old 03-25-2014, 11:43 AM
Zot
 
Location: 3rd rock from a nearby star
468 posts, read 630,939 times
Reputation: 747
A boo-degradable bottle would be nice. People are used to disposable bottles, but it seems instead of government mandating degradable bottles, we just pay 5 or 10 cents and toss em. The deposit doesn't seem to be used for clean up. Somehow there must be a way to get easier to recycle bottles, or degradable bottles.
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Old 03-25-2014, 01:05 PM
 
7,280 posts, read 9,983,420 times
Reputation: 11478
Comes down to path of least resistance. Choices usually involve change and change has resistance built in. Eliminate the choice and with it goes a lot of resistance.

What is strange though, is that the bans come from self identified environmentalists who desire, expect or demand others change yet support bans that eliminate choice. Just reading what is written (even right on CD) the efforts that are acceptable to getting people to use alternative energy is huge compared to any efforts to say, get people to recycle a plastic bottle or bag.

One would think that if anything, banning wood based products would be higher on the list because almost every product that results from recycling wood or wood based products results in a lower value product as the result. That isn't the case with plastic. When plastic is recycled, it is often used to make products that are higher in value than the original product discarded.
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