U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-30-2019, 03:27 PM
 
5,771 posts, read 4,151,374 times
Reputation: 11996

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Withinpines View Post
I can smell/taste laundry products/air freshener on food and products purchased at regular grocery stores. Baked goods, cellophaned meat, paper towels etc absorb the fragrance through the packaging. We've returned bread, cookies, muffins, that tasted/ smelled like laundry detergent. Any book, paper good, school supply, stationary item, absorbs scented ambient store air. I no longer buy gifts/toys/books at Fred Meyer because they smell heavily fragranced. A sealed puzzle I bought smelled like air freshener. We've opened cereal packages that smell of fabric softener inside the bag. Shopping online isn't much better, some stuff has arrived fragranced also. Costco's food sometimes smells like laundry detergent/fabric softener. Whole foods and natural markets are the only place we shop for food that's not contaminated from heavily fragranced products or ambient store air.
Oh my gosh, that sounds horrible. You must be very sensitive to smells and tastes to pick that up. There's another thread about someone who smells the latex in mattresses. My mom complains about something she smells in clothing stores. She keeps trying to get me to agree with her, I just have never smelled it and I thought I was pretty sensitive too. She said a clerk once told her she could barely work there because of the smell.

I was taught by an anatomy professor years ago that your olfactory nerve can only smell smells for a very short time - seconds, that the smells are still there, but if we could smell everything constantly, we would go insane. I always thought that was interesting.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-30-2019, 04:21 PM
 
422 posts, read 550,675 times
Reputation: 597
Sunday I spent some time in my big camper, which is parked at a friend's home while she travels. It's been winterised and closed up for a good month.
I walked in to the camper and was damn near overcome w fragrance from something. It took me a half hour of searching to find the scented trash bags she had stashed in a cabinet---and a full day of open windows with the heat blasting for the smell to become bearable. I'm moving the camper.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2019, 05:10 PM
 
Location: stuck in the woods with bears and moose
23,409 posts, read 22,557,014 times
Reputation: 42339
Quote:
Originally Posted by suz1023 View Post
Sunday I spent some time in my big camper, which is parked at a friend's home while she travels. It's been winterised and closed up for a good month.
I walked in to the camper and was damn near overcome w fragrance from something. It took me a half hour of searching to find the scented trash bags she had stashed in a cabinet---and a full day of open windows with the heat blasting for the smell to become bearable. I'm moving the camper.
That's terrible. I don't know why people think things needs to be artificially scented like this. One time we bought those scented trash bags by mistake and couldn't wait to use them up as fast as we could. People are ignorant if they think these chemically scented items are a good choice.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2019, 07:46 PM
 
279 posts, read 104,654 times
Reputation: 496
Years ago I started becoming ill from fragrances. It's crazy there are now so many overpoweringly scented products that didn't exist 5 years ago. It has seriously limited where I go and who comes into our home. A washer repairman wore clothing that stunk up our entire house. The smell remained in the laundry room the rest of the day. Those fragrances permanently stick in our furniture from guests who use that stuff. What's even worse is sitting on something that's been febreezed; the smell never comes out of your clothes and transfers to everything it's washed with. I become ill from people's heavily scented clothing and cant go to homes if there is a plug in or febreeze. I'll develop flu like symptoms, migraine, cold symptoms for days. Now, anytime any of my family go anywhere, we smell scented when we return home. Stores, dr offices, schools, most businesses now use air freshener that hits you in the face when you walk in.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2019, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Puna, Hawaii
2,681 posts, read 2,761,284 times
Reputation: 4229
I have a question:

We line dry our clothes and this requires adding fabric softener to the washing machine. If we buy an unscented variety the clothes often have an off smell due to drying in high humidity, but if we use a scented variety (the lightest scent we can find) it's a little too strong.

Keeping these issues in mind, can anybody recommend a good fabric softener?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2019, 09:24 PM
 
279 posts, read 104,654 times
Reputation: 496
No one in my family or extended family has ever used fabric softener or dryer sheets. We all use unscented detergent only. I use Dr Bronners for every single thing in my home. No one needs fabric softener. The "off" smell is the chemical build up from scented laundry products. After a few washes in unscented, those chemicals will wash out. Your clothes will then smell like you. We had to do this process to my college daughters wardrobe when she returned home. Her clothing aquired scent from the dorm machines and also smelled "off". Those chemicals that bind the scent actually smell rancid, almost like urine, cigarette smoke or fried food undertones, in addition to the chemically plasticky fake fragrance. Grape Gain scent is so chemical smelling it kind of smells like its mixed with cigarette smoke when it circu lates through our neighborhood. A friend thinks it smells like rotten meat, especially when the clothing is wet. Those chemicals just "go bad" in your clothing. There's nothing to "go bad" in unscented products.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2019, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
29,588 posts, read 28,640,149 times
Reputation: 37350
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
My immune system sometimes goes into overdrive. During those times I can't even walk down the laundry aisle in a store. One time I managed to find unscented dryer sheets. When I got home, the box smelled strongly of scent. I took one unopened box back to the store and complained to the maker. After about two weeks, the opened box no longer smelled. Just sitting on a shelf next to the scented ones had contaminated it. The stuff is evil. May the maker's expensive champagne reek of the stench.
Fortunately, I just get a headache.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2019, 02:41 AM
 
19,976 posts, read 60,262,521 times
Reputation: 37300
Quote:
Originally Posted by Withinpines View Post
No one in my family or extended family has ever used fabric softener or dryer sheets. We all use unscented detergent only. I use Dr Bronners for every single thing in my home. No one needs fabric softener. The "off" smell is the chemical build up from scented laundry products. After a few washes in unscented, those chemicals will wash out. Your clothes will then smell like you. We had to do this process to my college daughters wardrobe when she returned home. Her clothing aquired scent from the dorm machines and also smelled "off". Those chemicals that bind the scent actually smell rancid, almost like urine, cigarette smoke or fried food undertones, in addition to the chemically plasticky fake fragrance. Grape Gain scent is so chemical smelling it kind of smells like its mixed with cigarette smoke when it circu lates through our neighborhood. A friend thinks it smells like rotten meat, especially when the clothing is wet. Those chemicals just "go bad" in your clothing. There's nothing to "go bad" in unscented products.
To add to this, sometimes old detergents can "sour." It isn't common in the bottle, but does happen and happens in washers regularly. If clothes smell off, that can be from a build-up in the washer on out-of-sight places like the outside of the drum or seals. A couple of empty loads with the bleach compartment full of bleach is often enough to clear the funk. Citric acid or vinegar could also be used, but the chance of corrosion is higher and those are less likely to kill any mold.

I disagree about the need for fabric softener, although I do think it is over-used. Towels in particular won't dry properly and can retain body odor if washed repeatedly with fabric softener, which literally coats the fibers with a chemically modified fat. OTOH, I grew up in a house where you didn't want to fart and touch a doorknob at the same time, for fear of explosions. Fabric softener stops that.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2019, 06:11 AM
 
422 posts, read 550,675 times
Reputation: 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by terracore View Post
I have a question:

We line dry our clothes and this requires adding fabric softener to the washing machine. If we buy an unscented variety the clothes often have an off smell due to drying in high humidity, but if we use a scented variety (the lightest scent we can find) it's a little too strong.

Keeping these issues in mind, can anybody recommend a good fabric softener?

I use copious amounts of white vinegar instead of fabric softeners. I don't measure, just glug in a half cup or so to the wash. It works best w fabrics which haven't been exposed to softeners already, especially towels.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-31-2019, 08:28 AM
 
5,771 posts, read 4,151,374 times
Reputation: 11996
Google Hyperosmia - being oversensitive to smells. It can be caused by another medical condition and may go away once treated.

The article also suggests chewing peppermint gum when dealing with an overwhelming smell.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top