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Old 04-12-2021, 11:03 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
34,759 posts, read 63,106,010 times
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Those are actually great for putting down mole holes in the lawn or near plants in the garden to keep pests away. In addition to annoying humans, they annoy rodents and other animals.
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Old 04-12-2021, 11:15 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
88,939 posts, read 83,168,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Withinpines View Post
This has been the situation at our home for a few years. It comes in our windows nearly round the clock now. We keep the windows closed even on nights we need to cool the house down. These new stronger scented laundry products actually make us feel sick. They transfer onto clothing when sitting on public seating and don't wash out. I miss the old formulations that weren't pollution. We don't feel we should be forced to breathe this stuff inside our home or in our own yard. We're given no choice and rarely breathe fresh air at home anymore.
This exhaust can be toxic to people with chemical sensitivities. In addition to the dryer products,. studies have shown that Tide detergent has particularly strong chemical odors, and releases exhaust that's toxic to some people.
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Old 04-12-2021, 07:37 PM
 
295 posts, read 108,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
It sounds disgusting and I feel sorry for those kids too. Who knows what long term damage is being done to them by all those chemicals. Speaking of Gain, I bought some by mistake a few years ago. Gag. Even just taking the top off nearly knocked me over with the strong stink. I don't know how I ever used it up. Maybe I threw it out.

Too many artificial chemicals in our food and even in our clothes if people are going to wash their clothes in stuff like this. It's sort of the sign of a stupid person if they spend money on this stuff and then go ahead and actually expose their kids, their pets, themselves to the toxins. When will people ever learn?
Thanks New England. I always enjoy your posts because I know you "get it". I hope more people will figure this all out.
I miss the 1970''s-90''s when this stuff wasn't an issue. In the meantime we plan on moving way out to the middle of nowhere in about a year.
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Old 04-12-2021, 07:37 PM
 
Location: California
32,971 posts, read 36,528,844 times
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I've been using unscented detergents for decades, no fabric softeners, dryer sheets or beads or any of that nonsense either. A few year ago I was reading reviews online of the best detergents and got curious, people said that this or that "just smelled like clean laundry" and that sounded good and over time I bought a couple of them to try, I remember specifically Gain and Persil were highly touted. I didn't like them at all and my son nearly gagged. He has an office set up in the garage and keeps the side door open...right next to the dryer vent.
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Old 04-12-2021, 07:41 PM
 
295 posts, read 108,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
This exhaust can be toxic to people with chemical sensitivities. In addition to the dryer products,. studies have shown that Tide detergent has particularly strong chemical odors, and releases exhaust that's toxic to some people.
Thanks for that info Ruth!
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Old 04-12-2021, 07:51 PM
 
295 posts, read 108,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceece View Post
I've been using unscented detergents for decades, no fabric softeners, dryer sheets or beads or any of that nonsense either. A few year ago I was reading reviews online of the best detergents and got curious, people said that this or that "just smelled like clean laundry" and that sounded good and over time I bought a couple of them to try, I remember specifically Gain and Persil were highly touted. I didn't like them at all and my son nearly gagged. He has an office set up in the garage and keeps the side door open...right next to the dryer vent.
Hi Ceece, I use Dr Bronners. I was raised by hippie parents in California and learned to live safe and heallthy starting in the late 60's.
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Old 04-13-2021, 09:49 AM
 
6,979 posts, read 3,313,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ceece View Post
I've been using unscented detergents for decades, no fabric softeners, dryer sheets or beads or any of that nonsense either. A few year ago I was reading reviews online of the best detergents and got curious, people said that this or that "just smelled like clean laundry" and that sounded good and over time I bought a couple of them to try, I remember specifically Gain and Persil were highly touted. I didn't like them at all and my son nearly gagged. He has an office set up in the garage and keeps the side door open...right next to the dryer vent.
Strange- you’d think clean laundry would just have no smell at all. I use unscented as well with dryer balls.

I have to admit that the dryer smells don’t bother me as much as the scented trash bags. Those tend to have more “stealth” smells. They aren’t labeled as being un smelly and then they are... like, I just want a regular bag, people. I don’t need to have trash smelling like trash WITH an artificial scent.
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Old 04-13-2021, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
18,066 posts, read 14,373,533 times
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I have to wonder if formaldehyde plays a large roll in this sensitivity to the fragrances in laundry products: https://www.bustle.com/p/7-household...-them-9690519? Formaldehyde is one of those chemicals that some of us can live with (to a degree) and some of us are super-sensitive to even the smallest exposure. It is all about individual tolerance.

My thinking is that maybe some of the fragrances might contain the smallest concentration of formaldehyde as a preservative and some might not. But I don't know, I am just asking.

Many years ago a group of 12 of us were exposed to a strong formaldehyde smell. Most of us simply had burning eyes and a sore throat. But one woman in the group turned blue and stopped breathing. If it was not for a quick response from a paramedic team and removing her from the source, I think we would have lost her. While formaldehyde is a great preservative it has many dangers.
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Old 04-13-2021, 08:20 PM
 
Location: stuck in the woods with bears and moose
23,440 posts, read 22,602,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I have to wonder if formaldehyde plays a large roll in this sensitivity to the fragrances in laundry products: https://www.bustle.com/p/7-household...-them-9690519? Formaldehyde is one of those chemicals that some of us can live with (to a degree) and some of us are super-sensitive to even the smallest exposure. It is all about individual tolerance.

My thinking is that maybe some of the fragrances might contain the smallest concentration of formaldehyde as a preservative and some might not. But I don't know, I am just asking.

Many years ago a group of 12 of us were exposed to a strong formaldehyde smell. Most of us simply had burning eyes and a sore throat. But one woman in the group turned blue and stopped breathing. If it was not for a quick response from a paramedic team and removing her from the source, I think we would have lost her. While formaldehyde is a great preservative it has many dangers.
It's a lot of different chemicals. Formaldehyde was the culprit in particle board that caused a lot of publicity over its dangers. It's used in plywood too and other building materials. We get exposed to it in biology lab because the specimens we had to dissect were preserved in it. It's in a lot of things.

Formaldehyde is a sensitizing agent that can cause an immune system response upon initial exposure. It is also a cancer hazard. Acute exposure is highly irritating to the eyes, nose, and throat and can make anyone exposed cough and wheeze. Subsequent exposure may cause severe allergic reactions of the skin, eyes and respiratory tract. Ingestion of formaldehyde can be fatal, and long-term exposure to low levels in the air or on the skin can cause asthma-like respiratory problems and skin irritation such as dermatitis and itching.

https://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_Gen...factsheet.html

But I think most of the chemicals in these scented products are neurotoxins, or hormone disrupters, although some are probably carcinogens. The chemicals can be absorbed into your rugs, walls, curtains, furniture and then they get released again into the air so you get indoor air pollution.

There's no need to add an artificial stink to your home and it is dangerous to do it. When people start thinking this stuff smells good, that's a problem. It's like people enjoying the smell of gasoline--they've become sensitized to something that's toxic. But greedy industries have been pushing these artificial smells for years; it's nothing new. Smelly things that hang from the rear view mirror of cars, smelly chemical things that you plug in, smelly detergents and fabric softeners. Anything to make money and who cares if it's damaging anyone's health, right? Wash your kid's clothes in it! Make your kid's toys from it! Needs to be banned, not advertised and sold.
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Old 04-13-2021, 10:41 PM
 
295 posts, read 108,776 times
Reputation: 535
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
It's a lot of different chemicals. Formaldehyde was the culprit in particle board that caused a lot of publicity over its dangers. It's used in plywood too and other building materials. We get exposed to it in biology lab because the specimens we had to dissect were preserved in it. It's in a lot of things.

Formaldehyde is a sensitizing agent that can cause an immune system response upon initial exposure. It is also a cancer hazard. Acute exposure is highly irritating to the eyes, nose, and throat and can make anyone exposed cough and wheeze. Subsequent exposure may cause severe allergic reactions of the skin, eyes and respiratory tract. Ingestion of formaldehyde can be fatal, and long-term exposure to low levels in the air or on the skin can cause asthma-like respiratory problems and skin irritation such as dermatitis and itching.

https://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_Gen...factsheet.html

But I think most of the chemicals in these scented products are neurotoxins, or hormone disrupters, although some are probably carcinogens. The chemicals can be absorbed into your rugs, walls, curtains, furniture and then they get released again into the air so you get indoor air pollution.

There's no need to add an artificial stink to your home and it is dangerous to do it. When people start thinking this stuff smells good, that's a problem. It's like people enjoying the smell of gasoline--they've become sensitized to something that's toxic. But greedy industries have been pushing these artificial smells for years; it's nothing new. Smelly things that hang from the rear view mirror of cars, smelly chemical things that you plug in, smelly detergents and fabric softeners. Anything to make money and who cares if it's damaging anyone's health, right? Wash your kid's clothes in it! Make your kid's toys from it! Needs to be banned, not advertised and sold.
I'm pretty sure Europe's more cautious about emissions, VOCS,, air quality. I don't know about scented products tho. I think phthalates were banned long ago and clothes dryers aren't as prevalent.

We're building a home and researching each component. We're using exterior grade plywood because it out gasses quickly and uses a different formaldehyde than interior grade.
I'm reading on City Data taking an overdue break from researching boring sheathing, vapor barrier, insulation; sorting thru chemicals and the formaldehyde you speak of. Thanks New England.
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