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Old 04-19-2021, 09:16 PM
 
305 posts, read 115,644 times
Reputation: 562

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Some of it was an issue back then, but the issues weren't publicized like they are today. Nowadays, finally, MCS (multiple chemical sensitivity) is recognized as a real health issue, and the public is more informed about toxicity issues in general, including covert pollution of water supplies by industry, and so forth. Fabric softeners were invented in the 1960's. it's just taken awhile for public opinion to shift, from greeting that development as a wonderful "convenience" to noticing the chemical fallout, and considering it toxic.

I don't remember fabric softener ever being necessary when I grew up. I remember laundry hanging outside on the clothesline to be air-dried in the sun, coming in with nothing more than a fresh-air smell. Even when dried in the drier, laundry didn't need fabric softener. Was there some trick to washing/drying laundry, that some people knew back then, that industry advertising caused them to forget or disregard?
Powder was all that was available during my childhood. There were few powder choices with limited "flavors" that weren't detectable while wearing clothing.

Powder back then cleaned better/rinsed easier having less additives. Laundry felt and smelled cleaner. Formulations now are loaded full of plasticizers and pthalatest that cause a build up and eventual dirty waxy feeling. These coatings take on a rancid smell. This stuff isn't even really washing clothing, just coating it in fragranced wax and plastic.

I should have said they weren't an issue for me personally way back then. I didn't smell an odor wafting off of people's clothing or smell this stuff circulating through neighborhoods. The fragrances were mild almost undetectable during my childhhod.

Last edited by Withinpines; 04-19-2021 at 09:26 PM..
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Old 04-21-2021, 04:46 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,819 posts, read 14,556,628 times
Reputation: 23729
Laundry powders as you say werent perfumed the way they are now.. I cant walk down that supermarket aisle with all the new fangled ones as feel so ill and the one I use with no perfumes is also in that part so I have to go there.....I can smell my neighbours out the back garden and its horrible and I cant sit out on an ice sunny day. its so bad.. when some have their tumble driers on its even stronger.. There is no need at all to have scents in these products..
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Old 04-21-2021, 11:51 AM
 
Location: near bears but at least no snakes
23,485 posts, read 22,689,638 times
Reputation: 42576
Somebody told me to use Borax, washing soda, and Bon Ami (the yellow laundry bar soap from the olden days) and that's what I use. Borax is wonderful--look it up! It cleans and I think it helps sterilize. My clothes don't really get that dirty, they just need freshening up, so I can just use the Borax alone and it's fine.

I can't find any powder or liquid anymore that doesn't smell bad. Even the unscented is scented. So I'm in love with Borax and use either hot or cold water, doesn't matter. For stains I soak in Oxyclean. They say to make the mixture of Borax, washing soda, and Bon Ami before hand and put it into a container but, being lazy, I just dump some Borax into the washer and I may scrape some Bon Ami soap with a little knife. Never have used the washing soda.

Someone gave me some Tide Pods and YUCK! They do save on packaging but they smell and they look awful to me--that florescent turquoise color. Besides, I think you have to use an entire pod each time so that would be wasteful if you're just washing a very small load.

The recipe for the Borax, Bon Ami, washing soda mix is online and it tells how good it is--probably more effective than the high priced smelly stuff they want us to buy.
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Old 04-21-2021, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Mr. Roger's Neighborhood
2,594 posts, read 963,730 times
Reputation: 6984
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Somebody told me to use Borax, washing soda, and Bon Ami (the yellow laundry bar soap from the olden days) and that's what I use. Borax is wonderful--look it up! It cleans and I think it helps sterilize. My clothes don't really get that dirty, they just need freshening up, so I can just use the Borax alone and it's fine.

I can't find any powder or liquid anymore that doesn't smell bad. Even the unscented is scented. So I'm in love with Borax and use either hot or cold water, doesn't matter. For stains I soak in Oxyclean. They say to make the mixture of Borax, washing soda, and Bon Ami before hand and put it into a container but, being lazy, I just dump some Borax into the washer and I may scrape some Bon Ami soap with a little knife. Never have used the washing soda.

Someone gave me some Tide Pods and YUCK! They do save on packaging but they smell and they look awful to me--that florescent turquoise color. Besides, I think you have to use an entire pod each time so that would be wasteful if you're just washing a very small load.

The recipe for the Borax, Bon Ami, washing soda mix is online and it tells how good it is--probably more effective than the high priced smelly stuff they want us to buy.
I've seen similar recipes for homemade laundry soap, but never with Bon Ami soap, but with Fels-Naptha. I've never seen Bon Ami in a bar, but the F.N. I keep on hand for stain removal and as a treatment for post-poison ivy exposure. Borax I use more as a laundry booster and household cleaner. Great stuff.

I'm not a fan of scented laundry products or liquids and the unscented Seventh Generation and Ecover powders have become nearly impossible to find, so I now use a brand called Country Save with great results. It's truly unscented, eco-friendly, and cleans effectively. The only thing is that it's not sold in stores around here, so it must be drop shipped. (The best price online for it is through an appliance parts and supply warehouse called Parts IPS--under $15 for a ten pound box. I ordered two boxes last April and only recently dipped into the second box as a little goes a very long way.)

The only scent on my clothes is that left from the wind and sunshine when I dry things out on the line.

Last edited by Formerly Known As Twenty; 04-21-2021 at 01:21 PM..
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Old 04-21-2021, 01:15 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
89,084 posts, read 83,527,302 times
Reputation: 94125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Withinpines View Post
Powder was all that was available during my childhood. There were few powder choices with limited "flavors" that weren't detectable while wearing clothing.

Powder back then cleaned better/rinsed easier having less additives. Laundry felt and smelled cleaner. Formulations now are loaded full of plasticizers and pthalatest that cause a build up and eventual dirty waxy feeling. These coatings take on a rancid smell. This stuff isn't even really washing clothing, just coating it in fragranced wax and plastic.

I should have said they weren't an issue for me personally way back then. I didn't smell an odor wafting off of people's clothing or smell this stuff circulating through neighborhoods. The fragrances were mild almost undetectable during my childhhod.
Oh, wow. So this explains why, suddenly, around the late 80's/early 90's, people had to start rinsing their laundry twice, to get the soap out! I've always wondered about that!

So is there no laundry powder anymore? Is it all liquid? I use fragrance-free environmentally-sound liquid detergent at the moment, from the health food store or co-op. I don't know what the regular, commercial laundry soaps are like.
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Old 04-21-2021, 10:45 PM
 
305 posts, read 115,644 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Oh, wow. So this explains why, suddenly, around the late 80's/early 90's, people had to start rinsing their laundry twice, to get the soap out! I've always wondered about that!

So is there no laundry powder anymore? Is it all liquid? I use fragrance-free environmentally-sound liquid detergent at the moment, from the health food store or co-op. I don't know what the regular, commercial laundry soaps are like.
Idk either. Haven't been down that aisle in years. We used natural detergent and now Dr Bronners.
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Old 04-21-2021, 10:55 PM
 
305 posts, read 115,644 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by dizzybint View Post
Laundry powders as you say werent perfumed the way they are now.. I cant walk down that supermarket aisle with all the new fangled ones as feel so ill and the one I use with no perfumes is also in that part so I have to go there.....I can smell my neighbours out the back garden and its horrible and I cant sit out on an ice sunny day. its so bad.. when some have their tumble driers on its even stronger.. There is no need at all to have scents in these products..
Thanks for sharing this. I was curious if you too smell your neighbor's laundry/dryer vent exhaust in Scotland.
We come inside as soon as we smell our neighbor's dryer vent exhaust. We close our windows too.

Can you order your detergent then have it sent/shipped to you? Do your stores offer curbside pick up like ours here in the USA do? That way you won't have to enter the store and can avoid fragrances.

I have everything except groceries sent through the mail to avoid shopping and the associated fragrances.

Last edited by Withinpines; 04-21-2021 at 11:34 PM..
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Old 04-21-2021, 11:01 PM
 
305 posts, read 115,644 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Formerly Known As Twenty View Post
I've seen similar recipes for homemade laundry soap, but never with Bon Ami soap, but with Fels-Naptha. I've never seen Bon Ami in a bar, but the F.N. I keep on hand for stain removal and as a treatment for post-poison ivy exposure. Borax I use more as a laundry booster and household cleaner. Great stuff.

I'm not a fan of scented laundry products or liquids and the unscented Seventh Generation and Ecover powders have become nearly impossible to find, so I now use a brand called Country Save with great results. It's truly unscented, eco-friendly, and cleans effectively. The only thing is that it's not sold in stores around here, so it must be drop shipped. (The best price online for it is through an appliance parts and supply warehouse called Parts IPS--under $15 for a ten pound box. I ordered two boxes last April and only recently dipped into the second box as a little goes a very long way.)

The only scent on my clothes is that left from the wind and sunshine when I dry things out on the line.
My parents used Fels Naptha for poison oak. Borax for laundry. Bon Ami was a powder we scrubbed our sinks, tubs, toilets with. I remember a chick on the yellow canister? Maybe not?
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Old 04-21-2021, 11:16 PM
 
305 posts, read 115,644 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Somebody told me to use Borax, washing soda, and Bon Ami (the yellow laundry bar soap from the olden days) and that's what I use. Borax is wonderful--look it up! It cleans and I think it helps sterilize. My clothes don't really get that dirty, they just need freshening up, so I can just use the Borax alone and it's fine.

I can't find any powder or liquid anymore that doesn't smell bad. Even the unscented is scented. So I'm in love with Borax and use either hot or cold water, doesn't matter. For stains I soak in Oxyclean. They say to make the mixture of Borax, washing soda, and Bon Ami before hand and put it into a container but, being lazy, I just dump some Borax into the washer and I may scrape some Bon Ami soap with a little knife. Never have used the washing soda.

Someone gave me some Tide Pods and YUCK! They do save on packaging but they smell and they look awful to me--that florescent turquoise color. Besides, I think you have to use an entire pod each time so that would be wasteful if you're just washing a very small load.

The recipe for the Borax, Bon Ami, washing soda mix is online and it tells how good it is--probably more effective than the high priced smelly stuff they want us to buy.
The 2 times I bought Borax and baking soda, they had taken on the laundry aisle fragrances. Otherwise I like the idea.

I read any bar soap can be grated into the machine. Most people use a cheese grater, grating it on top of the dirty load.

People over complicate things. Didn't Laura Ingalls wash laundry using a washing board and a bar of soap in the creek?
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Old 04-22-2021, 03:22 AM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,819 posts, read 14,556,628 times
Reputation: 23729
Supermarkets need educated on what to have in aisles that some are sensitive to....one aisly in Asda that sells home goods like bedding. vases. saucepans etc also have scented candles and this also puts me off going near that area.. these horrid things seem to be everywhere now. and full of toxins ... isnt it time shops woke up to the problem. in fact isnt it about time the governments woke up to them and sorted this.. they dont seem to care.
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