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Old 02-15-2023, 02:52 PM
 
Location: on the wind
23,259 posts, read 18,764,714 times
Reputation: 75161

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Unless your toilets are leaking, you don't need to turn them off between uses. The water will just sit there until used.

This. Makes no sense to go to all the trouble to turn the valve on a non-leaking toilet off between uses. Of course, if you're turning the valve(s) off because the toilet(s) leak/run excessively, that should have been the first thing to address.

If your toilets are low flow, do NOT put a brick in the tank to cut back on water use. Low flow toilets are one reason why so many sewer lines get clogged - not enough water to push it down the pipe.

This. Low flow toilets often have enough trouble flushing solids with a full tank in the first place (which means you flush them again...wasting even more water ). Putting a brick in the tank just compounds the whole problem.

If your hair is kinda oily, do a dry shampoo. Dust baking soda all through it, let it sit a few minutes to absorb dirt and oil, then go outside and thoroughly brush it all out. Wash with water and shampoo not more than once a week. If your hair is dry, it can go a couple weeks without a shampoo and still not smell like a foot...

Corn starch works too.

If you don't have one, attach a cutoff into your shower hose, if you don't have a shower knob that keeps the temperature set. Wet down, push button to stop water flow, soap up, turn water back on, rinse. Navy shower -- works very well. We've used it for years now.

I bought hand held shower wands with incorporated water cutoffs years ago. No plumbing modification necessary. Just punch a button.

Last edited by Parnassia; 02-15-2023 at 03:28 PM..

 
Old 02-15-2023, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
23,656 posts, read 13,964,967 times
Reputation: 18855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaubleau View Post
I have adopted the Bear Grylls method of water conservation, especially as the day wears on and it gets closer to twilight.
Please explain (or provide a link); I have never heard of this person.
 
Old 02-15-2023, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,488 posts, read 10,482,288 times
Reputation: 21470
Or you could copy the habits of a teen son of one of our neighbors -

Eats pizza mostly, which he reheats in the microwave. Uses paper plates, so no dishes to wash.

Bathes irregularly; even then, not for long. Never washes his hair.

Laundry ends up on his bedroom floor, then out to the trash, to be replaced by cheap new stuff.

Does his No.1 right where he happens to be, outdoors. Nothing to flush. No.2 is unknown, but nothing would surprise me.

That kid could live without running water easily. Wifi? Not so much....
 
Old 02-16-2023, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
1,830 posts, read 1,428,248 times
Reputation: 5754
Nor'Eastah, I'm assuming you're being sarcastic, since paper plates and cheap new stuff still cost money that OP doesn't have.
 
Old 03-04-2023, 12:13 AM
 
Location: Ohio
2,310 posts, read 6,822,200 times
Reputation: 1950
Water can be used 2x in most instances. my mom always wash veg in a basin then use that water for watering veg plants out in the yard. I do that especially if the water is very sandy so I don't pour all that sand into the drain. Same w reusing the laundry or dishwashing rinse water for plants. The soapy water can be reused to flush toilet. If you run a dehumidifier, it generates buckets of water that's essentially distilled water... it's as dirty as the tank which is easy to get moldy. I wouldn't use it for consumption but fine for plants and toilet. Same w AC or furnace- you can collect the condensate.
 
Old 03-09-2023, 07:40 AM
 
3,934 posts, read 2,184,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmyk72 View Post
Water can be used 2x in most instances. my mom always wash veg in a basin then use that water for watering veg plants out in the yard. I do that especially if the water is very sandy so I don't pour all that sand into the drain. Same w reusing the laundry or dishwashing rinse water for plants. The soapy water can be reused to flush toilet. If you run a dehumidifier, it generates buckets of water that's essentially distilled water... it's as dirty as the tank which is easy to get moldy. I wouldn't use it for consumption but fine for plants and toilet. Same w AC or furnace- you can collect the condensate.
Don’t use distilled water for potted plants however - as it is an excellent solvent.

Good point regarding water molds, bacteria in the tank - could be pathogenic to plants as well.
 
Old 03-18-2023, 04:24 PM
 
1,706 posts, read 1,146,203 times
Reputation: 3884
FWIW a lot of gardeners use grey water to water lawns and gardens.

I had our washer set up to drain into the back yard.

Collecting rainwater is not too hard, make sure that you set barrels up correctly and do not allow mosquitos to breed.
 
Old 03-18-2023, 06:41 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
7,238 posts, read 5,114,062 times
Reputation: 17722
Believe it or not, collecting rainwater is restricted/regulated in some jurisdictions. https://www.worldwaterreserve.com/ra...ect-rainwater/

Recently came across this tip-- collect that initial shower water as you wait for it to warm up in a bucket for other uses-- flushing toilet, washing dishes, etc.
 
Old 03-19-2023, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Newburyport, MA
12,372 posts, read 9,473,336 times
Reputation: 15832
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parnassia View Post
You're taking fairly extreme measures already. If you get any precipitation at all, set up rain barrels wherever it runs off your roof, collect it and use it for tasks that don't result in ingestion: laundry, showering, toilet flushing.

FWIW and IIRC, you are way past Carter era water conservation recommendations. Plus, many of those were focused more on modification/design of the home itself: updating/replacing wasteful appliances, turning down water heater settings, using low flow faucets, showerheads and toilets, shortening plumbing runs, using timers for irrigation, detecting and repairing plumbing leaks. They also suggested very basic behaviors you should be doing already such as not running water while doing dishes, food prep, brushing teeth, shaving, short showers, putting bricks in toilet tanks (depending on the toilet that's not always a good idea).
Collecting rain water in a barrel is a good idea and won't cost a lot of money. A low flow showerhead can help a good deal too. They also make dual-flush toilets, like this American Standard unit that uses 0.9gal for #1 and 1.3gal for #2. Some people just leave the #1 deposits in there without flushing. Except for the last, these suggestions aren't free, but they are $100-$300, not thousands of dollars.

Out in the yard - landscaping with native plants that are adapted to low rainfall conditions will save a lot of water. Anything that can make it in the wild locally, can make it in your yard with little to no help. And if you're going to grow a garden, some vegetables require less water than others - here is one list:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/spe...vegetables.htm

...and here is a lot of info from New Mexico State University Ag Extension for growing a veggie garden in arid areas:
https://moraextension.nmsu.edu/docum...terveggies.pdf

Last edited by OutdoorLover; 03-19-2023 at 08:17 AM..
 
Old 03-19-2023, 04:34 PM
 
Location: on the wind
23,259 posts, read 18,764,714 times
Reputation: 75161
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Believe it or not, collecting rainwater is restricted/regulated in some jurisdictions. https://www.worldwaterreserve.com/ra...ect-rainwater/

Recently came across this tip-- collect that initial shower water as you wait for it to warm up in a bucket for other uses-- flushing toilet, washing dishes, etc.
True, though IME most households (and depending on the length of the hot water plumbing runs) produce a lot more "waiting for hot" water than there are immediate uses for. Then add greywater. At least that cold shower water is potable, unlike the greywater. Gotta keep a lot of buckets on hand!
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