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Old 05-03-2023, 03:25 PM
 
37,608 posts, read 45,978,731 times
Reputation: 57194

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Quote:
Originally Posted by L00k4ward View Post
If you are in a climate with a lot of annual precipitation the lawn is the easiest yard to maintain for people without knowledge, time or inclination to gardening and landscaping.

It is better for the climate compare to bare soil. It is better for the house in case of fire - firescaping.
There are other obvious advantages as well.

Don’t understand the hatred for the lawn. Yes, it is perhaps inappropriate in a dry locations with no water.

It is still supports some wildlife in the absence of alternatives
Yep. We get a lot of rain where I am - my sprinklers are turned off most of the summer. I love my pretty green lawn and my landscaping too. I probably have half the lawn area that I did when I bought the house, so I have a nice mix.
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Old 05-03-2023, 04:13 PM
 
9,952 posts, read 6,671,651 times
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I would love to have a full English Garden, but my yard is so large that it’s just not practical for me to buy that many plants. There are people in my neighborhood who have done it, but it seems like a lot of work. I have covered some of the area with raised beds and compost bins in the back, but I think I’m stuck with the lawn for now in the front.
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Old 05-03-2023, 04:15 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
7,255 posts, read 5,126,001 times
Reputation: 17752
Quote:
Originally Posted by quiet life View Post
... You would have to show me data about farmers using more chemicals than homeowners but us homeowners are more irresponsible with run-off. .
Not by a long shot....Farmers are generally very good about environmental concerns. The CRP program is easily the most effective thing going among any conservation efffort....

Farmers have a buffer zone along the edges of fields that serves to filter run-off (can't plant too close to streams anyways-- too wet to give good yield and edges would easily collapse into the stream)...But homeowners dump their ferilizers and chemicals onto lawns that are relatively impermeable compared to more natural grass/weed/wildflower land (ie- more run-off per sq ft ) and then, even worse, the run-off goes directly into storm sewers which usually dump that water directly into the rivers....

We could get into smaller details about famers being more frugal with the things they use (profit motive) while the homeowners are more likely to live by the American consummer's modus operandi-- If one is good, two must be better-- using more than they should....As I said, things would be much better if the homeowners would just follow the directions more responsibley.

You can search this stuff. It's been studied extensively and is in the agronomy literature.

edited to add-- Re: watering lawns...Most grasses are supposed to go dormant during the dry seasons. Watering a lawn isn't necessary for the health of the grass. Those who do it are perverting Nature for the aesthetic advantage...That's would be kinda like forcing an oak tree to retain its green leaves over the winter....I guess some people like deforming their Yew trees into geometric shapes too... De gustibus, non disputandum est.

Last edited by guidoLaMoto; 05-03-2023 at 04:24 PM..
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Old 05-03-2023, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Paradise CA, that place on fire
2,022 posts, read 1,738,739 times
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It is better for the climate compare to bare soil. It is better for the house in case of fire - firescaping.
There are other obvious advantages as well."
from Look4ward

How very true.

In the Paradise fire of 2018 our Vinca on the front stopped the fire and our house survived, albeit I ran the sprinklers for 45 minutes before evacuating. Our neighbors left and right had no lawn and lost their homes to the fire. Could be just a coincidence though, fires work in mysterious ways.

If you can afford it a lawn beats rocks and cactus anytime, just ask a trustworthy dog if you don't believe me.

Last edited by mgforshort; 05-03-2023 at 06:27 PM..
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Old 05-03-2023, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,750 posts, read 22,654,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MKTwet View Post
Why do we keep pouring money and energy resources into having a well manicured green lawn?
When we lived in WV we didn’t have to water and feed our lawn. It just grew. No harm no foul.

Here in Montana it’s advised (where we live) to have green lawn or non- combustible space 30ft outward from the house for fire mitigation purposes. Since we have dogs and acreage- grass it is. Ever try picking up dog crap on stone?

Try it and see which route you’d take.
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Old 05-04-2023, 05:56 AM
 
15,427 posts, read 7,482,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgforshort View Post
Lawns are beautiful and provide oxygen like the trees we have.

Our front yard doesn't have grass, but a ground cover called Vinca Minor. Evergreen with small blue flowers. Vinca grows very slowly but once it is established it never gets higher than 8-10 inches. No need to trim or move down, and it doesn't need much watering. You can walk on it. It stays green 12 months a year. Beside the watering it is maintenance free.
Fun fact. The vinca plants are full of interesting chemicals. The cancer drug vincristine was originally derived from a vinca family plant. Vinca minor has lots of different and useful chemicals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinca_minor.

We have a third of our front yard covered with a ground cover plant. Less water, less mowing.
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Old 05-04-2023, 06:00 AM
 
15,427 posts, read 7,482,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quiet life View Post
I am in partial agreement with you. Your medicine analogy is appropriate. I use weed and feed but only the prescribed dosage on my spreader. I don't saturate my property with it. I've seen some homeowners do that. Crazy. However, nothing wrong with getting your grass, landscaping as pristine as possible. You would have to show me data about farmers using more chemicals than homeowners but us homeowners are more irresponsible with run-off. Make it make sense.
Farmers use as many chemicals as they need, but not more, because the costs are too high. For homeowners, spending $50 too much on extra fertilizer isn't as big a deal. Farmers can also reduce costs by rotating crops. I've seen videos on farmers in Iowa swapping their soybean and corn fields for that reason.
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Old 05-04-2023, 07:01 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
7,255 posts, read 5,126,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WRM20 View Post
Farmers use as many chemicals as they need, but not more, because the costs are too high. For homeowners, spending $50 too much on extra fertilizer isn't as big a deal. Farmers can also reduce costs by rotating crops. I've seen videos on farmers in Iowa swapping their soybean and corn fields for that reason.
You bring up an interesting point....Crop rotation is done more to prevent diseases from becoming entrenched in the soil than for maintaining soil nutrition.

Legumes (beans) do fix atmospheric N into the crop (really it's the Rhyzobium bacteria that does it) but only supply about half of the N that the bean plants need-- and almost all of that N is carried off with the harvest. In fact, most of the nutrients sucked out of the soil by a crop are carried away with the harvest. That's why fields need to be fertilized each year....

Home owners mowing lawns also carry away a good deal of the soil nutrients when they bag the cuttings and dump them..They would need to apply less extrogenous fertilizer if they would use a mulching mower and not bag & dispose the clippings....At least they could compost the clippings and scatter it on the lawn each spring.
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Old 05-04-2023, 07:18 AM
 
17,619 posts, read 17,656,125 times
Reputation: 25684
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
You bring up an interesting point....Crop rotation is done more to prevent diseases from becoming entrenched in the soil than for maintaining soil nutrition.

Legumes (beans) do fix atmospheric N into the crop (really it's the Rhyzobium bacteria that does it) but only supply about half of the N that the bean plants need-- and almost all of that N is carried off with the harvest. In fact, most of the nutrients sucked out of the soil by a crop are carried away with the harvest. That's why fields need to be fertilized each year....

Home owners mowing lawns also carry away a good deal of the soil nutrients when they bag the cuttings and dump them..They would need to apply less extrogenous fertilizer if they would use a mulching mower and not bag & dispose the clippings....At least they could compost the clippings and scatter it on the lawn each spring.
In our current home we always mulch cut. No raking nor bagging. Walking on the lawn feels like a thick spongy carpet. I know this means it needs to be dethatched but the yard is too big for me to do it myself and I don’t feel it’s worth paying a professional to come do our yard dethatch. I inherited the home when my mom passed away and am paying a mortgage for roughly half the estimated value to pay out my sister’s share of the home. I would have chosen a home with a smaller yard. Our previous home, we cut with side discharge because the yard was practically a marsh, always wet and never dry, due to poor drainage.
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Old 05-04-2023, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Juneau, AK + Puna, HI
10,555 posts, read 7,750,499 times
Reputation: 16053
A friend in Bend, Oregon says it's required in his neighborhood. That is, a green lawn at your property.

That's right, it's in the CCR apparently. So, he must spend 90% of his monthly water use during summer on sprinkling his lawn in this high desert community. Insane!
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