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Old 05-29-2023, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Between Heaven And Hell.
13,534 posts, read 9,938,424 times
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If you have enough room, you could give something back to nature, by planting trees, but not so close that the space isn't any use for anything else anymore.
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Old 06-04-2023, 02:12 PM
 
4,086 posts, read 2,389,070 times
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When it comes to lawns, perhaps this quote is applicable:

'Never keep up with the Joneses. Drag them down to your level. It's cheaper.' Quentin Crisp 1908-1999
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Old 06-05-2023, 09:24 AM
 
859 posts, read 960,458 times
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Love my nice lawn, use lots of fertilizer, water, and gas fired blower to clean off at end.
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Old 06-05-2023, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Rural Wisconsin
19,428 posts, read 8,984,844 times
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We have a wooded lot in a rural neighborhood that is full of trees. People here do what they want. Of the 15 homes on our street occupying one- to two-acre lots, seven have lawns (all rentals, btw), but all but one of the year-rounders -- all retired -- have it natural.

We planted about three pounds of wildflower seeds in our front yard and around our home and patio, and I was a little nervous after living with suburban lawns all my life, but no one has said anything yet to us about it, even though our yard looks "wild" with a hodgepodge of tall grass and many different kinds of flowers -- but the deer love it, and it is such a treat to see at least one of them visit us every day from late May through most of October.
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Old 06-05-2023, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
8,590 posts, read 12,225,138 times
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One of the most freeing things was not worrying about a pristine lawn. Our lawn area is about 3 acres m/l. There is absolutely no way we're going to water it. It's a waste of a valuable resource, even in the Midwest. I also refuse to dump chemicals on it. Our property drains into a wooded flood plain and a creek. Down stream the creek goes into a river used for water. It seems irresponsible to me to pollute the natural woods and the creek with fertilizers and weed killers. The lawn is a mix of clover, some grass and whatever else grows.
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Old 06-05-2023, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Tricity, PL
61,037 posts, read 85,858,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
We have a wooded lot in a rural neighborhood that is full of trees. People here do what they want. Of the 15 homes on our street occupying one- to two-acre lots, seven have lawns (all rentals, btw), but all but one of the year-rounders -- all retired -- have it natural.

We planted about three pounds of wildflower seeds in our front yard and around our home and patio, and I was a little nervous after living with suburban lawns all my life, but no one has said anything yet to us about it, even though our yard looks "wild" with a hodgepodge of tall grass and many different kinds of flowers -- but the deer love it, and it is such a treat to see at least one of them visit us every day from late May through most of October.
I know how you feel. Our lots are big too. We don't see the neighbors houses.
They are well hidden behind big trees, native shrubs and plants. Most people have "wild" growing grass, with wild flowers and soft, lush clover lawns. In spring most are covered with bluebonnets - looks very pretty. Deer is frequently visiting and other animals. It's so much closer to nature than well manicured grass lawns that need so much care to look decent, but still quite boring.
And no, we don't live rural - but right in the 1+M big city.
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Old 06-05-2023, 05:42 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,987 posts, read 1,953,440 times
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I've been increasing clover and decreasing grass in our backyard and bees have been visiting more and more.

Started last year and continued this spring three ways:
1. digging up small clumps from current clover patches and planting them in places without clover, it takes over pretty well
2. speading clover seed in early spring
3. using same clover seed and starting seedlings that get planted

Pretty close to being done with this years clover, it's getting hotter with less rain
Will do more next winter/spring
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Old 06-06-2023, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Fiorina "Fury" 161
3,491 posts, read 3,699,863 times
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Yes. I hear people spending $3,000 on sod every couple of years and I think that's crazy. I'd like to get a house with no lawn at all and maybe just all asphalt or concrete all around the property (not very green of me either) but that wouldn't fly in most residential neighborhoods.
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Old 06-07-2023, 06:42 AM
 
859 posts, read 960,458 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Free-R View Post
Yes. I hear people spending $3,000 on sod every couple of years and I think that's crazy. I'd like to get a house with no lawn at all and maybe just all asphalt or concrete all around the property (not very green of me either) but that wouldn't fly in most residential neighborhoods.
If you do sod and you take care of it,

Watering is important, especially when temp rises.

Fertilizer and pre-emergent in early spring, fungicide in early July Scotts disease ex, then fertilize
again in fall.

Keep lawn mowed but not too short, control and remove any weeds.

You can keep that sod for year after year.
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Old 06-07-2023, 07:16 AM
 
3,679 posts, read 2,213,326 times
Reputation: 1994
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Not by a long shot....Farmers are generally very good about environmental concerns. The CRP program is easily the most effective thing going among any conservation efffort....

Farmers have a buffer zone along the edges of fields that serves to filter run-off (can't plant too close to streams anyways-- too wet to give good yield and edges would easily collapse into the stream)...But homeowners dump their ferilizers and chemicals onto lawns that are relatively impermeable compared to more natural grass/weed/wildflower land (ie- more run-off per sq ft ) and then, even worse, the run-off goes directly into storm sewers which usually dump that water directly into the rivers....

We could get into smaller details about famers being more frugal with the things they use (profit motive) while the homeowners are more likely to live by the American consummer's modus operandi-- If one is good, two must be better-- using more than they should....As I said, things would be much better if the homeowners would just follow the directions more responsibley.

You can search this stuff. It's been studied extensively and is in the agronomy literature.

edited to add-- Re: watering lawns...Most grasses are supposed to go dormant during the dry seasons. Watering a lawn isn't necessary for the health of the grass. Those who do it are perverting Nature for the aesthetic advantage...That's would be kinda like forcing an oak tree to retain its green leaves over the winter....I guess some people like deforming their Yew trees into geometric shapes too... De gustibus, non disputandum est.
I been holding back on the watering the lawn during this dry spell in PA. I am hoping for rain soon because my grass is looking like hay right now.
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