Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-23-2023, 01:00 PM
 
Location: The High Desert
16,068 posts, read 10,726,642 times
Reputation: 31422

Advertisements

The "perfect" lawn is impossible here in the high desert. Most people know that, but some idiots still try. The natural order of things here is rocky or barren ground with sage or saltbush. There is a lot you can do as landscaping with native plants without attempting to grow a doomed lawn. At this intensely sunny elevation and dry climate, any lawn grass is going to die unless it is watered every day and then it will be slowly buried by wind-blown sand or dust. I have not even heard a lawnmower in ten years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-23-2023, 04:32 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,541 posts, read 28,625,446 times
Reputation: 25110
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKTwet View Post
Why do we keep pouring money and energy resources into having a well manicured green lawn?
I thought having a green lawn had something to do with green living.

But I guess not. Oh well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2023, 02:48 PM
 
8,886 posts, read 4,571,779 times
Reputation: 16242
My lawn in AZ was gravel. Had drip irrigation system for the shrubs. Here in Florida I have mostly Bermuda grass, which gets watered twice a week in the summer, once per week the rest of the year. I'd like nothing better than to just quit mowing but my HOA would have me drawn and quartered.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2023, 08:33 AM
 
861 posts, read 864,882 times
Reputation: 2189
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Having the right lawn for your climate is key. We live in the south and have a nice thick carpet of centipede grass. I can count on one hand, the years we have had to water it. It doesn’t need a lot of fertilizer either.
^this. An adequately maintained lawn appropriate to your climate is an environmentally friendly option. Lawns soak up CO2 and cool the area around it. I see too many people in South Texas attempting to put in gravel and desert landscaping. There is a difference between semi-arid and arid climate. When our 30'' of rain arrives those with desert landscapes experience massive runoffs and erosion. Not to mention I've seen a lot of trees get sunburned by the reflection off of the 'desert landscaping'.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2023, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Lincoln County Road or Armageddon
5,012 posts, read 7,218,725 times
Reputation: 7298
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Having the right lawn for your climate is key. We live in the south and have a nice thick carpet of centipede grass. I can count on one hand, the years we have had to water it. It doesn’t need a lot of fertilizer either.

I agree about the centipede grass. What hacks me is proliferation of St. Augustine grass in my area. I don't want to hear a peep about "cutting back on water usage" and what day I can wash my car as long as that stuff is allowed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2023, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Tricity, PL
61,637 posts, read 86,981,866 times
Reputation: 131583
Centipede grass has poor drought tolerance. Wouldn't be suitable for me since we have long periods of time without a drop of rain.
We almost always have watering restrictions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2023, 05:47 AM
 
Location: Tricity, PL
61,637 posts, read 86,981,866 times
Reputation: 131583
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I thought having a green lawn had something to do with green living.

But I guess not. Oh well.
Nope. Quite the opposite.
Maintaining classic green lawns threaten the climate, biodiversity, water conservation and other sustainable goals.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2023, 03:21 PM
 
861 posts, read 864,882 times
Reputation: 2189
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Centipede grass has poor drought tolerance. Wouldn't be suitable for me since we have long periods of time without a drop of rain.
We almost always have watering restrictions.
Not sure it included Centipede grass but a few years ago Texas A&M did a study and found that the amount of top soil on a lawn was the largest determining factor of drought tolerance. In other words, pick any variety of lawn grass suitable for Texas weather and it will do equally well provided you have adequate topsoil. They actually found St Augustine did as well as Bermuda, Buffalo and Zoysia under drought conditions, IF you provided it with the recommended six inches of topsoil to grow in. The problem is home builders always skimp on topsoil and provide far less than what is needed for a lawn.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2023, 07:19 AM
 
9,846 posts, read 7,712,566 times
Reputation: 24480
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Nope. Quite the opposite.
Maintaining classic green lawns threaten the climate, biodiversity, water conservation and other sustainable goals.
I would think that's the case only if you live in an area where grass doesn't grow naturally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2023, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
32,919 posts, read 36,316,341 times
Reputation: 43748
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
I thought having a green lawn had something to do with green living.

But I guess not. Oh well.
I (almost) love my back yard lawn. While there is some grass, there's also quite a bit of clover, some escaped flowering groundcover, buttercups, and a few violets. I'll always have some dandelions. There are many bees in my yard every day. There's also a nasty area infested with plantain* that used to be a gravel drive. That stuff is evil.

*https://www.google.com/search?q=plan...hrome&ie=UTF-8
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:08 AM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top