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Old 05-07-2023, 09:38 PM
 
689 posts, read 638,386 times
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I generally use reusable bags in the grocery store. There are, however, times when I walk to the grocery store (15-30 minutes depending on the store). In those cases I buy bags. One of my kitchen waste cans has "hooks" on the side that hold the plastic bags.

I also have a slightly smaller trash can that holds some of the plastic mailers and inner shipping bags that Amazon uses.
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Old 05-08-2023, 02:38 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
7,246 posts, read 5,117,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WRM20 View Post
Again, naphtha is not a waste product of the refining process. It is a byproduct. In some parts of the world it is used for making plastics, in others, like the US, plastics are primarily made from natural gas.
Again, if that portion of naptha wasn't used for plastic, what would you do with all the extra naptha? It's a waste product until you figure out a use for it. (Cf- history of gasoline)....95% of a barrel of oil is kerosene + gasline. The other 5% is everything else-- lubricating oil, solvents (naptha) and short chain waste. ...Same with NG-- are we extracting "extra" NG so that we can make plastic, or just using all the NG that we do extract?

The naive worry about how much plastic we use, when the only real problem is how irresponsible people dispose of it at end of product life.
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Old 05-08-2023, 04:56 AM
 
15,407 posts, read 7,468,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Again, if that portion of naptha wasn't used for plastic, what would you do with all the extra naptha? It's a waste product until you figure out a use for it. (Cf- history of gasoline)....95% of a barrel of oil is kerosene + gasline. The other 5% is everything else-- lubricating oil, solvents (naptha) and short chain waste. ...Same with NG-- are we extracting "extra" NG so that we can make plastic, or just using all the NG that we do extract?

The naive worry about how much plastic we use, when the only real problem is how irresponsible people dispose of it at end of product life.
Fuels are more like 80-85% of what a barrel of oil produces. US Naphtha used as a chemicals feedstock is 138,000 barrels per day, out of total refinery runs of 17. 6 million barrels per day. Refineries are using naphtha as a base for octane and similar products used in gasoline. Most US plastics are made from natural gas. In other countries where less NG is available, naphtha is used as a feedstock.
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Old 05-08-2023, 07:00 AM
 
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We can still get plastic bags from stores in our state and yes, we reuse them in the small trash cans and for other things. I don't mind that they are super thin and might get holes.

What kills me is when I'm out of state and forget that they don't have free bags. I'll pay for a plastic bag and it's 10 times as thick as the ones we get here for free. How is that more green? Won't it take longer to decompose?

We really reuse every bag, no matter what type. I can't think of the last time we actually threw away any bag without using it a second time for something else.
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Old 05-08-2023, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
8,055 posts, read 7,422,895 times
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We've been re-using our plastic grocery bags for years. Not only for bedroom/bathroom garbage cans, but also for scooping the cat litter box!

We also smuggle them to friends who live across the border in New Jersey, where they are illegal.
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Old 05-08-2023, 10:00 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
7,246 posts, read 5,117,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WRM20 View Post
Fuels are more like 80-85% of what a barrel of oil produces. US Naphtha used as a chemicals feedstock is 138,000 barrels per day, out of total refinery runs of 17. 6 million barrels per day. Refineries are using naphtha as a base for octane and similar products used in gasoline. Most US plastics are made from natural gas. In other countries where less NG is available, naphtha is used as a feedstock.
A liitle brush up on naptha may be in order-- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphtha

I stand corrected on the make-up of a crude-- while it is 45% gasoline, but only 35% kerosone (I said 40%) https://petroleumservicecompany.com/...lon-breakdown/

"Naptha" is not a chemical itself, but rather the name used to describe most of the remaining 20%. Much of that is used to dilute heavier crude oil so it's easier to deal with in transportation & chemical processing, and a good deal of it is "cracked" in the distillation process to produce shorter organic chemicals for manufacturing- your "feedstock.".
https://petroleumservicecompany.com/...lon-breakdown/

Only about 2-3% of US petroleum goes into plastic (ie- if not used for plastic would be a waste product) and the amount of NG that goes into plastic is an infiintessimal amount of the 400 B cu ft of NG proiduced daily.

Eliminating plastic production would essentially do absolutely nothing to our "carbon footprint."

Plastic presents a dsposal problem, not a use problem....and if we replace it, how would we dispose of its replacement?

Last edited by guidoLaMoto; 05-08-2023 at 10:15 AM..
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Old 05-08-2023, 10:35 AM
 
15,638 posts, read 26,245,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Plastic grocery bags are perfect for lining trash cans, collecting used kitty litter, and protecting cars from muddy shoes and boots. I used to bring my lunch to work in one every day and still use them as a sort of "purse" to gather what I'll need for the day as I leave the house. They compress nicely, so I keep two in a discarded pharmacy pill bottle in my glove compartment for emergency use, such as an unplanned stop at Aldi's. I hate to see them go and am also hoarding them. If you want to ban something plastic, please ban the single-use water bottles that pollute the planet or those stupid memorial mylar balloon releases that kill wildlife!
Damn, that’s genius. Since clearing out dear late husband’s hoard, I’ve been way more a neat freak.

California banned single use bags ages ago so I made my own ripstop nylon grocery bags. Essentially using the same pattern as the plastic grocery bag which is the perfect size, they’re usually not too heavy to carry, mine are very foldable, so I have a little case I keep them in my car so I always have them and better than that they’re washable.

But I can see the wisdom of carrying a couple of those plastic bags in the car. And now I know how — thank you.
__________________
Solly says — Be nice!
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Old 05-08-2023, 12:16 PM
 
1,055 posts, read 546,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
I use grocery plastic bags although I always ask for paper bags, if available. Then use those paper bags.
The problem with some grocery plastic bags is that they aren't airtight (childproof?), so not suitable for wet trash.
I put some folded newspaper (usually the grocery circulars) in the bottom to absorb any moisture. The bottoms often have open spots where they are "welded" together, but the paper takes care of that.
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Old 05-08-2023, 01:03 PM
 
Location: The Triad
34,088 posts, read 82,929,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puginabug View Post
I use grocery bags for my small bathroom/bedroom trash containers.
And I use additional small bathroom bins everywhere else too. Kitchen, Laundry, etc.
It's nice to have an empty kitchen trash bin with a fresh bag from 6p-8a.
Tall bags always took 2 days or more to fill.

Is anyone old enough to remember when the kitchen bin was lined with newspaper?
No plastic at all.
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Old 05-08-2023, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Tricity, PL
61,658 posts, read 87,023,434 times
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Newspapers (who buys them anyway?) and grocery circulars are rare here.
I have very little paper trash at home.
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