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Old 08-20-2023, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Kansas
25,940 posts, read 22,094,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1200RT View Post
FWIW, hand washing dishes uses substantially more water than dishwashers.
That is what I have heard, but it really depending on how water conscience someone is. I am sure I wash dishes for 3 adults with less water than a dishwasher will take, and they are clean when I finish.

I have had dishwashers, and would not have another. I just read that a dishwasher uses 3% of the household water use and hand washing 4%, but there is the electricity involved with the electric dishwasher.

Everything any more is a sales pitch, so I don't often trust "testing".
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Old 08-20-2023, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
23,656 posts, read 13,964,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
I never thought such a mundane topic would make for an interesting discussion. As others have noted, I find washing dishes somewhat therapeutic and relaxing. Not that I love cleaning, but it's satisfying to look at a rack full of clean dishes. DONE! I always make it a point to make sure my kitchen is clean if I'm going out of town. Coming home tired to a sink of dirty dishes is defeating.

I haven't had cats for a few years, but they always had dry kibbles in whatever thrift store ceramic bowls were handy. Regarding wet food - are paper bowls too expensive or wasteful? Just toss into the wood stove or burn pile when done.
To directly answer your question, yes from a few angles. They are good for emergency and camping supplies but otherwise......

First of all, anything that has to be bought over and over again as oppose to reusuable is expensive in money, expensive in the in and out time. One runs into an additional potential problem of should they want to wash and reuse it, God forbid, it might not be designed for it and carry the same potential problems of reusing milk jugs.

In the matter of time, there is what it takes to get them, be it drive to the store or have it shipped, what it takes to find a source to get them from, and what it costs to dispose of them. I wouldn't say I have a recycling problem but not wanting to be part, as much as I can't, of the trash/land fill problem, I recycle as much as I can, question everything I use of if it can be. Clean it, store it, truck it up and take it to the place in town. One's time is most valuable.

As I am in Texas Wildfire Country, a burn pile is totally out of the question. I have no wood stove yet and besides, are such disposal plates safe to burn in the same fire that one cooks their food over? That is, what materials do they have in them that they may release when they are burned?

As far as what therapy washing dishes is to me, this is what a homesteading cowgirl does.
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Old 08-20-2023, 06:22 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
11,085 posts, read 17,530,236 times
Reputation: 44409
Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
To directly answer your question, yes from a few angles. They are good for emergency and camping supplies but otherwise......

First of all, anything that has to be bought over and over again as oppose to reusuable is expensive in money, expensive in the in and out time. One runs into an additional potential problem of should they want to wash and reuse it, God forbid, it might not be designed for it and carry the same potential problems of reusing milk jugs.

In the matter of time, there is what it takes to get them, be it drive to the store or have it shipped, what it takes to find a source to get them from, and what it costs to dispose of them. I wouldn't say I have a recycling problem but not wanting to be part, as much as I can't, of the trash/land fill problem, I recycle as much as I can, question everything I use of if it can be. Clean it, store it, truck it up and take it to the place in town. One's time is most valuable.

As I am in Texas Wildfire Country, a burn pile is totally out of the question. I have no wood stove yet and besides, are such disposal plates safe to burn in the same fire that one cooks their food over? That is, what materials do they have in them that they may release when they are burned?

As far as what therapy washing dishes is to me, this is what a homesteading cowgirl does.
As far as the trouble to get them, when we're running low, I just put foam plates on the grocery list on my phone. That way, no special trip. 200 9" plates cost me $8 at Walmart. With just two of us in the house, and we don't always need a plate, 200 plates will last us quite a while. I can save a plate by fixing a sandwich for lunch, put it on a paper towel and eat some chips out of the bag.
We do have regular plates we use from time to time, depending on what I'm cooking. But, like I said earlier, just spray some Dawn Power Wash on them, wipe them off, and they're good to go for next time
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Old 08-21-2023, 03:57 AM
 
17,603 posts, read 17,635,928 times
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I’d like to clear up a common myth. Hot water from a home’s water heater doesn’t disinfect dishes. For hot water to disinfect it has to be no less than 170 degrees F. It’s the scrubbing and rinsing that cleans the dishes. Hot soapy water helps to break down the food residue. Rinse in cold water before drying dishes.

I hate washing dishes so I do them frequently when there’s only so many dishes to wash limiting my time at the sink. I have an in-law who does the opposite. She lives alone and will use every dish possible before being absolutely necessary to wash dishes and has to stand there for an hour or more trying to scrub them clean and put away.
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Old 08-21-2023, 08:16 AM
 
3,934 posts, read 2,184,548 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1200RT View Post
FWIW, hand washing dishes uses substantially more water than dishwashers.
No proof whatsoever unless someone hand washing in full gushing blast of water out of an old water wasting faucet.

Clean/wipe the dish with the paper towel/paper napkin over your garbage bin right after you have used that plate. The same towel could wipe several plates if they are not greasy.
If greasy-put a dish detergent on your paper towel before wiping it. (One could even save the somewhat clean used towel after you dried clean veggies or clean hands?)

Put a tiny amount of dish soap on your wiped plate (you could even dilute your dish soap with water and put it in spray bottle - saves a lot of soap and water for rinsing)

Rinse. Just a small amount of water does it as your main mechanical action of wiping the plate usually removes everything.
Do not use too much soap.

You could even use just cold water for rinsing - it works very well with modern detergents.
The procedure above is very good for those on septic systems or with iffy old sewer pipes - no fatbergs to form compare to sending fat into your pipes dissolved in hot water…

Last edited by L00k4ward; 08-21-2023 at 08:43 AM..
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Old 08-21-2023, 09:45 AM
 
6,693 posts, read 5,925,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
I’d like to clear up a common myth. Hot water from a home’s water heater doesn’t disinfect dishes. For hot water to disinfect it has to be no less than 170 degrees F. It’s the scrubbing and rinsing that cleans the dishes. Hot soapy water helps to break down the food residue. Rinse in cold water before drying dishes.

I hate washing dishes so I do them frequently when there’s only so many dishes to wash limiting my time at the sink. I have an in-law who does the opposite. She lives alone and will use every dish possible before being absolutely necessary to wash dishes and has to stand there for an hour or more trying to scrub them clean and put away.
The cheapest way to disinfect your dishes, weather permitting, would be to put them out in sunlight. Sunlight kills microbes! It's a little known fact that without sunlight, we'd be knee-deep in bacteria.
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Old 08-21-2023, 11:23 AM
 
24,479 posts, read 10,804,014 times
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The dishwasher runs every day! Crystal, silver, dirty pots - all comes out nice, clean and dry and it makes no noise.
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Old 08-21-2023, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Right behind you
381 posts, read 169,941 times
Reputation: 1034
Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
I’d like to clear up a common myth. Hot water from a home’s water heater doesn’t disinfect dishes. For hot water to disinfect it has to be no less than 170 degrees F. It’s the scrubbing and rinsing that cleans the dishes. Hot soapy water helps to break down the food residue. Rinse in cold water before drying dishes.

I hate washing dishes so I do them frequently when there’s only so many dishes to wash limiting my time at the sink. I have an in-law who does the opposite. She lives alone and will use every dish possible before being absolutely necessary to wash dishes and has to stand there for an hour or more trying to scrub them clean and put away.
Glad I'm not the only one who uses cold water to rinse dishes. I also use cold water to rinse after washing my hands, but I live in an area where there is quite hard water. Cold water is the only type that really gets the soap off.

It's not rinsing in hot water that cleans the dishes it's the washing in hot water. I start with plates , then bowls, the other assorted things finishing with silverware.

I had a dishwasher once in an apartment, it seemed to leave some dishes still dirty and those annoying hard water stains that I never get with a cold water rinse.

I prefer the quiet meditation of washing the dishes.
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Old 08-21-2023, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,743 posts, read 22,641,589 times
Reputation: 24902
I wash dishes by hand. When I'm camping.

Other than than that it's scrape, rinse, rack and turn that mother 'on'.
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Old 08-23-2023, 10:42 AM
 
19,609 posts, read 12,210,591 times
Reputation: 26398
My dishwasher broke and I didn't replace. I don't use the sink itself to wash dishes but a basin that fits in the sink. I prefer dishwasher but it's a pain to replace the old one and need to make some plumbing updates if I do so I'm a hand washer now. I scrape and rinse everything before it goes in the wash basin, there is very little residue in the water. Use a washcloth with scrubby netting on one side, rinse and on the rack to dry. Not too bad but my sink isn't oversized so I can't put too much in at once. It does use a lot of water but I try to be careful.
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