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Old 12-31-2023, 04:12 AM
 
4,834 posts, read 3,262,003 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leastprime View Post
I haven’t been to McDonald’s in a really long time even though it’s a few blocks away.
Used a McDonald’s BOGO today on Quarter Pounders. Dine-in. Paper Bag, Corrugated box for each burger, and 3 recyclable brown paper napkins. Why the napkins? The burger was dry, no mayonnaise, the cheese was gooey, and the pickles weren’t pickles. Besides, I had sleeves, and long pants, and the toilet was near by.
The remaining refuse went into the trash bin because I decided that I didn’t want to separate the foil ketchup pouches from the recycleable paper.

Be another couple of years, I imagine

Whattaya mean the pickles weren't pickles?
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Old 12-31-2023, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
13,062 posts, read 7,497,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seguinite View Post
Whattaya mean the pickles weren't pickles?
When you can use the meat paddy thru the pickle slice.
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Old 01-01-2024, 05:19 PM
 
8,856 posts, read 6,848,510 times
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Only rice comes in paddies to be fair...
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Old 01-01-2024, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
13,062 posts, read 7,497,585 times
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revised

Quote:
Originally Posted by leastprime View Post
When you can [strike]use[/strike] see the meat paddy thru the pickle slice.
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Old 01-01-2024, 08:32 PM
 
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It's about ethical purchasing practices and living cleanly.

Boring, but also adds warmth and happiness to the experience of living.........
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Old 01-02-2024, 06:52 AM
 
Location: 5 years in Southern Maryland, USA
845 posts, read 2,829,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
The greenest approach would be a small homestead living off the land raising food like our ancestors did with a mule drawn plow. We could go further back but I don't think that's what you mean. Because even living in a city apartment you're still depending on the energy, water, waste, transportation, and agriculture infrastructure to keep you living a modern civilized lifestyle.

True, but at least apartments require less heating/ cooling - because the walls are shared with neighboring units. And they can be more accessible to public transport.
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Old 01-02-2024, 10:21 AM
 
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Apartments are vastly more sustainable. Sharing heating/cooling is one factor. Apartments are marvels of efficiency in material use, energy use, etc., all else being equal. One factor vs. a house is that you can live in less square feet because the fitness room is downstairs, you can use restaurants and hotels instead of having an extra room for everything, etc.

Just as importantly they don't use much land. You can get 200 units into a single acre in an urban format, or a decent percentage of that in a suburban one.

Homesteading sounds interesting but if every residence needs firewood, an outhouse, a water source, etc., things get bad fast. And you might be losing more natural land than even the current system.
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Old 01-04-2024, 01:46 PM
 
Location: In Little Ping's Maple Dictatorship
333 posts, read 153,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Green discussions are often about green tech, certified building materials, organic products, and so on. But isn't the greenest approach to simply use less?

An apartment instead of a house. Walking or using transit instead of driving. Buying less stuff. Not flying very often. Not putting the heat up too high.

We should still advance tech and use sustainable materials of course. But should we consider using less at least as important?
No, it wouldn't.

Every year, the globalists that push these green initiatives take private jets to Davos, then get into helicopters to take them to parking lots where they are picked up in large SUVs to be taken to the conference. They warn us that the ocean levels will rise in the coming years to the point that Florida is underwater, yet buy up all the coastline the moment it becomes available. They say we should own smaller houses while they live in mansions big enough for several families each. They push an unhealthy diet of insects while they stuff their faces with the finest Kobe beef. Finally, they say we own too much while their personal fortunes multiply over and over while they push this nonsense.

The greenest approach would be to lead by example. Until they do, I see no reason to take any of this seriously.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Apartments are vastly more sustainable. Sharing heating/cooling is one factor. Apartments are marvels of efficiency in material use, energy use, etc., all else being equal.
You think this is going to convince anyone to sell a house they spent the majority of their life paying for? An apartment is only as nice as your neighbours. If one of them gets roaches or bedbugs, it becomes your problem in rather short order. If they like to crank music and party all night 4 nights a week, you aren't going to sleep properly. These are never going to be issues in the house I own.

Quote:
One factor vs. a house is that you can live in less square feet because the fitness room is downstairs, you can use restaurants and hotels instead of having an extra room for everything, etc.
You have a point with the fitness room, but there's no way I'd ever trade my kitchen to eat overpriced food at a restaurant. It is pretty easy to learn to cook and I can make better tasting, higher quality meals on my own.

Last edited by MickIlhenney; 01-04-2024 at 01:56 PM..
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Old 01-05-2024, 08:41 AM
 
1,126 posts, read 607,749 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Apartments are vastly more sustainable. Sharing heating/cooling is one factor. Apartments are marvels of efficiency in material use, energy use, etc., all else being equal. One factor vs. a house is that you can live in less square feet because the fitness room is downstairs, you can use restaurants and hotels instead of having an extra room for everything, etc.

Just as importantly they don't use much land. You can get 200 units into a single acre in an urban format, or a decent percentage of that in a suburban one.

Homesteading sounds interesting but if every residence needs firewood, an outhouse, a water source, etc., things get bad fast. And you might be losing more natural land than even the current system.
Agreed 100%.

The common good would dictate that we manage our expanding population by limiting our spread and our expropriation of wild lands. Good ol urban sprawl with those huge fully detached houses, huge driveways and backyards.

The problem is that a lot of people are egocentric and self serving. They will do the "well Smith is buying a huge home and flying to Barbados every year, so why should I limit my lifestyle"? It's like a petulant child who steals a chocolate bar instead of paying for it because he saw his classmate do the same.

I suspect that eventually we all will be forced to live in smaller abodes (at least in big cities). The house prices have skyrocketed to ridiculous levels and governments are starting to realize that it's unsustainable. A well built condo can replace 1,000 houses. It's a no brainer.
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Old 01-05-2024, 11:10 AM
 
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There's certainly been a shift to multifamily in my region. Some of it's about cost, and some is about a growing number who value urban living. It's pretty remarkable how many people with high incomes (often young adults) want to live within walking distance of everything and don't have cars.

I agree that keeping up with the Joneses is an unimpressive trait. Teenyboppers want to be cool, but you'd think people would grow out of that.
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